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1:27 AM
@Mitch @CowperKettle Greek oulê is a wound or scar.
2
The normal translitteration of Greek ou is Latin u.
Cf. ou-topia "non-place" → utopia*.
 
 
2 hours later…
3:07 AM
Thank you!
What is Second Sunday?
The Second Sunday of Easter is the day that occurs seven days after the Christian celebration of Easter. Those churches which give special significance to this day recognize it by various names. In the Roman Catholic Church, this day is generally known as Divine Mercy Sunday. Across Western Christianity more broadly, this day is also known as the Octave Day of Easter, White Sunday (Latin: Dominica in albis), Quasimodo Sunday, Bright Sunday, and Low Sunday. In Eastern Christianity, this day is known as Antipascha, New Sunday (or Renewal Sunday), and Thomas Sunday. == Biblical account == The Second...
 
@CowperKettle Maybe he's keeping an Advent calendar. :)
Very very early.
> Sunday, December 5
Second Sunday of Advent 2021
Yes, that's it.
But it's still Saturday so I was confused.
Probably not for him though.
I can never keep these floating holidays straight. Celebrating the birth of the holy yule log and mighty mistletoe on the same day is weird.
Advent is before St Christmas.
 
 
3 hours later…
6:10 AM
@CowperKettle This one has been gradding almost a week. I know what gradding probably means but I’m wondering where it comes from.
 
6:37 AM
@Xanne From dragging
I'm making a lot of typos ))
Adam Ondra on El Capitan
El Capitan (Spanish: El Capitán; The Captain or The Chief) is a vertical rock formation in Yosemite National Park, located on the north side of Yosemite Valley, near its western end. The granite monolith is about 3,000 feet (914 m) from base to summit along its tallest face and is a popular objective for rock climbers. == Naming == The formation was named "El Capitan" by the Mariposa Battalion when they explored the valley in 1851. El Capitán ("the captain", "the chief") was taken to be a loose Spanish translation of the local Native American name for the cliff, variously transcribed as "To-to...
There are only three people who have climbed the Dawn Wall – Tommy Caldwell, Kevin Jorgeson and Adam Ondra.
In rock climbing and ice climbing, a pitch is a steep section of a route that requires a rope between two belays, as part of a climbing system. Standard climbing ropes are between 50 and 80 metres long, so a pitch is always shorter, between two convenient ledges if possible; longer routes are multi-pitch, requiring the re-use of the rope each time. In free climbing, pitch refers to classification by climbers of the difficulty of ascent on certain climbing routes. == Climbing == In advanced climbing or mountaineering, another definition of pitch is not restricted by the length of the rope. On easier...
 
7:09 AM
@RegDwigнt Here's an example of Greek-like acceleration of a chorus song in Ukrainian:
When I first listened to this song, I instantly thought "it's just like in that Greek song" )))
Oh, it was 5 years ago when I first heard it.
I then managed to translate the first stanza ))
 
7:45 AM
 
8:43 AM
I accidentally drank a bottle of invisible ink last night.

I'm in the hospital now, waiting to be seen.
 
 
2 hours later…
10:27 AM
In the Christian and Islamic traditions, the Seven Sleepers, otherwise known as the Sleepers of Ephesus and Companions of the Cave, is a medieval legend about a group of youths who hid inside a cave outside the city of Ephesus around AD 250 to escape one of the Roman persecutions of Christians and emerged some 300 years later. Another version of the story appears in the Quran (18:9–26). It was also translated into Persian, Kyrgyz, and Tatar.The earliest version of this story comes from the Syrian bishop Jacob of Serugh (c. 450–521), which is itself derived from an earlier Greek source, now lost...
 
10:58 AM
Etna explosion by Fernando Famiani, 2015
Word of the day: comeuppance (The British disputed fiercely among themselves about who deserved credit for giving the Germans a belated comeuppance.)
 
