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1:40 AM
That's a little more like it.
And in the other direction:
Nice couple out walking their baby, stopped and chatted with me before the moon came up.
 
2:42 AM
Word of the day: ypointing
 
3:16 AM
> What needs my Shakespeare for his honoured bones,
The labor of an age in pilèd stones,
Or that his hallowed relics should be hid
Under a star-ypointing pyramid?
 
3:58 AM
> There were no ballots distributed for Lincoln in ten of the Southern states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, and Texas.
Oops, never knew that.
Could have some US state exclude Trump from the ballot?
 
4:47 AM
Cases of pneumonia in Sverdlovsk Region
Period: 30 Aug to 13 Dec
 
 
3 hours later…
7:58 AM
Bought enough vitamin D to last me till spring at the rate of 30 thousand IU/week
I hope I have some intact bones remaining by spring.
Males for some reason withstand high doses of vitamin D better, loosing less bone matter:
> After 3 years, females lost 1.8% (400 IU), 3.8% (4000 IU), and 5.5% (10,000 IU), whereas males lost 0.9% (400 IU), 1.3% (4000 IU), and 1.9% (10,000 IU) at the radius.
Looks like the optimal maximal dose which it's better not to exceed is 3000 IU/day.
Not the 4000 IU/day.
 
8:29 AM
@tchrist that's the pits. verifying nationality based on biology is a new low in the culture war!
 
I first heard the expression "the pits" in a Frank Zappa song in the early 2000s
> I need the knits
The double knits
I need the knits
They are the pits
I only still don't get the meaning of cadets here:
> Portly,
Regular,
Cadet,
Tall,
And long
Nice animation
 
9:04 AM
Edward G. Nalbandian (December 29, 1927 – February 22, 2006) was the owner of Zachary All Clothing, a store he opened in the 1950s at 5467 Wilshire Boulevard (just west of La Brea Avenue) in Los Angeles, California. The store was located in the Miracle Mile shopping district of Wilshire Blvd. In the 1950s and 1960s, Nalbandian became a minor celebrity, making frequent appearances in commercials for his store and even on talk shows such as The Tom Duggan Show. Most of these commercials featured the line "Come on down to 5-4-6-7 Wilshire Boulevard". In one commercial, Nalbandian said of his low...
Looks like an Armenian surname. Or Azeri.
 
@CowperKettle I found a site (had some content blocked by IT security, so I won't link) saying cadet is a style of golfing glove with shorter fingers and wider palms. not sure why it got that name
perhaps cadet trousers are shorter in the leg and wider in the waist?
 
Thank you! I also think that "cadet" must be a shorter size designation for clothing items.
> early 17th century (in cadet (sense 2)): from French, from Gascon dialect capdet, a diminutive based on Latin caput ‘head’. The notion ‘little head’ or ‘inferior head’ gave rise to that of ‘younger, junior’.
Maybe clothing for kids.
 
9:28 AM
> George Wallace's neglect of his family and frequent extramarital affairs resulted in his wife filing for divorce in the late 1950s; she later dropped the suit after he promised to be a better husband.[6][7] By all accounts, the two had a very happy marriage for the rest of her life.
Divorce is a good way to fix your love life.
> As was common at the time, her physician told her husband the news, not her. George Wallace insisted that she not be informed. As a result, she did not get appropriate follow-up care.
Oh, that's a very happy marriage, with your husband hiding your cancer from you for 4 years.
> When she saw a gynecologist for abnormal bleeding in 1965, his diagnosis of uterine cancer came as a complete shock to her. When one of her husband's staffers revealed to her that Wallace had discussed her cancer with them, but not her, during his 1962 campaign three years earlier, she was outraged.
The US history is very interesting.
Democracy forces people to at least state their opinions and fight for them openly.
 
