« first day (3866 days earlier)      last day (44 days later) » 

12:11 AM
Oh, is that it.
Good to know!
 
12:29 AM
@Cerberus No, I'm serious. I've interviewed many, many programmers in my time. You talk with someone, give them a coding problem and ask them how they'd approach it, show them some function or method and ask them what it will return (and do the same with some code that has an error and ask them what's wrong with it), things like that.
You can pretty quickly assess someone's competence.
That doesn't tell you what they're like on the job, however. Some people can't produce under pressure, and it's pretty much all about pressure.
 
12:45 AM
@Robusto Sure, that makes sense.
@Robusto Why is it all about pressure?
 
@Cerberus Because there are always deadlines.
Some places are worse than others, but if someone hires you for a job they want to be sure you can solve problems and get the job done on time.
 
@Robusto Hmm but have those deadlines been drawn correctly, then, if they cause so much pressure?
I mean, it would not seem optimal.
Deadlines do not always give one the most reliable results.
 
Planning has guesswork as one of its components.
There are always things you don't know that you don't know.
And, as we find over and over again, nature always sides with the hidden flaw.
That's not to say that in a well-run shop it's all guesswork. Most of the time, with competent people, you are able to guess pretty accurately how long something will take.
 
> In the mouth of the whale: lobster diver swallowed by humpback lives to tell the tale
The Cape Cod fisherman estimates he was in the beast’s mouth for 30 seconds; experts say the encounter was a fluke
 
But then you will also find the vice president will overrule your team lead and say,"No, we need it by the beginning of Q2."
@tchrist Har har har.
A friend of mine and his wife are good examples. Both are programmers. He's brilliant, but obsessive. He'll focus on a single problem and solve it perfectly, brilliantly. But that takes time, and he frequently gets way behind in his work. His wife is a MacGyver: she triages, patches here and there, pulls in tools that help her get done, and she makes her deadlines always. She finds what will suffice and moves on.
 
12:58 AM
@Cerberus The problem is that business plans run on schedules, and you set those schedules only after you've "planned everything". This never, ever works. That's because during the planning phase you see the matter as from a great distance, bereft of fine detail and unknown entanglements. Only once you have actually prototyped out the rough draft of a WORKING solution can you begin to estimate how long it will take to productize it. But this is always far too late.
So there is always incredible pressure to do what you said you would do before you knew diddlyfookingsquat about what "doing it" would actually require.
 
@Robusto Right, so less pressure in a well run shop?
 
@Cerberus Yes. Pressure is worse in a poorly run shop.
 
@tchrist Then either don't make such promises early, or promise twice the time you think you will need?
 
Thrice.
The rule of thumb is thrice.
 
Of course I make the same mistake for my own work.
Right, thrice or force.
 
1:01 AM
Under-promise and over-deliver. That's the way of the world.
 
But I'd feel very bad about myself if I made the promise on behalf of others and forced them to work under pressure.
 
You don't. You get them to agree that they'll do what they don't yet know how to do in that amount of time.
That's the problem.
Or you have them tell you how long. It always takes thrice as long as that even when you take this rule into account.
It's a bit like how projections, like progress reports, always become rosier each level up the reporting chain you go. Do that a few times and there's nothing left of reality to those.
Of course this can be much worse at "old style" companies than at those following more modern management practices and expectations.
A good example of this which you'll be able to immediately understand is the practice of creating a formal Incident Report every time something goes haywire that affects your company's customers in a disruptive way.
Companies that can produce those WITHOUT penalizing whoever messed up can learn from their mistakes and not repeat them. But those who penalize the people who messed up create a negative atmosphere so that people won't come forward and there's no good analysis to learn from, and the problems recur and exacerbate.
These are complex situations, and many parties are involved. You have to be brutally honest about exactly what happened when, who did what and who noticed what, and what was done to fix it.
There's a timeline portion of the Incident, then various insights and actions to take to prevent a recurrence.
 
Most of the places I've worked have adopted the Agile methodology, which includes planning estimation. Only one ever did it right, and that's the company that got bought out by a megacorp.
 
Yes, it's "the" thing.
 
1:17 AM
When it's done poorly it's an abomination.
 
@Cerberus In Russia, it's "if everyone jumped from a roof"
 
@CowperKettle Yeah, it could be a roof as well in Dutch.
 
@CowperKettle In America it's "jumped into the lake."
Our air is back in the "good" range. The smoke from the Arizona fires has moved off to the east.
 
