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1:21 AM
Age of criminal responsibility
Piggly Wiggly is an American supermarket chain operating in the Southern and Midwestern regions of the United States, run by Piggly Wiggly, LLC, an affiliate of C&S Wholesale Grocers. Its first outlet opened in 1916 in Memphis, Tennessee, and is notable for having been the first true self-service grocery store, and the originator of various familiar supermarket features such as checkout stands, individual item price marking and shopping carts. The current company headquarters is in Keene, New Hampshire. There are a total of 499 independently owned Piggly Wiggly stores operate across 18 states,...
Such stores first appeared in Russia in the 1990s
A man and his son were at the zoo where the man worked as a zoologist. The boy asked his father “Dad, why is that animal with the horns being so mean to the others?” The man said “Well son, there’s good gnus and bad gnus.”
 
 
3 hours later…
4:33 AM
> I never thought that I would enter the bank in a face mask and rubber gloves and the guard will say "good morning!".
 
 
2 hours later…
6:29 AM
It just kills me that I must reboot my laptop just to get it to start switching from inbuilt loudspeakers to the headphone jack. Is there absolutely no way to manually switch between the two?
After a reboot, the automatic switch to headphones works for some time, but then mysteriously it stops working, and all sounds go through the loudspeakers
 
 
3 hours later…
9:40 AM
purely talking with a psychologist isn't useful, I think.
she should be able to address your issue to discuss about the solution.
mental distress on different individuals are caused by different issues.
a psychologist should have a wide scope of experience to help solve the issues of different fields.
this is like English teacher for PhD students.
she asks us to improve a experimental data plot.
but I haven't done an experiment for long.
 
11:01 AM
@Bohemianrelativist Are you preparing data schemes for some psychological experiments?
 
 
2 hours later…
nice. more difficult to spot the weird bits than with "this person does not exist"
 
1:10 PM
So sleepy. I couldn't sleep last night though I tried to go to bed early, like after 11 before 12 o'clock, but I kept not being able to fall asleep.
so I am going to sleep for a while.
 
1:23 PM
do you have a way of wiping off sleepiness besides going to sleep?
 
> there are roughly half a million homeless people in the United States on any given night, in a country that is estimated to have roughly 18 million empty homes in it
 
1:48 PM
I want another Facebook with only my news feeds without friends.
 
 
2 hours later…
4:19 PM
Sir Hugh Willoughby (died 1554) was an English soldier and an early Arctic voyager. He served in the court of Henry VIII and fought in the Scottish campaign where he was knighted for his valour. In 1553 he was selected by a company of London merchants to lead a fleet of three vessels in search of a northeast route to the Far East. Willoughby and the crews of two ships died on the voyage while the third vessel Edward Bonaventure, under the command of Richard Chancellor, went on both to open a successful, long-lasting trading arrangement with Russia. == Biography == Willoughby was the third...
Curious. Arctic explorer, a tragic death close to civilization.
A lot of people even today die from monoxide poisoning, in tents while camping in winter.
 
4:59 PM
I don't recall such temperature on 15 April, ever
I recall that back in 2015 such temperature was rarely seen the whole summer.
 
5:25 PM
Impressive.
So nots or something is night, utro morning (I remember this one and the next from when I visited Russia), dyen is day, vetser evening. That all makes sense, very Indo-European.
 
6:18 PM
@CowperKettle: More questions from my desultory Travels in Siberia. 1. Do Russians disdain seatbelts in vehicles, and think them an American absurdity? 2. Is tick-borne encephalitis a problem where you are? 3. Where do you put stress in patronymics? Is it regular or case-by-case? (E.g., where do you stress Fyodorovna?)
 
6:29 PM
@CowperKettle I don't agree with that map. There is nowhere in the US where an infant or a toddler is going to be considered culpable for a crime and liable for prosecution. Very occasionally a pre-teen will be if it is a particularly heinous act (like the murder of a child), but those most often wind up as mental cases. That said, it is not unheard of for children of color to be treated differently from white children, which is a problem in itself.
 
We hear of 5-y-o children in American being handcuffed by the police.
 
@Cerberus The European conception of American children might allow for that
But to @Robusto's point, it's probably doesn't happen to white children.
 
@Mitch It has nothing to do with that, this is from American media.
I think maybe children tend to be handled too softly by some people these days, but handcuffing by the police would not seem appropriate, no matter how annoying the child is.
The police should just not be involved in dealing with children at all, except perhaps when there are weapons involved.
 
7:06 PM
@Cerberus You're just jealous that Americans invented McDonald's.
 
I...don't know what to say.
 