@CowperKettle ah! could be
 
9:54 AM
> Therefore, clinical recognition of cerebral folate deficiency is critical to our understanding of neuro–developmental as well as neuro–psychiatric disorders.
I don't understand the meaning of clinical recognition
It either means "it's important for doctors to be able to recognize the disease" (that it, to make a diagnosis).
Or it may mean "it's important that doctors recognize that such a disease exists and is worthy of further study".
The whole article is written is a slapdash way, with sentences open to different interpretation, and many empty turns of phrase seemingly added just to pad the volume up. mdpi.com/2075-4426/11/8/710/htm#B62-jpm-11-00710
This particular sentence starts in a way "It's important for the clinicians to be able to detect the diease".
But it ends in a such a way as if it mean to say that "it's important for the clinical community to accept the existence of this disease".
Hastily written, probably. Or written by a student.
 
 
1 hour later…
11:05 AM
@CowperKettle That's an ambiguous phrase in the given context. Is there more/other relevant context?
 
11:32 AM
I'll translate it ambiguously and be done with it.
 
@CowperKettle The extra context doesn't really help. That's poorly written, but that's also about par for scientific literature. I suppose asking the authors what the hell they are talking about is not an option?
 
 
1 hour later…
12:39 PM
> So in the U.K., the Royal Mail delivers the post, whilst in North America both the U.S. Postal Service and Canada Post deliver the mail.
I bet they are doing this just to drive all the world mad. This, and the Imperial System of measures.
 
And in the UK, the Post Office sells life insurance
Until a few weeks ago I thought the Post Office and Royal Mail were the same thing.
but sadly not
 
@CowperKettle Not a chance. If Trump's name had been left off the ballot anywhere you'd have heard the Republicans screaming bloody murder.
 
1:08 PM
@MattE.Эллен It's all a Nutsy plot to rally the lazy drupes with plum jobs shelling civilian peanuts and carting them off to internment camps.
 
@tchrist too many puns bzzzt
:D
 
1:27 PM
@MattE.Эллен Rather jarring.
 
Block that metaphor!
The indolent progressions of the swans
Made earth come right; a peanut parody
For peanut people.
 
Unseasoned 10 10 5 ⋙ 5 7 5.
Unless swans are seasonally migratory.
 
Life is an old casino in a park.
The bills of the swans are flat upon the ground.
A most desolate wind has chilled Rouge-Fatima
And a grand decadence settles down like cold
 
I sense a lot of pent up feet there.
 
1:37 PM
@tchrist From Academic Discourse at Havana by Wallace Stevens. Of course.
 
@MattE.Эллен I thought they were too. Isn't the Royal Mail the name of the UK Postal Service?
 
The UK and the USA should be forcibly merged for a couple decades, in order to harmonize the language. For the sake of all humanity.
 
@CowperKettle "don't bind to some variants"
 
Also, "Good news never ceases." News is a mass noun in English.
 
And anyway, the US broke off because the King established the Boundary Line. There is no such line anymore, so no reason to be apart.
 
1:42 PM
@FaheemMitha Yes, but the Post Office is not part of Royal Mail. I was looking on Wikipedia and they officially split in 2012. A load of government shenanigans.
 
@CowperKettle The only boundary line was whatever the colonists wanted, the colonists got. It was called Manifest Destiny.
Manifest destiny was a widely held cultural belief in the 19th-century United States that American settlers were destined to expand across North America. There are three basic themes to manifest destiny: The special virtues of the American people and their institutions The mission of the United States to redeem and remake the west in the image of the agrarian East An irresistible destiny to accomplish this essential dutyHistorian Frederick Merk says this concept was born out of "a sense of mission to redeem the Old World by high example … generated by the potentialities of a new earth for building...
 
@MattE.Эллен That's so weird.
 
@Robusto In Russia, Cossacks wanted to run away from Ivan the Terrible, and they ran into Siberia, and bumped into the khanates there. And destroyed the khanates, and settled there.
 
@Robusto AKA mass murder, with a hefty dose of entitlement.
 
1:43 PM
@CowperKettle Frankly they'd see us harmounising our langue with the trans-canalicular French if they could ménage it.
 