 
3 hours later…
2:01 PM
@MattE.Эллен: Do Brits in the main not care about the pronunciation of foreign languages? Lawler made that observation a while back and I wondered about it then. But now I see David Bennett, YouTuber and musician, utterly hacking his way through pronunciations like this one:
At the time indicated he refers to the song "Tous Les Maux D'Amour" as "Tooz Lay More Day More" and just seconds later the singer renders it with the correct pronunciation.
Now, I know this man has a careful ear for music, and I respect his musicianship and general acumen in other things. I'm having a hard time squaring that with his horrible pronunciations. Maybe pronouncing French (or another language) the way the native speakers the language would is somehow unseemly for your countrymen?
It's not just David Bennett, of course. I've noticed it in other British speakers.
 
2:39 PM
@Robusto It's because of people thinking that the mapping of letters to sounds from their own language is the same in all languages that use those same letters. They are not used to the idea of there being rules they don't know. This is not limited to the Brits, nor even to English. English just makes it worse. Italians and Spaniards seldom mispronounce each other's words, but Portuguese and Spaniards will often do so. French may as well be Hungarian.
 
@Cerberus or u-biquitous
Or u-haul
 
no you
 
Ubetcha
 
That's not your native language pokin' through there, eh.
 
Euknowit
 
2:42 PM
inode it
 
@tchrist Yes, but when I hear Americans hacking their way through French it is done with considerably less confidence. Bennett marches confidently forward with his hackery, as though there were no question at all about it.
 
Yeah the English don't have a monopoly on ethnocentrism
 
I think they think this is ok. I don't know why. It may be a political statement, as you see it from the know-nothing right more often than from the sybarite left.
 
When Bojo the Clown mimes French words using a working-class accent from the UK, he's sotto voce telling them how little he cares about their delicate Gallic hypersensitivities
 
2:47 PM
"Ho ho ho" is Hungarian for "snow, snow, snow"
 
@tchrist That was what I was driving at.
 
@tchrist wait wait wait
How do you -mime- an accent?
@tchrist maybe he's translating culturally too?
 
@tchrist It rather reminds me of Brendan Gill's assessment of the New Yorker mascot, Eustace Tilley, a fop in top hat viewing a butterfly through his monocle with, as Gill puts it, "an interest so mild as to border on contempt."
 
@Mitch Very palimpsestically, with face paints and imaginary boxes of words that are not there.
 
Also is that 'bo-joe' or 'bo-ho'?
 
2:50 PM
@Mitch You use the verb form of mime: "1. To ridicule by imitation; mimic."
 
@CowperKettle Welsh word is again an outlier, just as I found for nightingale.
 
I was just thinking of how you could possibly express vowel changes by the way you hold your elbows when being trapped in an invisible box
 
@Mitch Nasalization is phonemic in French.
 
So the clown beeps his own nose for 'un bon bon blanc'?
 
@tchrist Because of the marches, Wales was hard to occupy for the Brits, thus it retained a degree of uniqueness
The Welsh Marches (Welsh: Y Mers) is an imprecisely defined area along the border between England and Wales in the United Kingdom. The precise meaning of the term has varied at different periods. The English term Welsh March (in Medieval Latin Marchia Walliae) was originally used in the Middle Ages to denote the marches between England and the Principality of Wales, in which Marcher lords had specific rights, exercised to some extent independently of the king of England. In modern usage, "the Marches" is often used to describe those English counties which lie along the border with Wales,...
 
2:55 PM
@CowperKettle But why is it so Slavic looking?
The snow word, I mean.
 
'mark' is a border area from Germanic
 
kira
(They have only hard C's in Welsh.)
 
@Mitch Hence the French term marquis - for nobles who protected border areas.
 
Also Wales was occupied by the Normans very early on
 
@tchrist In Wales, the word for snow is Slavic-looking?
 
