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12:07 AM
@Cerberus Which words are you objecting to? To me it sounds like the (un)natural pronunciations of classical vocalists everywhere. It's how one sounds when one has opened one's trachea and is using it as a sounding chamber. The syllables are all fatter and rounder than one would produce in normal speech or popular music.
 
12:18 AM
@RegDwigнt Nice. It sounds like you've been working harder and better. Lots of nice little treats for the ear in there.
 
12:32 AM
The little tricks you do to keep away from resolving to the tonic are very tinkling to my ear.
I especially enjoyed the part starting at ~42 where you go, if I understand the progression correctly, from D7 to D7sus6 resolving to C7 to Csus6 back to D7, and then when you arrive at G minor it doesn't even feel like a resolution, just another step along the way.
Very nice. Is there a way to download that as a PDF so I could print it out and play (and play with) it a little? I feel like adding a little shameless rubato.
 
 
2 hours later…
2:16 AM
@Robusto She uses a 'throat' R in some places where I suspect it isn't warranted (that is, it sounded odd to me). Even once at the beginning of a syllable, Tritt I think.
And she pronounced Gefährte as though it had no Umlaut, I think. And she seemed to pronounce some schwas as /ɛ/, if I remember correctly.
I mean, she gets most things right by far. She gets the ü right, for example.
But e.g. Ian Bostridge does it better, also a native speaker of English.
Even so, I think I prefer her performance!
 
> Let full gratitude now prompt the tear
Which erst did sorrow force to flow.
 
Better.
@RegDwigнt Will listen!
 
2:56 AM
Mister Yoda is silly.
> I'm swapping something, but I'm not sure what or why. Any diagnoses or description so I can rectify this would be appreciated!
The idea that a native speaker need rectify anything in these constructions being purely suppository, you may safely put it behind you with no harm done. :) — tchrist ♦ 1 min ago
 
@tchrist Well, they could be improved upon, could they not?
 
3:25 AM
@Cerberus Sure, but they aren't wrong.
 
@tchrist Not wrong as in soloecisms, no.
 
4:23 AM
Russian breakfast
 
@CowperKettle I like!
What's in the pan, exactly?
 
@Cerberus Looks like some meat or pork fat
Or maybe potatoes?
I'm on a low-fat diet, so it's not my picture ))
The UK will now fortify flour with B9
The human brain can't properly process upside-down faces
 
5:00 AM
> FDA committee votes in favor of granting emergency use authorization for Pfizer's Covid-19 vaccine in children ages 5 to 11
 
 
3 hours later…
8:22 AM
If not for Putin's help, who transfers money taken out of Russians' pockets to his friend Lukashekno, the Belarusian dictator would have been dangling in the noose already.
They are like Hitler and Mussolini, two murderers helping each other out.
 
@CowperKettle now you've said that I can see the mouth and eyes are upside down
or right way up
 
8:53 AM
> Allowing Nord Stream 2 to pump Russian gas to Germany will not threaten supplies to the European Union, the German Economy Ministry said on Tuesday, clearing a major hurdle for the disputed pipeline. reuters.com/business/energy/…
Europe. Appeasing murderous dictators since forever.
 
9:18 AM
heyo
 
9:57 AM
A squirrel saw me jogging
 
10:57 AM
Word of the day: Epicurian Swerve
> Epicurus deviated from Democritus by proposing the idea of atomic "swerve", which holds that atoms may deviate from their expected course, thus permitting humans to possess free will in an otherwise deterministic universe.
 
@M.A.R. haha. just messing with you. -Everybody- has a fetish for their own initials/name/etc.
 
Based on this, companies should create brand names that sound like the most common names.
Like Thomson
Or Smith
Word of the minute: hylozoism (the philosophical point of view that matter is in some sense alive)
Russian journalist Alexey Kovalyov was reading a Telegram channel about the Universe and space, and came across a totally tin-foil-hat post against vaccination, inviting readers over to channel maintained by "scientist Olga Chetverikova"
Another jounralist, Ilya Klishin, wrote that Olga Chetverikova was one of his university teachers. She taught Western Culture, and besides was expatiating on "masons" and telling that "CIA handed over a force crystal to The Beatles, after which this rock group started worshipping Satan".
She was a university teacher at MGIMO, one of the most hard-to-enroll and prestigious universities of Russia. It's a foreign affairs university that produces international diplomatic workers.
I remember some weird university teachers too.
 