The Russian conquest of Siberia took place in the 16th and 17th centuries, when the Khanate of Sibir became a loose political structure of vassalages that were being undermined by the activities of Russian explorers. Although outnumbered, the Russians pressured the various family-based tribes into changing their loyalties and establishing distant forts from which they conducted raids. To counter this, Kuchum Khan attempted to centralize his rule by imposing Islam on his subjects and reforming his tax-collecting apparatus. == Conquest of the Khanate of Sibir == The Russian conquest of Siberia began...
 
@FaheemMitha Also true.
 
@Robusto Also?
 
Russia never conquered Siberia. Siberia was always part of Russia so they only planted flags, nothing more.
 
Haha
So I thought as a kid.
It was a surprise as an adult to discover that there was a conquest.
 
1:45 PM
Crimea River.
 
@FaheemMitha I found out when we tried to setup redirection after moving house and the Post Office made a mistake, which they wouldn't admit to, and said it was down to Royal Mail. The puzzled look on my face almost became fixed.
 
@FaheemMitha That was me including your point in my assessment.
 
@MattE.Эллен No offense, but the UK is getting weirder.
@Robusto Ah, OK.
 
@FaheemMitha Even odd ducks may grow up to be brutal swans.
 
@MattE.Эллен I can imagine. :-)
 
1:46 PM
I loved traveling to Crimea in the USSR. It took three full days on the train, moving from Siberia to the almost-subtropical climate of Crimea. It was so interesting to see the nature change the other side of the window pane. It really beats the plane in this regard.
 
@tchrist I hear swans are scary. They bite. And their wings pack a punch too.
 
@FaheemMitha none taken. the problems the Tories have created within the last decade alone. This latest thing about imperial weights and measures is just preposterous.
 
@MattE.Эллен Latest thing? Do tell.
 
Having the Royal Mail be different from the Post Office is like having air mail be different from postal mail.
 
By the way, mail used to be male until the 18th century. I mean the spelling.
 
1:48 PM
@FaheemMitha oh, well I don't know how recent it is, but I only heard about it last week. The Tories want us to start using imperial units again. Not that we're totally metric, but really unnecessary to go backwards
 
@tchrist Quite so. Perhaps the USPS will take inspiration from that and split into the United States Postal Service and the President's Mail. Or perhaps, White House Mail.
 
@CowperKettle In French.
 
@MattE.Эллен That's totally bonkers. What drugs are they on?
 
@CowperKettle And now it's F(ederal)E(xpress)Mail.
 
@FaheemMitha all of them. probably a problem converting between grammes and ounces.
 
1:49 PM
@MattE.Эллен LOL
Too much drugs would explain it.
 
But variant spellings in English signify nothing. It's as if there was a rule that no words that sound alike can be spelled the same, and none that are spelled the same can be pronounced that way.
 
Your PM definitely looks like he's on something. Besides a power trip, that is.
 
I guess we have something in common. It's inexplicable why anyone voted for either of our PMs.
 
@MattE.Эллен I'm not sure that it makes sound sense to characterize arbitrary changes in terminology using metaphors that assume words occupy some well-ordered number line with assigned numeric meanings of forwards and backwards, positive and negative.
 
1:53 PM
@tchrist I agree with Matt. Imperial is definitely a regression.
Also, it's mad.
 
@MattE.Эллен This is why your erstwhile 1-gram cherry centers are back up to 14 pounds again: to make them easier sells at the greengrocer.
 
Can one still buy chocolate digestives in the UK? I used to be quite partial to them.
I've been unable to get them elsewhere, at least at something resembling a reasonable price.
 
@tchrist reverting or reversing seem like going backwards to me
@FaheemMitha yeah. we still have the best biscuits!
 
@MattE.Эллен It used to be McVities, I think.
 
@FaheemMitha Yes, but that's probably a subsidiary of Mars or something now!
 