2:58 PM
@Mitch So the Riddermark is when you get a puzzlingly poor score on a quiz that doesn't count against your final grade?
@CowperKettle Orthographic transliteration fail: Compare Welsh cira with Ukrainian сніг read as it were "cheer" not "snih". :)
 
Oh I read that first statement as marsh and I couldn't imagine any possible marshlike areas between England and Wales
 
@Mitch Vikingssons.
@Mitch No no no. Sigh.
 
It is eira
 
I hate bad fonts.
TIL Ireland is snowy.
Nov 30 at 16:53, by tchrist
> GK: aēdṓn (ἀηδών)
EL: aïdóni (αηδόνι)
HU: csalogány
CY: eos
NL: nachtegaal
DE: Nachtigall
SV: näktergal
DK: nattergal
NO: nattergal
EN: nightingale
LB: Nuechtegall
RO: privighetoare
FR: rossignol
CA: rossinyol
CL: rousinol
PT: rouxinol
ES: ruiseñor
FI: satakieli
CS: slavík
PO: słowik
RU: solovey (соловей)
IT: usignolo
CY is Welsh.
They have eos for the nightingale. Where the hell that came from, I have no idea.
 
My friend, 50 yo, spent 20 days being ill with covid, but is fully recovered now. They took him to hospital twice in an ambulance to scan his lungs, and registered a 20% damage, but his blood oxygenation was perfect, so they always brought him back home. And now he's fine. He never vaccinated.
 
3:04 PM
Lucky to live.
You hear too many stories like those that have grimmer outcomes than your friend's.
 
Antivaxxers are everywhere in Russia, you need to be a hermit not to have several of them as friends.
> When used as a verb (to snow), it becomes either bwrw eira or pluo eira. The latter literally means “it’s feathering snow” which makes sense since the Welsh refer to snowflakes as snow feathers (plu(f) eira).
bwrw is glorified booroo
 
Plovers are birds. :)
Vulgar Latin had a plovere for to rain.
It was a proto-Romance / Common Romance transition form between Classical Latin pluere and the modern Romance forms IT piovere, FR pleuvoir, ES llover, PT chover. And of course EN pluvious.
 
> Avtostroi Ford Plant, Gorkii, USSR, c. 1930.
 
heh
@Robusto It was 67 again here yesterday, and had been 72 for a couple days. I awoke to 50 but with some wind. I believe it will break 60 again today before plunging to 16 overnight. Still no moisture though.
 
3:29 PM
@tchrist Going to be mid-60s here today. It's been very mild of late.
 
The ground has been totally bricked by this continued dry spell. I guess clay does that.
Tried to stick something in the ground yesterday and the shovel refused.
I'm filling the birdfeeders today, bears be damned. The birds know it will freeze hard tonight.
 
How often do bears hit your feeders?
 
@Mitch Uhh that's Latin.
 
@Robusto October was bad. They had best be gone by now. But the coonie minibears are forever.
@Cerberus Mitch played truant during the day they covered ubi sub ubi in grammar school because he was reared in the hot south and didn't want to be forced to always wear underwear.
 
3:46 PM
I forgot what that meant.
 
It's an old cod Latin joke, or dog Latin, or whatever you call those, from back when studying Latin was compulsory. Because ubi = where and sub = under, the English wordwise translation of the nonsense ubi sub ubi phrase sounds a bit like wear underwear, especially if you have the WEATHER–WHETHER merger.
I believe that that merge is now dominant in all regions except for the American South and Scotland. I know we were taught as young children that the "right" way to say WH- words was to preserve the distinction, but nobody ever cared outside formal choral singing.
Because it was considered "standard" even though it has now become regional, you do still sometimes hear it in US&UK "newscasters of gravitas" (read: older and more serious ones) from regions where it is not native but whose formal educations imprinted it into them.
The pronunciation of the digraph ⟨wh⟩ in English has changed over time, and still varies today between different regions and accents. It is now most commonly pronounced /w/, the same as a plain initial ⟨w⟩, although some dialects, particularly those of Scotland, Ireland, and the Southern United States, retain the traditional pronunciation /hw/, generally realized as [ʍ], a voiceless "w" sound. The process by which the historical /hw/ has become /w/ in most modern varieties of English is called the wine–whine merger. It is also referred to as glide cluster reduction. Before rounded vowels, a different...
So like you'll hear Stephen Fry saying wh- but he's not Scottish.
It may have been part of formal RP indoctrination for him; I don't know. I know they tried to do the same to us of that same generation here.
Oh here's something funny: in my dialect the common name for pertussis and the common name for Grus americana both start with simple /h/ like who does but in many dialects whooping cough and whooping crane start with simple /w/ instead. I never realized that until I started hearing people talk from far away. I wonder if anyone says /hw/ there anywhere.
 