You should say "I'll have a Whopper...with extra cheese!"
What are the featured special burger choices coming out this summer where you are?
You know, like in France there's a Beurre Gueurre Béarnaise or in Spain a Paella del Rey Burger
In India a Curried Pounder with Paneer
The dutch version would be a burger. that's it. Plain, no cheese, no lettuce tomato onion
no sauce
no bun
Almost as bad as the English version
where the burger has mad cow disease
The scottish version, the same but deep fried
The norwegian version, the same as the scottish version but instead of hamburger it's rotten fish
The russian version? Six shots of kerosene.
I take it from your reticence that you are in awe of how good America looks in comparison.
 
I know nothing about American fastfood.
When I eat a hamburger, I buy it at the butcher's.
Or possibly at a local snack bar.
I remember occasionally buying a hamburger at Buger King at the train station when I came home from university in a different city after 10 PM and I had to wait for the train.
Also because it's extremely cheap, €1 or so.
And there was nothing else at the station.
 
7:32 PM
Hamburger University is a training facility at the McDonald's Corporation global headquarters in Chicago, Illinois. It instructs high-potential restaurant managers, mid-managers and owner-operators in restaurant management.More than 5,000 students attend Hamburger University each year and over 275,000 people have graduated with a degree in Hamburgerology. == History == Hamburger University training started in 1961 with a class of 14 people in the basement of one of its restaurants.In 2018, both the McDonald's headquarters and Hamburger University moved to West Loop, Chicago, in a new complex built...
> Hamburger University

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Not to be confused with University of Hamburg.
 
7:54 PM
I wonder who was the first author to describe the contrast between analog and digital (clocks, signals, computers, maybe something else).
They must have had to explain just what they meant by "analog" and "digital," or else nobody would have understood what they were saying.
The thing that prompts the question is that the other day, I was thinking about whether an abacus is an analog computing device or a digital computing device.
Each row represents one digit, so that seems to make it digital.
On the other hand, within each row, a digit is represented almost directly as a number of beads, which sounds more analog to me.
 
8:11 PM
I don't really see how that sounds analogue?
If it counts in discrete steps, that should make it digital.
Analogue ~= continuous
 
Well, suppose that you're counting sheep by dropping a stone into a bucket every time a sheep goes by, so that when you're done counting, the number of stones in the bucket equals the number of sheep.
I feel like that may qualify as analog rather than digital.
 
That sounds totally discrete
and analog works on continuous scales
so
measuring with pebbles would be
calculogue
 
@TerranSwett Why? That sounds very digital to me.
 
counting sheep would be
somnilofog
 
@Cerberus Is there anything you'd describe as analog but discrete, or digital but continuous?
 
8:15 PM
Uhh no!
I'd say those are mutually exclusive by definition.
 
or if you are counting memes it'd be
dogue
or
 
Analogue doesn't mean "old fashioned".
 
if
@Cerberus well
 
I feel like "analog" ought to mean something other than "continuous."
 
it is a bit old fashioned
 
8:16 PM
It means continuous but only much more specific.
 
@TerranSwett what more do you want from it?
 
Continuous with respect to measuring or similar.
 
If I take a digital clock and modify it so that the rightmost digit is a drum which rotates continuously, I don't think I've made it into an analog clock.
 
Counting with your fingers is the archetype of digital.
 
It's still a digital clock, albeit one that moves continuously.
 
8:18 PM
@TerranSwett I find your drum a bit hard to imagine, but I think you would have turned an important part of your device into something analogue.
 
And if I have an analog clock whose second hand can only be in one of 60 positions, it's still an analog clock.
 
I would say you've made it partly digital thereby.
 
I do agree that the continuously rotating drum would be kind of analog.
Plus, you know those old power meters (maybe they still make them) with several dials, geared so that each one moves at 1/10 the speed of the one to the right, but they all move continuously?
 
A device can be a combination of differently characterised elements.
 
I feel like those can only be described as both digital and analog.
They're obviously analog, and yet they obviously have digits too.
 
8:22 PM
I don't know them, but why digital?
Digital isn't about having digits per se.
Anything quantitative has digits.
 
I think "digital" means almost exactly "having digits."
And each dial represents one digit.
 
Nooo.
A clock on a church has digits.
 
Well, true.
 
nods nods nods
 
In any case, I've gotta get back at it.
Talk to y'all later.
 