1:35 AM
Good!
I have also heard "jump off a cliff" in English.
 
Yes, that too.
 
2:16 AM
> After spending the next eleven years in Alexandria, he then decided, at the age of around 38, to investigate the philosophical teachings of the Persian philosophers and the Indian philosophers.[8] In the pursuit of this endeavor he left Alexandria and joined the army of Gordian III as it marched on Persia.
Invading Persia to investigate its philosophy.
Was J.Bush trying to investigate Iraqi philosophy?
 
Doubts.
Just listen to all these different Irish accents!
2
They subtitle most of them, but for the 19-year-old.
 
 
4 hours later…
5:50 AM
Ronda, Andalusia
 
6:13 AM
 
6:32 AM
I've had it with names today
Oof
The teachers are hellbent on decimating us.
* obliterating us, for the touchy Romans
Be deprived of two nights' sleep and watch traumatizing pics enough for a lifetime, and then it doesn't pay off because the exam is so unreasonable everyone is thoroughly steamrolled.
How was your day?
 
@M.A.R. Fine, thank you!
 
 
1 hour later…
8:09 AM
Thousand cases/day more, going up thus far
My mom's second shot is on Tuesday
Dad still refuses to get vaccinated
 
8:45 AM
 
8:58 AM
LOL
From a pro-Trump twitter
 
9:34 AM
> Dogor is a 18,000 years old preserved canine specimen that was found in the Siberian permafrost in 2018.
 
 
2 hours later…
12:01 PM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Link at beginning of answer (34): Do Britons say 'major' for 'main area of study' at university? by Anna Zeal on english.SE
 
12:14 PM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Offensive body detected, toxic body detected (101): Meaning of "got the hookup" by my name depends on you on english.SE
 
12:26 PM
@CowperKettle If I wiggle the Handel will it wiggle Bach?
@Færd They're both damn near perfect, but I have a fondness for the Etta James just because it's the one I've known since high school. To me it just sounds more like it's pulled from the heart.
 
12:55 PM
@CowperKettle Ah, I missed him, was wondering where he went.
 
1:10 PM
@CowperKettle This should surprise no one.
@CowperKettle I knew aglet, tines, phosphenes, box tent, minimus, vocables, interrobang, and tittle.
 
 
1 hour later…
2:21 PM
1) I found the kid harder to understand than the older ones.
2) I -still- don't get it. I mean I can reconstruct what all the issues are there but none of it makes sense. And I can never ever tell who is on which side.
 
2:38 PM
@Cerberus I grew up with 'jump off a bridge'
But also 'stick your head in an oven'.
 
@Mitch Another good one.
 
Which, I've come to find out later, is a method supposedly for killing oneself. And as a child (and as an adult) I've never understood because 1) it smells, 2) it would take to long, 3) is just plain uncomfortable sitting on the floor trying to figure out how long to put yourself in there only to fall out from unconsciousness not finishing the job.
 
Agreed.
 
And realizing it needs to be cleaned.
 
It is better when Hansen and Gretl do it to you.
 
2:42 PM
who wants to die like that?
 
Then they can clean the oven.
 
Also, if all your friends are doing it wouldn't it get crowded?
seems like a weird thing to do.
 
You'd need to go to Auschwitz.
 
So no, mom, if all my friends put their heads in an oven I would not do it too. I'm not some weirdo.
But jumping off a bridge sounds like a lot of fun. I'd totally do that. I mean, if there's enough water below and well you gotta wait for the person in front of you to swim out of the way.
YOu don't want to bonk heads.
Very very painful.
Very
oh my god
painful
@Cerberus Oh yeah. That's not a good association.
I mean as a kid it would never have occurred to me.
 
When you said the oven would be too small.
 
2:46 PM
@Cerberus The slow but hiding cleverness younger idiot brother who sleeps -on- the stove. I mean that's pretty weird too. But at least it's not crazy trying to sleep inside.
@Cerberus Toaster oven
can barely toast toast. and it takes forever.
maybe that means we just don't have a good toaster oven.
starts todo list
1. get new toaster oven
2. consider not bothering
2. consider not bothering
1. get new toaster oven
Todo list completed!!!
My day is done!!!
Off with my friends! They said something about a bridge.
 
Moscow has announced a tightening of anti-covid measures, with businesses asked to switch all workers to distance work where possible, or to institute a holiday period until June 20.
The curve is really steep there.
 
