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12:15 AM
If I write a .sh script, how do I make it a permanent command in normal usage?
It has something to do with usr/bin, right?
 
If I understand you correctly you just have to ensure it's on $PATH
 
(By the way, I've never used a .sh script before. How do you compile it?)
 
I'll go out on a limb here and say "you don't"
Can you explain your actual issue?
 
In my ~, there is a .sh file I downloaded. I would like to use this file
How do I do that?
 
Do you trust the source?
 
12:21 AM
Yes. My professor wrote it.
 
mixed signals :P
2
Make sure it's executable, then just ./name_of_script.sh if you're in ~ etc.
 
But I want to use it everywhere
 
4 mins ago, by Andras Deak
If I understand you correctly you just have to ensure it's on $PATH
either modify your $PATH or put your script somewhere that's already there
 
Ah, next question, how do you do that
 
1:20 AM
?
By the way, can I just move the .sh to usr/bin so it doesn't stay in ~?
 
 
9 hours later…
Tim
10:17 AM
happy thursday
I vaguely remember having seen some discussion on openssl
I have limited understanding of digital certificates. Was wondering if my questions here clear?
0
Q: Are the following two ways to obtain server certificates for web servers to host web applications?

Timhttps://www.digitalocean.com/community/tutorials/how-to-serve-flask-applications-with-gunicorn-and-nginx-on-ubuntu-18-04#step-6-%E2%80%94-securing-the-application says for running a flask web application with gunicorn and nginx with https: Certbot provides a variety of ways to obtain SSL cert...

@Kusalananda Thanks for explaining database migration
 
 
5 hours later…
3:40 PM
?
 
4:22 PM
@JohnnyApplesauce !
 
@Kusalananda .
 
@jesse_b ?
 
@Kusalananda !
I thought we were doing a thing
 
We were, but I don't know what thing.
@JohnnyApplesauce Better to move the script to a dedicated directory under your home directory (dedicated, that is, to your own private executables), maybe ~/bin. Then set $PATH in your shell's startup files: PATH=$HOME/bin:$PATH.
 
4:30 PM
@JohnnyApplesauce In general, do not touch /usr/bin. Your system and its package manager would get severely confused if you accidentally started moving, renaming or overwriting files there.
 
@JeffSchaller Dark magic
 
in the D&D alignment chart, it's chaotic confused
 
:-)
 
 
1 hour later…
5:38 PM
@StephenKitt Might it be worth mentioning that some things are documented in several sections and how to view the manual for a particular thing in a particular section, e.g. man 1 printf vs. man 3 printf?
 
 
1 hour later…
6:53 PM
@Kusalananda: I just came across an 803 character "one-liner"
3 line breaks and 8 pipes
 
@jesse_b One-liners, because they run quicker!
I'm trying to get my head around Ansible.
 
@Kusalananda Sounds like fun, I'm trying to learn chef
 

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