11:59 AM
Thankfully, Liubov Sobol is in the West, she fled Russia.
Mr. Prigozhin is a criminal who did time in the USSR for gang activity.
He is a close friend of Putin, who made him into a billionaire on state-funded contracts.
Prigozhin tried to kill Liubov Sobol's husband.
In the photo, Prigozhin is first from the left
 
 
3 hours later…
3:06 PM
 
 
3 hours later…
5:48 PM
> If you look like your passport photo, you're too ill to travel.
 
Fair point.
 
Where does the modern English word initial 'p' come from?
I'm trying to answer a 'why this one word can't be derived from this other one' just because I feel like it.
and I think all word initial 'p' in English came from a Romance borrowing.
Is that right?
 
Why would you think that?
 
I thought I could spit out a whole bunch of such pairs proving myself right but for some reason can't
@Cerberus because word inital p in PIE turns into f- in Germanic
 
The pot calls the kettle pink.
 
5:59 PM
and also examples
platus -> plate
pater -> paternal (that'a bit... invented)
 
@Mitch That doesn't mean Germanic couldn't have redeveloped its own p's later?
 
pirra -> pear
@Cerberus True, but I just can't come up with p words to prove wrong, or to support likelihood
pot comes from Old French etymonline.com/word/pot
presse (OF) -> press
pepper, poor, people all romance
 
@Mitch Noted!
How about pick?
 
pull put are germanic but etymonline doesn't give anything before... but still that should shut me up for the moment
but I won't let it
 
Pack?
 
6:05 PM
@Cerberus germanic
 
Pock?
Peck?
Puck?
Pit "seed"?
 
pin is germanic (and comes from p- in PIE so that's weird)
germanic
 
@Mitch Did this always happen?
Are you sure?
 
@Cerberus I thought that was a rule (pater -> father), but maybe it has context rules
 
@Cerberus that one is from Old English and cognate with Old Icelandic!
 
6:09 PM
@Mitch Pin could be from Latin pinna/penna "feather".
 
@Cerberus From the couple examples it can't be context free (because sometimes it goes to f sometimes to p)
 
@Mitch I don't know.
@MattE.Эллен Voilà!
 
> pin (n.)
late Old English pinn "peg or bolt of wood or metal used to hold things in place or fasten them together," from Proto-Germanic *penn- "jutting point or peak" (source also of Old Saxon pin "peg," Old Norse pinni "peg, tack," Middle Dutch pin "pin, peg," Old High German pfinn, German Pinne "pin, tack") __from Latin pinna__
"from latin pinna"
 
Well, my dictionary says "maybe from Latin".
And I think it is better than what Etymonline uses as its source.
 
so lots of borrowings into germanic from latin back in ...well... before the West Germanic split, or borrowed into each independently
 
6:11 PM
> Wrsch. verwant met: Oudiers benn ‘piek, hoorn’; Welsh ban ‘piek, punt’; < pie. *bend- ‘uitstekende punt’ (IEW 96). Mogelijk was de grondbetekenis ‘piek, punt’ (FvW, BDE, IEW); er zou dan verband kunnen bestaan met → pink ‘kleine vinger’.

Een andere mogelijkheid is dat het woord is ontleend aan Latijn penna, pinna ‘veer, pijl, tinne, vin’, zie → pen (Toll., Kluge). In het eerste geval heeft het woord later wel betekenissen van Latijn penna ontleend, en ook de nevenvorm pen zal onder invloed van het Latijn zijn ontstaan.
 
@Cerberus etymonline gets most of its stuff from OED, but it is never clear on when so and when not.
 
Yeah, and the OED often doesn't go back to Proto-Indo-European, and I think it may be outdated.
 
@Cerberus Yeah, pen- in Latin is the obvious cognate.
 
Yes, pen certainly.
But pin is uncertain.
 
so at least the first part of 'pig' could have come from a weird borrowing of 'pinguedo'
 
6:13 PM
Ah!
 
now the 'ng' part
 
What the why you asked.
Has the question been reopened yet?
 
@Cerberus Yeah it's open now
so. 'pinguo' in latin became penguo then maybe ... peigne in OF the paint in English.
so the latin would have to be borrowed more directly, not through French
 
pig comes from penguin? that's an evolutionary branch I did not expect.
 
so if pinguedo was borrowed in say the 9th c, would their be a sound change in English from -ng to -g?
@MattE.Эллен You see how round Penguins are?
I think my. point is made.
There's no sound change in Old English from word final -ng (velar nasal + velar stop if you really want it) to -g or -gge.
I state that without knowing anything.
wait
 
6:20 PM
@Mitch could have been Peppa Pingu in another universe
 
word final -g would have turned into -y before 1066
@MattE.Эллен How do. you know that we're not the other universe?
 