 
1 hour later…
3:59 PM
Aug 3 '20 at 20:50, by Robusto
All of my to-do lists have only one item: make list.
 
4:14 PM
Word (sense) of the day: proprioception
> Proprioception includes the sense of movement and position of our limbs and muscles. For example, proprioception enables a person to touch their finger to the tip of their nose, even with their eyes closed. It enables a person to climb steps without looking at each one. People with poor proprioception may be clumsy and uncoordinated.
 
4:28 PM
Opinion: Russia’s FSB poisoned another Putin critic. It’s chilling. - Washington Post about the poisoning of poet Bykov
 
@Robusto That can't be -that- strong a sense.
 
@Mitch Not if you fall down stairs a lot.
 
or rather, it is a derived sense.
or
@Robusto THere's no guarantee that proprioception is the measure of things that allows walking down stairs.
even blindfolded
 
Hey, your beef isn't with me. It's with whoever made up that term.
 
I'm writing a letter right now.
 
4:32 PM
I don't blame you.
> Proprioception is mediated by proprioceptors, mechanosensory neurons located within muscles, tendons, and joints.[3] There are multiple types of proprioceptors which are activated during distinct behaviors and encode distinct types of information: limb velocity and movement, load on a limb, and limb limits. Vertebrates and invertebrates have distinct but similar modes of encoding this information.
 
@Robusto If I were building an artificial animal , and I'm not saying I am, but if I were, I feel like I could get.a long way to knowing self state without proprioceptors in the movement mechanism, that it could be done by a combination of knowing what signals to move are, and self-vision, and algorithms to coordinate. OK what the hell throw some balance in there too.
IN other words, I'm surprised that evolution created very particular "mechanosensory neurons located within muscles, tendons, and joints"
on the other hand, vision is also hard, so if I were building an extremely lo-tech robot without vision, then proprioceptors would be very useful.
like in an assembly line, little sensors that say that a bin is full or that an arm has swung far enough and should be reset.
 
You're making me sorry I brought it up. I just thought it was an interesting word.
 
@Robusto based entirely on a whim, I will drive this sucker hard into the ground
@tchrist what are winegums?
 
@Mitch a fruit-flavoured sweetmeat made with gelatine
> a1953 D. Thomas Under Milk Wood (1954) 60 Brandyballs, winegums, hundreds and thousands, liquorice sweet as sick.

1981 Times 1 May 19/3 Energy is stored in plastic pellets, like wine gums.
Next you're going to tell me you never realized that Brandy was masculine.
Wine gums (or winegums) are chewy, firm pastille-type sweets similar to gumdrops without the sugar coating, originating from the United Kingdom. All brands have their own recipes containing various sweeteners, flavourings, and colourings. Wine gums are popular in the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Ireland, South Africa and many Commonwealth nations, as well as several European countries. Common brands include Maynards, Bassett's and Lion. The gums usually come in five shapes: kidney, crown, rhombus, circle and oblong, and are usually labelled with the name of a wine: for example, Maynards use...
 
5:10 PM
> Despite the name, they usually contain no alcohol.
 
Otherwise old winegums would become vinega.
 
> Kongen af Danmark ('King of Denmark') are Danish candies containing Anise, sugar and beetroot juice, originally invented to persuade the king of Denmark to take the medicine he had been prescribed, as he didn't like the strong flavour of the anise.
 
ass-tasting candies
 
Elixir Pectoralе Regis Daniae
 
What are those, tit-tasting candies? :)
 
5:21 PM
> Between July 26 to August 22, 2020, the average number of visits associated with suspected suicide attempts in girls of this age was 26 percent higher than the same period in 2019. medicalxpress.com/news/2021-06-teen-girls-suicide-pandemic.html
Lockdown and suicide
> During February 21 to March 20, 2021, it had shot up an alarming 51 percent compared to the same period in 2020. For boys of the same age, the rise in emergency room visits was four percent.
Because boys are less doctor-going, probably
 
5:38 PM
@Robusto I agree. We don't go back so long, me and James, but hers sounds more original to me too.
 
5:53 PM
I should watch the movie
 
"Liebestod" ([ˈliːbəsˌtoːt] German for "love death") is the title of the final, dramatic music from the 1859 opera Tristan und Isolde by Richard Wagner. It is the climactic end of the opera, as Isolde sings over Tristan's dead body. The music is often used in film and television productions of doomed lovers. == Partial text == == References == == Further reading == Bronfen, Elisabeth, Liebestod und Femme fatale. Der Austausch sozialer Energien zwischen Oper, Literatur und Film, Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp 2004. ISBN 3-518-12229-0 == External links == "Isolde's Liebestod", act 3, sco...
 