4:06 PM
@tchrist That digraph used to be reversed once upon a time: hw instead of wh.
Which would explain the loss of the aspirant.
 
We also still spell things wr- but there's no longer a phonemic distinction between /r/ and some pre-rounded version, since they all seem pre-rounded word-initially to me.
But I don't think OE hr- persists as rh- anywhere in English; I think that spelling comes only from Greek in modern spelling.
I don't know the origins of Rhone the river though.
Even rhubarb which we grafted into Middle English from French is "probably < Hellenistic Greek ῥῆον βάρβαρον < ῥῆον rhubarb (see Rheum n.2) + ancient Greek βάρβαρον , neuter of βάρβαρος".
> < Anglo-Norman and Middle French reubarbe, Middle French rubarbe, rebarbe (French rhubarbe ; in Middle French also reu barbare ) rhubarb, plant of the genus Rheum (13th cent. in Old French) < post-classical Latin reubarbarum , rheubarbarum (a636 in Isidore; 13th cent. in British sources; also rubarbera (1480)), probably < Hellenistic Greek ῥῆον βάρβαρον < ῥῆον rhubarb (see Rheum n.2) + ancient Greek βάρβαρον , neuter of βάρβαρος (see barbarous adj.). Compare post-classical Latin reubarbum (13th cent. in British sources; also rybarba (1365)), Old Occitan reubarbe (13th cent.), Catalan ruib
Yeah ok, the river is also from Greek.
> Etymology: < the name of the river Rhône (French Rhône ; classical Latin Rhodanus , Rodanus , ancient Greek Ῥοδανός ), which runs from Switzerland through south-eastern France to the Mediterranean Sea. The river name is probably ultimately of Celtic origin. With Rhone wine compare French vin du Rhône (18th cent. or earlier).
At least, it's thought to have come through Ancient Greek to Latin. The "probably ultimately of Celtic origin" wouldn't be easily seen in the orthography.
The Spanish word for a whooping crane uses trompetera, so trumpeting, trumpeter.
This is interesting: grúa now means only a mechanical crane in Spanish. For the bird, they now spell that grulla only, and so pronounce it somewhat differently.
They used to use grua for both.
And cranberries were craneberries — in Dutch only.
We stole it from Dutch at the time, apparently. Modern Dutch doesn't call them that.
> The name appears to have been adopted by the North American colonists from some Low German source, and brought to England with the American cranberries ( V. macrocarpon), imported already in 1686, when Ray ( Hist. Pl. 685) says of them ‘hujus baccas a Nova Anglia usque missas Londini vidimus et gustavimus. Scriblitis seu ortis (Tarts nostrates vocant) eas inferciunt’.

