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12:31 AM
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Q: Another way to say " from concept to completion"

LizAny ideas for a single word that convey the idea of concept to completion. We want to stay away from things like "full circle etc..." I'm writing content for a hospitality furniture manufacturing company. Help! I'm really stumped here.

 
1:30 AM
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Q: Another to say the max and min number

CatsI've been writing a program and I often come across naming variables that store the maximum and minimum value in a set of data. Is there any word that means both the max and minimum values of something? Right now the only word I can think of describing this is "outlier" but I feel that implies th...

 
 
3 hours later…
4:38 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] URL in title, bad keyword in body, bad keyword in title: simp3.xyz/balance-kelvin-sean-mp3-song-download/ by yarcond on english.SE
 
4:55 AM
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Q: One word substitute for a particular personality type

SakshamWhat is a one word substitute for "One who love getting physically tired" ?

 
5:46 AM
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Q: What is the verb for "concept becomes word"?

SeanThe formation of concept from something is "conceptualize". But what about the formation of word from concept? I can only think of bad substitutions like: "materialize from concepts" or even "wordify". As a bonus, it would be even better if your suggestion originates from Cognitive Psychology, P...

 
 
2 hours later…
7:57 AM
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Q: Is hyprocrisy the right word?

AlexLI'm from Germany and I'm looking for a word that describes the following. In General: To tell someone something is wrong but doing it myself Example: Tell someone stealing is wrong(or even punish him/her) but steal something yourself Hope you can help me and thanks :) BR Alex

 
8:29 AM
@Mitch dodecahedrane
Hydrocarbon with carbons forming a dodecahedron
The hydrogens are there, but never drawn
@Mitch well, joking aside, I think a seemingly simple grammar question with complicated answers is the way to go. And there are lots of those
"Is 'there is eggs on the plate' grammatical?" But that's beaten to death by Araucaria
They should arrest him for assault
Hello @Gigili! Never got the chance to say "happy New Year"
Happy Nowruz
Belated, but I've got more belated happy birthdays
 
8:53 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] URL in title, bad NS for domain in body, bad NS for domain in title, bad keyword in body, bad keyword in title, +5 more: testosteronesboosterweb.com/vxl-male-enhancement/ by kjudhfjh on english.SE
 
@SmokeDetector Drupal is this way
 
 
3 hours later…
11:32 AM
@M.A.R.ಠ_ಠ wow. Does that exist in real life or is it synthesizable? I thought the buckyball is only, with difficulty, synthesizable.
 
@Mitch you have no idea! Check out other fullerenes. This is a hydrocarbon, not a fullerene, BTW, but we have fullerenes with number of carbons ranging from 28 to 1000-something
 
 
1 hour later…
12:50 PM
@M.A.R.ಠ_ಠ wikis it all...
A fullerene is a molecule of carbon in the form of a hollow sphere, ellipsoid, tube, and many other shapes. Spherical fullerenes, also referred to as Buckminsterfullerenes or buckyballs, resemble the balls used in association football. Cylindrical fullerenes are also called carbon nanotubes (buckytubes). Fullerenes are similar in structure to graphite, which is composed of stacked graphene sheets of linked hexagonal rings. Unless they are cylindrical, they must also contain pentagonal (or sometimes heptagonal) rings. The first fullerene molecule to be discovered, and the family's namesake, ...
 
1:04 PM
@Mitch I'd like to see your Chicago question answered. I think part of what's happening is that Americans have no more than two phonemes for all of the set [a], [ɑ], [ɐ], [ɒ], [ɔ], and that many have only one for all of those. You’ll listening to a lot of recordings trying to toss variations into either FATHER or THOUGHT buckets. There’s also some variation between [ɐ] and [ʌ] and [ə]. Notice even how cart and card differ in their vowel realization. The first is short, more cut than car.
 
 
1 hour later…
2:18 PM
@tchrist I'm going down the rabbit whole of self mistrust on that English variety IPA wiki page
Like the PALM vowel sounds very different to me than the vowel in father, and I didn't think that the IPA for it is what I would expect (for GenAmE).
 
@Mitch I was going to mention that. For me the PALM vowel is the same as in the words call or all, which is the THOUGHT vowel.
It isn't like father or khan or car.
Then again, like almost all Americans and unlike Brits, I have the same vowel in CLOTH as in THOUGHT. I don't believe there's a minimal pair for those. I do not have the COT—CAUGHT merger.
 
@tchrist I was just listening to a John McWhorter podcast Lexicon Valley and he gives a 'why' explanation of vowel shift/cycles, where if one vowel changes towards another class, that other class will tend to move, and then that might displace another, but that first move leaves a spot that -could- be filled and the last one on the train can more easily move to that first one. For once a 'why' answer'
 
I've heard that one.
Rather, that podcast of his.
 