@Mitch +1!oneone
 
are there any word final -ng in OE, and if so, what became of them in ME?
 
@Mitch De Vaan is uncertain about the etymology of pinguis.
 
@Cerberus from before Latin?
 
6:21 PM
@Mitch And peignoir in French?
 
Philippa says big is possibly from a (non-Indo-European) substrate language.
 
@Robusto yes
 
@Mitch Yes.
@Robusto Maybe from piger?
 
@Cerberus big is a weird word in English
 
And where does penguin fit into all of this?
There's also Welsh pen (head) as in Uther Pendragon.
 
6:23 PM
criminy... I gotta run... please solve this for me while I'm gone. Also can you do P != NP? later dudes and dudettes.
 
That is settled science. P most definitely != NP. What can be constructed can be destructed.
But you may need a lot of CPU cycles and maybe some clever thinking as well.
 
@Robusto Peignoir seems to be from Latin pecten "comb".
 
Weird.
 
Apparently, something one wore when combing one's hair, or something.
The French etymological dictionary is a bit hard to use.
 
Hmm, ELU just told me I earned +3 rep points. Which is a very odd number.
I get that there's a downvote in there, but no accepted answers for the last epoch.
The arithmetic used here is a mystery to me.
 
6:31 PM
goddamit I was out and then I'm pulled right back in
 
You and Michael Corleone.
 
NP is the Roman form of P, and evolved during the Roman occupation of Greece, replacing the previous use of NP as the Etruscan god Satre
 
@Robusto that does seem a little ... off
 
it would correspond with 3 un-downvotes by you, or 1 un-downvote by you and 1 un-downvote on a post of yours
 
Or one vote for you and seven votes you cast against others.
 
6:35 PM
so very peculiar
 
@MattE.Эллен That's pretty good... you should see this thread...english.stackexchange.com/questions/365716/…
 
@Cerberus oh, yes, I hadn't thought of that
 
@MattE.Эллен I haven't downvoted or undownvoted for months.
 
Or or...
Or a user was deleted who had collected three down-votes by you.
 
Haha. Third time's the charm?
If I'd only known that when I was active on this site.
 
6:36 PM
or a question of yours upvoted and one downvote on you (or two downvotes by you)
 
@Mitch rofl. are you "referring the triumvirate recognition"?
 
@MattE.Эллен danged if I know.
I was using words. what more do you want?
 
it is a great favour you do us, indeed
 
@Mitch That's your mistake right there. You can point to it.
 
you can't yet type whistle language so...
 
6:40 PM
Or, as Hamlet said: "Words. Words. Words."
 
@Robusto OK game on
Here let me tell you a story
Pretty good huh?
 
@Mitch Can it be about The Beverly Hillbillies?
 
It was short but it really packs.a lot into very little
 
Hello. New here. I actually had this single-word-request question (academia.stackexchange.com/questions/177191) but I ended up posting it on Academia thinking it deals with academics and it got closed. Can someone help?
 
@Robusto haha that's someone else's story
 
6:42 PM
They already told it. You missed your chance.
 
They told it much better
also in song
 
How can you compete with that?
 
@AmalK naming things is hard, and very subjective :D What is wrong with "Program Manager"?
The best people to talk to about this are the business analysts or project managers who are specifying the work. you should have a shared vocabulary within the project, so that it can be passed on when you move on from it
 
@MattE.Эллен ikr, naming is hard! "/programmanager/" looks a bit ugly as a URL segment so was looking for something short and sweet 😅
 
maybe, but URLs aren't really for people any more, just look at Youtube video URLs. The video ids are horrendous!
that said, you could shorten it to progman
 
6:51 PM
Rhymes with "frogman" ...
I've been looking for just such a rhyme.
 
:D
Pink Floyd was prog, man
 
@MattE.Эллен " Have to agree, ugly URLs don't matter, it's just my OCD XD. Also, "progman" sounds pretty cool.
 
@MattE.Эллен Does a band ever really stop being prog?
 
@Robusto good point
@AmalK it's yours! royalty free ;)
 
@MattE.Эллен It's so good I might end up naming the app progman ;)
 
7:00 PM
lol
 
@AmalK BTW, you can thank Matt by clicking Like and Subscribe, and ring that notification bell.
 
@Robusto I wish StackExchange had these buttons. The best I can do is add them through Inspect Element and click them! ;) Thanks @MattE.Эллен!
 
no problem!
 
 
2 hours later…
8:55 PM
@Robusto That guy man. He could really talk.
 
 
3 hours later…
11:57 PM
 

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