Thence it began to be applied in the 18th cent. to the British species ( V. Oxycoccos). In some parts, where the latter is unknown, the name is erroneously given to the cowberry ( V. Vitis Idæa).
> Etymology: A name of comparatively recent appearance in English; entirely unknown to the herbalists of 16–17th cent., who knew the plant and fruit as marsh-whorts , fen-whorts , fen-berries , marsh-berries , moss-berries . Several varieties of the name occur in continental languages, as German kranichbeere , kranbeere , Low German krônbere , krones- or kronsbere , krônsbär , kranebere (all meaning crane-berry ); compare also Swedish tranbär , Danish tranebær , < trana , trane , crane.
I wish they were still called fenberries; it is more descriptive to me than the hidden cranberry morpheme is.
Sometimes also mooseberries because of the moose's affinity for grazing in the fens and marshes.
These days I would expect a mooseberry to be a euphemism for their excrement. :)
Dutch seems to mostly call them fenberries now: veenbes. But I wouldn't know.
Here in the semi-to-super-arid Four Corners region of the American Southwest, fens are rarer than hen's teeth. Cranberries too, but we do have blueberries at higher elevations.
No fens, no peat.
No fence, more pronghorn. :)
 
4:34 PM
 
@CowperKettle Gas stations sometimes sell bait for fishermen in regions known for that.
 
We have a popular worm stall in Yekaterinburg
Named Kozyavochnaya
Kozyavka is a kiddish slang word for bug
 
Cosy worms. :)
 
The ones on the lower right are probably from the Worms computer game ))
 
haha
A pronghorn seems to be closer to a giraffe than to a deer. Cladistically.
> Antelope comprise a wastebasket taxon (miscellaneous group) within the family Bovidae,[1] encompassing all Old World ruminants that are not bovines, caprines, deer, or giraffes. One New World species, the pronghorn of North America, is sometimes colloquially referred to as the "American antelope", but they are more distantly related to the Giraffidae family. The "true antelope" are the gazelle, Nanger, Eudorcas and Antilope.[2]
"wastebasket taxon"
Sounds like a junk drawer.
I wonder why they didn't say are not bovines, caprines, cervines, or giraffes.
I guess you can have giraffines from the adjective, but I've never heard it as a noun.
Maybe it's the same with cervine not producing a noun. Instead we use -id and so have cervids and giraffids.
 
4:46 PM
In the future, you could be able to determine if someone is capable of empathy by running some tests.
 
So it's not their fault they're a bastard? :)
 
Should we then introduce some limits for non-empathic persons wishing to run for a president?
@tchrist Of course not
That does not absolve them from punishment.
It was not Hitler's fault that he started extermination of Jews, Slavs and Romas, but that does not absolve him.
 
Oh I do think he had mens rea here, not just a nervous problem. :)
 
I don't think he had some disease ))
Mens rea (; Law Latin for "guilty mind") is the mental element of a person's intention to commit a crime; or knowledge that one's action or lack of action would cause a crime to be committed. It is a necessary element of many crimes. The standard common law test of criminal liability is expressed in the Latin phrase actus reus non facit reum nisi mens sit rea, i.e. "the act is not culpable unless the mind is guilty". As a general rule, someone who acted without mental fault is not liable in criminal law. Exceptions are known as strict liability crimes. Moreover, when a person intends a harm, but...
 
Culpability follows from mens rea, at least legally.
 
4:50 PM
Yes, he was culpable. But in his place, with his genes and upbringing, I would do the same.
And then I would be culpable.
I just got lucky to have a different set of genes
 
@CowperKettle So you're saying Homo sum, humani nihil a me alienum puto?
The things of all men are alien to no man.
 
Yes ))
I listened to a dozen books on WWII, and looks like they just did what other regimes did, but only at a more efficient level.
Ukrainian Cossacks murdered whole villages of Jews in the 17th century.
Given some gas chambers, they would have used them.
 
Yes, I don't think we can ever put what happened in the gas chambers behind us. Because it derives from our basic human nature, it will recur.
So too will there always be cases where an elected body willingly hands all power over to a populist dictator. Classical civilization was quite familiar with that concept. Only this generation has forgotten how easily that happens, and so they are the one pushing for it.
 
Early 19th century folklore researchers were good persons, but they created an anime version of nationalism, in which your own nationality is represented with big starry eyes, flowery outfits, beautiful songs; and some other nationalities are full of tentacles and are nasty.
 
Is that what fairytales are then?
And monsters, even.
 