Can I ask about legal terms here? Does anyone know the generic term is for submissions from the plaintiff/petitioner, in the British system? Assuming such a term exists. I actually want to know about India, but I figure the British system would be close.
For example, it could be a Writ Petition. One of the few legal terms I know.
@MattE.Эллен Oh
 
@FaheemMitha You will never convince some 330 million Americans who will never travel the thousands of miles needed to leave their own country and its customs and language that for some reason they need to use all those completely different numbers which all those people chilliads of klicks away use. They'll never go there, they'll never talk to them; it will never matter to them, so you won't convince them.
 
@FaheemMitha Apparently the parent company is Pladis. The McVitie's brand still lives on
 
@tchrist I thought we were talking about the UK. I'm confused.
It's such a British thing to call a biscuit a Digestive.
 
@MattE.Эллен I can't imagine seeing apothecary measures of grains and drams and such ever re-appear for vitamins and medications now labelled in metric, but it's really bulk fresh produce and flesh products that gets labelled only in English, and that only because there is no hand-label on those: people just grab a bunch and put it in a bag. Printed labels always have both English and non-English on them, like for pints or gallons of milk.
 
2:06 PM
@tchrist in the US? In the UK I think they've stopped with ounces, pounds, and pints in supermarkets. Still do pints in pubs though
 
@Robusto So racing pigeons deliver the mail, pack mules the post?
 
I get it. it'll be easier to trade with the US if we're using the same weights and measures. Which means it would make sense not to revert, but to progress to the US system
 
@MattE.Эллен Yes, here milk and cream and such come in whole pints, quarts, gallons. It's the size of the container. Most other liquids like cough syrup or soda pop come in integer grams with floating-point ounces. Something like that. :)
You can buy a half-gallon container of milk. Or apple cider, this time of the year.
@MattE.Эллен I think we have to include the metric numbers on labels for things that aren't "fresh produce" of the sort of mentioned.
 
Still, I want everyone to use SI units. I don't want to be measuring pressure in mmHg or lb/in². give me kg/ms² or give me death!
2
 
@tchrist It shall happen eventually!
They're already using the metric system in various ways.
 
2:13 PM
@tchrist Yeah, I assume we will, too, because we want to trade with the EU
 
@MattE.Эллен The pressure is currently 23.99 of Hg here. Is that helpful to know?
 
@MattE.Эллен I think that will make absolutely no difference for bulk trading.
 
@tchrist I'm more bemused by the fact that the device I work on shows blood pressure in mmHg and gas pressure in kPa.
 
@MattE.Эллен Right, it's so that we can trade with nearby American/New-World countries.
@MattE.Эллен Oh those are 23.99 inches of Hg, not millimeters of Hg!
 
@tchrist lol that's even more coefficients!
 
2:16 PM
At last the times are in metric. :)
And the humidity!
 
I can't ever keep my newtons and my pascals straight.
 
Pressure is N/m².
 
Newton did calculus, Pascal did gambling
 
Newton is the English unit.
 
2:20 PM
The newton (symbol: N) is the International System of Units (SI) derived unit of force. It is named after Isaac Newton in recognition of his work on classical mechanics, specifically Newton's second law of motion. A newton is defined as the force which gives a mass of 1 kilogram an acceleration of 1 metre per second, per second, 1 kg⋅m/s2. == Definition == One newton is the force needed to accelerate one kilogram of mass at the rate of one metre per second squared in the direction of the applied force. The units "metre per second squared" can be understood as a change in velocity per time, i.e...
That's English?
 
Yes.
 
I think not. It says "SI".
 
Blaise Pascal ( pass-KAL, also UK: -⁠KAHL, PASS-kəl, -⁠kal, US: pahs-KAHL; French: [blɛz paskal]; 19 June 1623 – 19 August 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, philosopher, writer and Catholic theologian. He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen. Pascal's earliest mathematical work was on conic sections; he wrote a significant treatise on the subject of projective geometry at the age of 16. He later corresponded with Pierre de Fermat on probability theory, strongly influencing the development of modern economics and social science. In...
Pascal was French, Newton English.
 
