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1:08 AM
27
Q: Is the "Dutch reach" standard practice in the Netherlands?

GlorfindelThe United Kingdom is introducing a new traffic rule. According to this BBC article, A method known as the "Dutch reach" is to be introduced to the Highway Code in the UK after years of campaigning. The practice is used widely across Europe and encourages people to open vehicle doors with their ...

@Cerberus: ^ Not that you drive much, but is that a thing?
 
 
5 hours later…
5:43 AM
ParkRun finish line, it was minus 18°C but very calm. Calm weather has caused a mixture of fog and exhaust to envelop the city.
 
6:07 AM
youtube.com/watch?v=xYShiXMGULE#t=2m49s people flailing out (what does this mean?)
 
@MichaelRybkin Maybe she means the bizzare movements that people make while under the influence of some drugs?
People take drugs, and start moving their arms and legs in an odd way, and there is nobody to help them.
> Why did tensions between Russia and the West come to a head precisely in late 2021–early 2022?
Can we use the here? "in the late 2021"?
 
 
1 hour later…
7:35 AM
Former Washington State trooper Robert LaMay, who went viral when he was fired for refusing to get vaccinated and told the governor to 'kiss his ass,' has died of COVID-19
 
8:09 AM
@CowperKettle Thank you for the reply. Yes, that's probably what she means. I was not sure though. And are you asking me about the use of the article? I think you need "the" there.
 
 
2 hours later…
9:42 AM
@Shafizadeh Share the post with anyone who you think is suited for the position.
Possibly substitute "anyone" with "whoever".
Not sure about the "who", but I'm very sketchy on English grammar, sorry.
 
 
3 hours later…
12:17 PM
What are valid hyphenations of “children”? My Longman dictionary, which usually gives hyphenations, doesn't tell, because “children” doesn't have its own headword, it's only listed in the entry of “child”.
I'm asking because this book hyphenates it as “chil-dren”, which seems wrong, but English hyphenation is so random that I can't tell if that's normal or not.
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/children says “child-ren”, but some other online sources say “chil-dren”, and I have no idea what hyphenation dictionary I should trust where the Longman on my shelf fails.
 
 
1 hour later…
2:25 PM
@Mitch True.
@b_jonas I'd use child as the headword. But I doubt anyone would notice either way. With the avalanche of misspellings, malapropisms, and in-group vocabulary, one minuscule difference of opinion in hyphenation is not likely to label you an ignoramus.
 
 
1 hour later…
3:56 PM
@Robusto I have heard of its being taught in driving-lessions, but I'm not sure how common it is.
It might be sensible.
I believe the idea is that you're forced to turn your upper body this way, which allows you to look over your shoulder more easily / automatically.
 
4:26 PM
@Cerberus Yes, that's the idea. And as a cyclist I would wholly endorse that. I've been "doored" before. But I still wouldn't rely on that. These days I always pay very close attention to the circumstances of riding in traffic.
 
4:55 PM
@Mitch You're not supposed to be a cynic. In no story are oxen portrayed as cynical
 
 
4 hours later…
9:08 PM
@Robusto That is indeed the idea.
But, as you, say, you always need to pay attention as a cyclist.
In modern streets, cars cannot park next to cycle paths.
But we're not there yet!
 
@M.A.R. that bull in that story about not wanting to go into the bullring... nope he was oblivious. How about... I can't think of any other stories about bulls.
Now I'm concerned about underrepresentation. Not enough bull stories. Even minor characters
There was a Bugs Bunny episode
And,..
Nope that's it. That's all the bulls
Are you saying I must keep to my label? Like I should be bovine? Or @Cerberus should be the cynic? Or Reg should be ...owline?
Uhuline?
 
9:46 PM
@Mitch I shamed Lawler into adding an actual answer, which I accepted.
His answer is better than the ones for the other questions as well.
@Mitch And I am dreamly. 夢的 (yumeteki).
 
10:13 PM
Oops, I meant dreamy. D'oh!
 

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