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12:10 AM
@CowperKettle What exactly is a "Plant Hardiness Zone" and what does the scale mean? Not a very clear presentation there.
 
12:43 AM
@Robusto Looks like USDA zones.
 
0
Q: Is the term "morbid curiosity" generally negative or positive?

Anthony LoPrimoIn my experience, someone who asks things out of "morbid curiosity" generally seems to do so for the "sake of fulfilling their curiosity" with no other motivation beyond boredom, a random thought (lol ADHD), and so on. However looking it up, the term seems to refer with an obsession with morbid t...

 
@Xanne Check the morbidity and mortality report. Seldom positive.
 
You would think these people never read a book. “Morbid curiosity”, positive or negative, oh, that’s just a matter of opinion.
 
@tchrist In other news, I'm getting my Covid booster shot on Saturday.
 
@Robusto Mine was only Saturday in Europe, Friday night in Colorado.
 
12:49 AM
It will be a drive-through. Zip the window down and bang, in the arm.
Couldn't be simpler.
 
I had fever for a few days. Didn't get a chance to rest properly till last night.
 
I might have to cancel my Sunday ride.
 
That would be my expectation.
But a friend who just got his booster had no symptoms following it at all even though the second dose had hit him like a freight train. He also had had covid proper, including the long syndrome, prior to vaccine availability.
He just buried his recalcitrant/inveterate/obdurate Floridian sister-in-law, who didn't believe in the virus because she was a Republican. But it believed in her.
Familiar?
Last night at nightfall.
@Robusto You and I live now in a desert, sere and harsh, at times even deadly to the unwary stranger. But standing on the golden shores of our continent’s vital aorta, life’s bounty seems embarrassingly fecund and inviting. Here is beauty so deep, so rich, so warm, it takes your breath and leaves an unexpected tear of awe and joy
I have real pictures, too, not these latterday polaroids, but those I have not processed yet, and they are not so readily available for display here.
 
1:05 AM
@tchrist I agree.
 
It is the Great River herself, of course. Upon this continent there is none like her.
 
Reminds me of the end of American Beauty.
> I guess I could be pretty pissed off about what happened to me... but it's hard to stay mad, when there's so much beauty in the world. Sometimes I feel like I'm seeing it all at once, and it's too much, my heart fills up like a balloon that's about to burst... And then I remember to relax, and stop trying to hold on to it, and then it flows through me like rain and I can't feel anything but gratitude for every single moment of my stupid little life...
You have no idea what I'm talking about, I'm sure. But don't worry... you will someday.
 
A full two miles wide she spans, and this far above where the Ohio and the Missouri and the Arkansas hurrying to the sea bring her all the drops that fall for thousands of miles west across most of our country.
 
@tchrist We should share photos of our respective deserts sometime. They are really gorgeous.
 
I was pretty wrecked from driving a thousand miles on vaccine rebound and no sleep, But that sunset scene made it all disappear.
Boulder at the edge of the Rockies is far greener than the dry steppes of Nebraska, yet it is still a desert compared to Iowa and Illinois and Wisconsin.
 
1:12 AM
@tchrist It has that ability.
 
The high plains cannot really support croplands. They barely support ranchlands.
 
I was driving all night through Pennsylvania once, and when I got to the middle of the state, out in the middle of nowhere, I saw the sun rise like a pale slice of melon in cottage-cheese clouds, and I just had to stop and let it all wash over me.
 
The color is marvelous here now, and even the color in Boulder is richer than I have ever seen it there. I think because of all the rain we had in the spring.
Yes, like that. I had to stop. I might never pass that way again, and it was too magical a moment,.
 
Taken yesterday.
 
Red!
A rare color in the west.
 
1:16 AM
Red-orange, but yeah.
Nothing as deep as red-maple red.
But fire.
You have the yellow aspens up near you.
 
Sometimes they can be red-orange. Rarely, but striking.
But that was today, and not Em the Great but just Lake Geneva. Hard to tell the difference in that shot though.
 
Nice.
 
1:38 AM
Some of the oaks in Lake Geneva are turning fiery red right now, and of course the red maples.
 
1:51 AM
@Mitch uh, but I don't think I do anymore. I mean, I realize my username is my initials and I did have an initial fetish back when I was 16 or something. Right now though, probably not
 
@tchrist We had an oak in Massachusetts, two red maples, a cherry tree, and a Japanese maple. Also a couple of silver maples.
 
2:13 AM
This cumulative emissions: not yearly emissions.
You could see it as 'total green house debt'.
I'm surprised at how low Australia is, and how high South Africa.
 
2:38 AM
@RegDwigнt Consider me influenced.
Will you record yourself playing it?
 
3:31 AM
@Robusto Yes, it's the USDA zones, seem a handy way to look at weather patterns
 
 
2 hours later…
5:19 AM
@CowperKettle The BBC says Russians are going on holiday during the shutdown.
@RegDwigнt Did you get your large Lego project built? I have forgotten what it was. The Titanic is not yet available.
 
 
1 hour later…
6:30 AM
@Xanne Yes, right
 
 
1 hour later…
7:45 AM
> An inexpensive repurposed drug called fluvoxamine can save the lives of COVID-19 patients and cut hospital admissions by up to 30 percent, says a study co-led by McMaster University.
Curious. An antidepressant.
Statisticians expect October 2021 to be the deadliest month for Russians since the spring of 1945.
The chart is Mean daily deaths of all causes in Russia (without Crimea)
 
 
3 hours later…
10:41 AM
@M.A.R. I think it's a phase we all go through sometime in our youth... but now that I think of it, when I was a kid, it was the middle aged adults that wanted to have everything monogrammed or have their initials embossed or etched in something valuable, or somehow on vanity license plates.
 
11:23 AM
A typical fruit stall
Selling besoms and bath brooms. The besoms are straw-colored, the bath-brooms are greenleaf-colored
Or maybe the more common term is not besom but broom.
> With a soft besom will I sweep your halls,
And brush a web or two from off the walls.
> Quote: "The song Buy Broom Buzzems (by William Purvis 1752–1832) still refers to the "broom besom" as one type of besom (i.e. "a besom made from broom")."
 
11:41 AM
 
 
1 hour later…
12:43 PM
Word of the day: inion
> The inion (ἰνίον, iníon, Greek for the occipital bone) is used as a landmark in the 10-20 system in electroencephalography (EEG) recording. Extending laterally from it on either side is the superior nuchal line, and above it is the faintly marked highest nuchal line.
 
1:30 PM
@CowperKettle 'besom' is not ... well, I've never heard it before. A quick google search makes it sound like it's a special Scots word.
 
 
3 hours later…
4:16 PM
> Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt have now discovered a neural code for spatial goals, demonstrating the existence of the brain's goal map guiding us toward a remote destination over space and time. medicalxpress.com/news/…
> Our work points to a parallel internal map system in the brain that focuses more on representing a destination rather than transient locations traversed by the animal during navigation.
The Orbitofrontal cortex maintains the overall goal of travel.
 
4:41 PM
@Mitch I kept reading that "bosom" and wondered how's that exclusively scottish
@Cerberus so essentially this pissing contest between the world's largest economies is ruining the planet already, we don't need a nuclear fallout for that to happen
 

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