@tchrist same here. (all those phenomena for me too). The chart shows that the GenAmE for CLOTH and THOUGHT are the same.
 
I rhyme done with run, not with gone.
 
2:24 PM
Like all frameworks 'lexical sets' really simplifies things and makes them clear...
until it doesn't and it gets nuanced.
 
I also rhyme gone with lawn, but I don't thing Brits do.
 
Brits.
know what I mean?
 
They're a lot more tolerant of accents than Americans are.
American accents excepted. :)
 
By tolerant you mean they'll speak any old way. Can't stick to just one.
DISCIPLINE PEOPLE.
It's a thing.
@tchrist I think that tolerance is a more modern (30-40 years) thing. Like supposedly it's weird to have a purely RP newscaster, they're almost expected to have some regionalisms.
supposedly
 
I still can't get over the demise of Broadcast English here.
 
2:28 PM
Not estuary though.
@tchrist Do you think that's going away in the US?
Newscasters are more ... familiar, let us say.
 
@Mitch They let people speak on the air who have the damned COT–CAUGHT merger. Always throws me.
Broadcast English does not merge those.
 
Oh. Never noticed.
 
People say gahn and lahg and dahg and I notice plenty.
thaht
 
Having migrated to the Northeast, most people are still accentless, but every so often a born and bred local's lack of r's will really stand out. But that's it.
it's not common
 
What's going on is that the shift in acceptable accents from New York and Chicago to Los Angeles.
 
2:33 PM
We haven't had this conversation before have we?
I'm pretty sure not.
 
sun under new nothing
 
We certainly have had the conversation before about having had conversations before, surely, but not about this conversation.
 
People didn't use to get to talk with an LA accent.
On the air.
 
@tchrist That can't be a thing. SNL really exaggerates a lot of things.
 
But you can't retrain a million el-cheapo waiters-turned-actors.
 
2:35 PM
OK maybe COT/CAUGHT merger
 
that
 
Valley girl speak never went away, it took over everything else.
@tchrist I thought KarlG's answer was pretty good. It really is the northern cities shift.
So, @tchrist and @Cerberus, do you have any suggestions for interesting question motivators?
 
I grew up with Shkawgo
 
@tchrist I can't tell any more for myself. I've repeated all these subtle variations over and over, they all sound just as likely.
I can't tell if I used to say lightning bug or firefly.
 
Well, there's also Shkahgo.
I might not even be consistent.
 
2:40 PM
cut the grass or mow the lawn. (but definitely not either of the switches of those two)
 
Although I know is there's no damned "i" in that word, no more so than there is in Mwawkee.
Cutting the grass is what farmers do to make hay. Regular people mow the lawn.
 
@Mitch Hello. What do you mean by "question motivators"?
 
@tchrist Oh yeah. BUt what is this 'tchi-kah-go' thing? people seem to affricate often
@Cerberus my meta question
 
@Mitch That's fucked up.
 
about making more good questions
 
2:42 PM
Sounds like a native Spanish speaker.
 
@tchrist I'd call them losers instead of idiots. But yeah.
@tchrist like someone who comes from tshi-cah-go is a tshi-cah-no?
 
@Mitch Oh, it's hard.
I'm not much of an asker.
And I usually don't get answers on SE sites that help me very much, except in cases where I could have looked it up myself.
 
@Cerberus I feel like the news is a great motivator for questions. And eventually they get covered but sometimes I feel like someone says something that others in the news comment on, but then there's no mention of it on ELU for a while.
@Cerberus Yes, that is a problem for me as well.
 
Yes, the news is good.
Or literature.
 
@Cerberus It's hard to ask authentically, when you feel like you could have done the research yourself, or you kinda know the answer already.
@Cerberus eg take one random sentence from Finnegan's wake and ask 'WTH'
 
2:53 PM
@Mitch Yeah, and we have lots of questions anyway, so there's no danger of having the site closed because of that.
On Latin, I do try to ask questions for this reason.
And it's somewhat easier.
 
Oh, my concern wasn't traffic numbers. It's quality.
To be honest, I think most of the questions are not interesting. At all.
 
@Mitch Yes, especially since English at an academic level revolves around literature.
For literature is the most interesting language.
@Mitch Yeah, oh, well.
You can just ignore the ones that aren't interesting.
 
haha
sigh
 
@Cerberus Tell that to the flaggers. :)
Custom moderator flag: this question bores me
 
Solution: ignore the flaggers.
 
2:59 PM
'Custom moderator flag: ignore this flag'
Done!
 
3:11 PM
Good!
 
3:30 PM
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Q: Is there a word for the spatial equivalent of contemporary?

colorlaceFrom dictionary.com contemporary: happening, existing, living, or coming into being during the same period of time I'm looking for something that means existing in the same place, but not necessarily in the same time. "Neighboring" is close, but it seems to imply both spatial proximity a...

 

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