4:58 PM
I had this general feeling from listening to books, that nationalism arose in early 19th century when people living in towns got enamored with this anime versions of nationalism.
 
National myths related to a nation's foundation are a very powerful device.
So too are other national myths.
 
Yes, and politicians found a good use to them. And started paying good money to all the folklorists and musicians and so forth.
The Soviet poet Mayakovsky, "the singer of the Revolution", started out as a propaganda worker in Tsarist Russia
 
National myths shape national identities.
These can be used for many hidden purposes. The Texans are extremely careful about their own founding myth being shown to be such because they they know how ugly things could get if the truth were taught.
 
Russia's General Prosecutor's Office has just launched an investigation into two leading rap musicians of Russia. Just a week ago two other musicians fled from Russia.
Will they go after rock musicians after there are no rappers left LOL
@tchrist Russian politicians point at Texas to justify Russia's annexation of Crimea
Since Texans wanted to separate from Mexico, and did that, and then got accepted into the USA
Just like Crimea
 
Wasn't Virgil's Aeneid just another propaganda piece from Augustus, who definitely knew something about creating an enduring empire.
 
5:07 PM
I only heard about Aeneid, never read it ))
 
@CowperKettle Because slavery was illegal in Mexico.
@CowperKettle It's mostly just Homeric fan-fiction. :)
 
@tchrist Yes, I first learned about this from some story or book written by Kurt Vonnegut. If I recall correctly
 
The Texans wanted freedom from the Mexican laws that stopped them from owning human beings and getting rich off the lashes' stripes upon their backs.
 
This is why the South creates myths about its history.
Because the truth is monstrous.
 
5:11 PM
> Americans and Canadians envy Russians due to their superior working conditions (Headline of the Russian Information Agency, the chief state news agency)
 
Never heard that one.
 
RIA Novosti, the news agency, is famous for such headlines. They use comments left by some "Americans" on US news sites to prove this or that point.
For some reasons they also love to produce news based on some comments by Bulgarians. "Bulgarians are enthusiastic about *** in Russia"
 
Softening folks up.
 
The news usually goes like "A Bulgarian news site user with the nickname 123KJKJD said that Russia is outstanding".
So the current running joke in comments section of any mishap and catastrophe is "Are Bulgarians enthusing already?"
In the Soviet Union, many newspapers had a section titled "Letters to the Editor" or something.
In many cases these letters were composed by newspapre staff.
It's a good time-honored tradition in Russia.
Russian doctor writes: "The snow cover is here, and first victims of snow tubes have started arriving in intensive care".
They say that every winter they treat horrible spine injuries and bone injuries from snowtubbing.
> Means of abortion, if the time from pregnancy conception is.. 4 weeks, 4 months, 4 years.
 
6:05 PM
Apr 4 '17 at 17:07, by Mitch
@tchrist semper ubi sub ubi
 
6:51 PM
> Who has no aim but to forget
Be left in peace, be lying thus
For days, for years, for centuries yet,
Unshaven and anonymous;
 
 
3 hours later…
10:03 PM
If you were going to design a chess-playing android, you could do worse than to model him on Maurice Ashley.
 
10:16 PM
Maurice Ashley (born March 6, 1966) is a Jamaican-American chess grandmaster, author, and commentator. In 1999, he earned the grandmaster title (GM), making him the first black person to attain the title of grandmaster.Ashley is well known as a commentator for high-profile chess events. He also spent many years teaching chess. On April 13, 2016, Ashley was inducted into the US Chess Hall of Fame. == Early life == Ashley was born in St. Andrew, Jamaica. He attended Wolmer's Boys School in Jamaica, and then moved to the United States when he was 12.He went to Brooklyn Technical High School. Ashley...
 
11:02 PM
@Robusto The bottom suddenly fell out a half an hour ago. ^^^^
It instantly went from shorts weather to gloves weather with a wicked, wicked wind.
Wind chill was only 9F.
 

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