@tchrist that's less than an atmosphere!
@Cerberus you're correct, of course, I got confused with the "pounds per square inch" concept.
 
@Cerberus Knowledge is Power. France is Bacon.
 
2:23 PM
lol
 
snort
 
A newton is like ten mega foot-pounds per square hour.
mac(tchrist)% units newton foot-pounds/hour^2
	* 93739860
	/ 1.0667821e-08
Very powerful.
A pascal is even bigger!
mac(tchrist)% units pascal foot-pounds/acre/hour^2
	* 3.7935175e+11
	/ 2.6360759e-12
 
Pascal was a great man. He invented the first public bus system.
 
mac(tchrist)% perl -MLingua::EN::Inflect=NUMWORDS -E 'say ucfirst(join(", ", NUMWORDS(3.7935175e+11)))'
Three hundred and seventy-nine billion, three hundred and fifty-one million, seven hundred and fifty thousand
Immense.
 
@MattE.Эллен SI and decimal units are an abomination of human-centered speciesist kindergarten finger counting, exacerbated by faux-enlightenment francophlilia. Imperial measures, despite its misleading imperial and iconographic naming (feet, yard, ounce, pint, acre) is the universal unit measurement system because of its binary and ternary number system. Everything is base two or three.
 
2:31 PM
@Mitch so you can count it on your nostrils or ... is there something we have three of?
 
@MattE.Эллен persons
Me and thee and he make three.
 
2 cups - pint
2 pints = quart
2*2 quarts = gallon
2*2 pecks = bushel
2*2*3*5 seconds = minute
2*2*3*5 minutes = hour
2*2*2*3 hours = day
I could go on and on times 2
 
how many yards in a mile?
 
Remember that a 1 gallon = 1 kilodram.
@MattE.Эллен 1760
I didn't look.
You just know these things.
 
not so base 3 now!
 
2:34 PM
I'd prefer a return to the 5,000-foot mile personally.
 
I would prefer remaining at the 1000 metre kilometre
 
It took me awhile to memorise that 1 pound is 450 grams.
I wish it were at least 500.
One foot is 0.33 meters, roughly.
 
@tchrist I have a terrible memory, the fewer magic numbers the better.
 
Every time in the movie somebody says that a plane flies at 20 thousand feet, and you need to mentally divide by 3 in order to understand. Roughly 6 kilometers.
 
@MattE.Эллен 1760
sorry it took so long I was counting
 
2:36 PM
snert
 
Isn't the earth by definition 60 * 360 minutes=nautical-miles around?
 
imaging going back to pre-decimal currency! 240d to the lb
 
> 1 toise was divided in 6 feet (French: pieds) or 72 inches (pouces) or 864 lines (lignes) in France until 1812.
 
but using binary it is 2*2*2*2*2*3*5*11
 
how intuitive
 
2:39 PM
Given that the earth is a nice round number of units around sexagessimally, this proves the Babylonians knew best.
 
1 foot = 1 light-nanosecond
I think there's you proof right there
 
@Mitch is that real?
that's pretty good
 
@MattE.Эллен Yes
look it up
Also pi seconds is a nano-century
but that is just trivia
 
> In 1825, the Exchequer of Pleas heard the case of Tyson v. Thomas, regarding an unfulfilled 1823 contract for the delivery of 20 hobbits of barley in Llanrwst, at 10 shillings each.
 
mac(tchrist)% units second year
	* 3.1688765e-08
	/ 31556926
mac(tchrist)% units feet nanolightyear
	* 3.2218074e-08
	/ 31038479
 
2:43 PM
What is the meaning of the mac command?
 
It is not a command, it is my prompt in my shell on my Mac.
The command name itself is "units".
 
It's very good at figuring out hard things.
 
A half-peck apple bag
 
Indeed so.
mac(tchrist)% units "12 acre-feet/day" megaliter/minute
	* 0.010279015
	/ 97.285583
 
2:46 PM
The number of minutes in a month (four weeks) is...
 
