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1:10 AM
Nice moon tonight.
It was raining behind me, so no illumination on the mountain.
Win some, lose some.
 
1:22 AM
@Robusto Wow, not bad.
The dark mountain adds to the photo, I say.
@Xanne Probably quite a few!
@Xanne What does this even mean?
 
 
1 hour later…
2:44 AM
@Cerberus It's a late-night joke. Nothing serious.
 
 
2 hours later…
4:34 AM
@Xanne OK!
 
 
2 hours later…
6:39 AM
+2C, light snow
 
 
2 hours later…
8:55 AM
@Robusto No two decades later, here it is:
That's ten minutes of your time. A suite of five pieces.
Time stamps in the description. (Which is either underneath the score or to its right, depending on screen orientation/resolution. Though you can't click on the time stamps, you can only navigate there manually by grabbing and moving the blue progress bar.)
Happy listening.
 
 
8 hours later…
4:30 PM
Oh...chatroom on Sunday while waiting in the checkout line.
Boopity boop
You know what would be cool?
A dog that...
 
5:01 PM
@Robusto I'm thinking that you're mistaken about if=when not being a conditional sentence. Either that or that term means something else to you and our asker. When the queen is home, the flag is flying.
 
 
2 hours later…
7:29 PM
@tchrist I don't agree that I'm mistaken. In every case I can think of, if != when. "When the queen is home, the flag is flying" is not a conditional, in my view, since it is equivalent to saying "In February, March and April, the flag is flying." It refers to a factual event, not something supposed or expected.
Yours is a very Germanic view, btw. I can't tell you how often I've heard Germans saying, in English, "When you will go across town today, please pick up a copy of the Frankfurter Allgemeine." They mean when as in the German wenn, which is most definitely a conditional.
Take the statement "When you arrive after midnight, the doors will be locked." I don't see that that is the same as "If you arrive after midnight, the doors will be locked." The former and the latter have subtle but important differences, in my view.
The first expects an occurrence, the second does not.
 
7:46 PM
@RegDwigнt Hey, good job. I thoroughly enjoyed the suite. I especially like the way you ended the 3rd movement (?). It pulls the listener out of a merry complacency and says, "Hey, listen to me, goddamn it!".
As always, I would like to hear this with real instruments. So get on that. I'm sure there are plenty of musicians around who could spend ten minutes reading this for you.
One note: I presume by flûte à bec en do you are referring to a tenor recorder, since the score considers the lowest note of that instrument to be middle C. You might actually want a treble recorder there, which sounds an octave above. The tenor recorder will get completely lost even against the low range of the concert flute, never mind the string trio and piano, wherease the treble recorder will dance around an octave above everything, "tinkling to the ear" (as Stevens would have it).
 
8:17 PM
In other news: "When stupidity is considered patriotism, it is unsafe to be intelligent." —Isaac Asimov
 
 
2 hours later…
9:52 PM
@Robusto I'm pretty sure that both of these are conditional statements by definition: If x = 2, then x² = 4. If x² ≠ 4, then x ≠ 2. Do you disagree?
@MattE.Эллен Today I was flabbergasted to learn that you can only get nutmeats from American walnuts, never from English walnuts! This is just like how English cherries never have pits, only American cherries do, which accounts for why English cherries come so dear at fourteen pounds.
Vegetarians had therefore best stick to English walnuts, not American walnuts.
@Robusto I'm equally certain that this is a conditional statement by the same logic: If you arrived to the club after midnight, then you had to pay to get in the door.
 
 
1 hour later…
11:01 PM
@tchrist I never said if was not a conditional.
 

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