Wow, the 2021 drought is exceptional
 
It is.
I reside within the only undroughted area of Colorado in the 2021 map.
That won't save me from the fallout of wildfire smoke to my west, though.
 
We'll be having a rainy week
 
The image is from this New York Times article.
 
6:06 PM
 
Oops time to go incognito. Or use a different browser.
Oh is that really a $0.50 per week rate that's guaranteed for a full year? That's not a bad deal.
I'm in that little tiny "record wettest" corner in the east part.
Everything else is record driest.
Or nearly so.
It's lush and green here, greener than I've ever seen it in the three decades I've lived here.
I cannot imagine what fires may come. Last year's scenes from the Far West were apocalyptic.
 
As a child, my parents took me holidaying to Mahinjauri, which turned out to be the wettest place in the Soviet Union.
It's in Georgia, right on the border with Turkey
There were rains every day.
> Owing to its subtropical climate and sulphur springs, the then-village Makhinjauri was developed into a resort under the Imperial Russian rule around 1904.
The thing I liked the most about Georgia was Khachapuri
Khachapuri (Georgian: ხაჭაპური khach’ap’uri [xɑtʃʼɑpʼuri] (listen) from Georgian: ხაჭო Georgian pronunciation: [xatʃ'o] "curds" + Georgian: პური Georgian pronunciation: [p'uri] "bread") is a traditional Georgian dish of cheese-filled bread. The bread is leavened and allowed to rise and is shaped in various ways, usually with cheese in the middle and a crust which is ripped off and used to dip in the cheese. The filling contains cheese (fresh or aged, most commonly, specialized Khachapuri cheese), eggs and other ingredients.It is very popular in Georgia, both in restaurants and as street food. As...
It was amazingly tasty. I've never tasted a similar khachapury after that.
Probably because they put a lot of local spices there
It was filled with liquid cheese, very hot.
Oh. "Puri" means bread in Georgian and in Hindi
> The name puri derives from the Sanskrit word पूरिका (pūrikā), from पुर (pura) "filled".[1] It has a similar name in many Asian languages including:Tamil: பூரி (pūri) ,Telugu: పూరి (pūri), Gujarati: પૂરી, Assamese: পুৰি (puri), Bengali: পুরি (Purī), Hindi: पूड़ी (pūḍī), Marathi: पूरी (pūrī), Kannada: ಪೂರಿ (pūri), Malayalam: പൂരി, Burmese: ပူရီ (pūrī), Nepali: पूरी (puri), Odia: ପୁରି (puri), Punjabi: ਪੁੜੀ (pūḍī), Urdu: پوری‎ (puri).[2]
Local Georgians who leased houses to tourists seemed to be spending days drinking wine and chacha, a strong pomace brandy.
I remember they went to get some more chacha now and then.
Chacha (Georgian: ჭაჭა ch’ach’a [tʃʼɑtʃʼɑ]) is a Georgian pomace brandy, a clear and strong (ranging between 40% alcohol for commercially produced to 65% for home brew), which is sometimes called "Wine vodka", "grape vodka", or "Georgian vodka/grappa". It is made of grape pomace (grape residue left after making wine). The term chacha is used in Georgia to refer to grape distillate. It may be also produced from unripe or wild grapes. Other common fruits or herbs used are figs, tangerines, oranges, mulberries or tarragon. Traditionally only a homebrewed drink of Georgians, it is today commonly produced...
> But "a toast!" is the phrase dreaded by any visitor with a busy work day ahead. Out comes a bottle of Chacha, the lethal Georgian schnapps, or a large plastic bottle of homemade wine. Both must be downed in large shots. Excuses that you have to drive back six hours along twisting mountain roads won't be accepted.
 
6:33 PM
@CowperKettle that is some of the weirdest cognitive dissonance anchoring reverse psychology I've heard
 
7:23 PM
@CowperKettle this sounds like Putin is trolling people and they're feeding him.
@CowperKettle Lol
 
7:42 PM
I don't know how this showed up in my feed, but it's kind of fascinating. Especially listening to the Hadza click language.
Also, these people are all about wake-and-bake. Who knew?
 

« first day (3866 days earlier)      last day (44 days later) »