@CowperKettle so a peck of pickled pepper is quite a lot
 
8 factorial
 
A firlot is equal to four pecks.
 
@Mitch Which weeks?
 
@MattE.Эллен You don't eat it all in one sitting
 
2:47 PM
@Mitch would make your mouth feel really weird
 
mac(tchrist)% units hectosecond '4 weeks'
	* 4.1335979e-05
	/ 24192
@Mitch Is ^^^^ what you were looking for?
 
units minute week
* 9.9206349e-05
/ 10080
times 4 weeks (~month) = 40320
 
Jim ate him some good apples,
Two firlots and a peck,
When he came to, the surgeon said
You went above your spec
 
@Mitch You can specify the number of such units if you quote the argument.
mac(tchrist)% units minutes '4 weeks'
	* 2.4801587e-05
	/ 40320
 
3:08 PM
@tchrist Not only has someone been there well before us and explored many variations never before considered, -many- people have looked over that code, adding a new unit or factor.
As stupid as wikipedia is, if you have a question for it, multiple people have done multiple hours of work each to make that available.
 
The command has its own Wikipedia page?
 
@tchrist oh. Maybe? no, I was thinking more abstractly. like the units command is kinda like a wikipedia page in that many people know a lot more about it than you do, or rather a lot of people have had the same questions as you and already answered them.
 
> Tom Jefferson, who has led Cochrane Collaboration reviews of flu vaccines, has called clinical evidence concerning flu vaccines "rubbish" and has therefore declared them to be ineffective
Interesting. I never heard of that.
Tom Jefferson is a British epidemiologist, based in Rome, Italy, who works for the Cochrane Collaboration. Jefferson is an author and editor of the Cochrane Collaboration's acute respiratory infections group, as well as part of four other Cochrane groups. He is also an advisor to the Italian National Agency for Regional Health Services.In 1999, Jefferson was one of the founding members of the Brighton Collaboration along with Harald Heijbel, Ulrich Heininger, and Elisabeth Loupi. He has worked on Cochrane reviews examining the effectiveness of the anti-viral oseltamivir and the influenza vaccine...
 
3:52 PM
> mac(tchrist)%
I like it; let's all switch to this unit.
 
4:45 PM
Wow. I went to sleep and woke up because I could only breathe through the mouth. Total sinus congestion. It has gotten milder now. Only the right passage is completely blocked.
 
5:03 PM
I haven't had a cold for 3 years
An 18-yo first-year student in Perm started a shooting and killed 6 people and injured 20
Died one hour after being shot by the police.
Despite an emergency surgery at the local hospital.
Left a message, a long text describing symptoms of derealization.
And a general disaffection with humanity.
Left a separate big-letter sheet at his flat asking to take care of his cat if his mom has a heart attack.
 
 
2 hours later…
6:42 PM
@MattE.Эллен A yard is always 3 feet, so it is by definition base 3.
 
I thought some gardens could be larger.
 
@Cerberus It seems the Dutch are getting shorter. Probably from all that metric measurement.
 
@Robusto Actually, I believe it is from immigration.
 
7:00 PM
So stop importing short people. QED
 
Well, everybody we could import would be short.
But, yeah, that is what the right wants.
 
I'm only 168 cm. Probably a dwarf in Dutch terms.
 
Naaah.
I'm sure we have a million Dutchmen shorter than that.
 
When I go jogging on Saturdays, all others are taller than me.
Except for the women.
Because Russians seem to be getting taller.
Probably due to better nutrition.
And generally people look more beautiful than I recall them looking in the 1980s
Maybe.. maybe Dutch people are generally taller because of evolution.
Shorter Dutch people basically drowned, while taller stayed alive during floods.
 
I'm sure that's it.
 
7:21 PM
@Robusto or all the tall people have left for Valhalla or Eónil in the west
 
7:47 PM
They got little hands, little eyes
They go around tellin' great big lies
 

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