8:26 PM
Adios!
Interesting topics as always.
 
and if your clock is made out of trees it is
logue
 
Hah.
 
and if it is made in a swamp it is
peatbogue
and if it talks a lot it is a
dialogue
if it talks alot and is racist it is a
demagogue
if it is Dutch it is a
woodenclogue
if it is a public diary it is a
weblogue
ok one more
if it has tusks it is a
warthogue
there
I'm done
for the moment
 
@CowperKettle Kinda a random chart huh
 
8:49 PM
@Cerberus That is not the same as being legally culpable. And that particular incident was such an outrageous case (a callous mistake by the police) that it made the news all over. It is certainly not something that goes on all the time.
You make it sound as if this sort of thing goes on all the time. It doesn't.
Again, the tragedy is that it happens at all, and to children of color much more often than to white children. It shouldn't happen to any children, ever.
@Mitch I might think Germany's neighbors to the west could argue with that. France is certainly no slouch in the bread department. Nor is Russia, from what I hear.
makes joke involving French bread and pain
That was a do-it-yourself joke. I gave you the material, now you have to fashion a joke out of it, preferably a funny one.
 
9:29 PM
@Robusto French bread is overrated
 
You call that a joke? Pfft.
 
German bread is vastly underrated, or rather not even recognized
 
Again, not a joke.
 
I actually laughed.
Worst tween ever.
 
9:32 PM
@Robusto French bread is pretty serious. It's just not as...OK, in comparison, American bread is awful. So I get why people fall over themselves for French bread which is simply OK in the bigger scheme
 
@RegDwigнt Yeah. I've had to make some pretty quick switches between flute and piccolo in my day, but that's definitely worse.
He might have just farted for all we know.
 
@Robusto look man I don't even read my own stuff
 
@Mitch I am something of a connoisseur of bread, so trust me when I say I really like the bread I've had in France. Germany too, but I'm just making the point that this is still an argument about which is better. The matter is not decided.
 
@Robusto No it's pretty much decided that you're wrong
 
makes face, sticks out tongue
 
9:36 PM
OK now you've done it
😜
mf
What is with picture fonts?
They are way way way too small
all that looks like is a yellow splosh with... are those eyes?
 
Robusto's Rule of Argumentation: The first person who uses an emoji in an argument is the loser.
 
you don't have the guts to use emojis
 
No, I don't have the emojis to use emojis.
 
that would do it
It's as easy to use Cherokee as it is to use emojis
It's as easy to use italic Kanji fonts as it is to use emojis
 
@Robusto Yes, of course.
 
9:41 PM
It's as easy to record donce in choreographic notation
 
It was just an illustration.
I posted two incidents, by the way, and on the first Google page there were plenty of others.
 
It's the rule of law here in the US
anything goes in Europe it seems
 
The issue with the police being involved in dealing with (unarmed) children called in by schools does exist in America, though.
 
I think the police are in charge of the body scanners checking for arms as students enter schools.
it's just community safety
 
@Mitch What gets me is when New Hampshire thinks they're better than Massachusetts because they didn't burn witches up there. Hell, many of the New Hampshire witches weren't even charged, much less burned. Besides, if it came to a fight, Massachusetts would win.
 
9:46 PM
Mass witches would totally burn the shit out of New Hampshire ones.
NH has nothing to brag about
in Harry Potter, the women were called witches and the men wizards, right? Or were they all wizards?
nope google says F=witch, M=wizard
why did she never use warlock?
much cooler name
 
I think the corresponding male term is warlock.
 
@Mitch Body scanners, in schools?
 
Oops, jinx.
 
@Cerberus uh yeah uh metal detectors for like guns and knives
 
Wow.
 
9:53 PM
not the airport things. that would be extreme
 
@Cerberus When you have mass shootings in schools, as we do, it's not such a strange precaution.
 
@Cerberus And like with all generalizations, that means like a handful of schools have installed metal detectors. most do not have them. but yes, some very small number do and that's bad enough
 
@Mitch I think they're standard issue in inner city schools.
 
@Robusto which reminds me... once the pandemic comes under control, more people will be whooping it up like a party, we'll go back to normal, and back to the usual schedule of school shootings
 
@Robusto I suppose not.
How terrible.
 
9:55 PM
I guess it beats growing up in Syria
 
@Mitch Yes. It's a lamentable situation.
 
Are school shootings more frequent in cities?
 
@Cerberus hm...
what I have heard about school shootings is that, while there are much more in the US than anywhere, there are still not enough to draw definitive conclusions. Only general possible patterns that could be due to chance.
that's what I've heard
I think there are some patterns that are incontrovertible, like they'e almost entirely done by young white males, with only a handful of exceptions (that old dude in Las Vegas)
 
OK interesting.
 
10:25 PM
wait... is the flu that runs around every year nowadays a multigenerational descendant of the 1918 flu?
 
I'm sure flu strains are terribly complex.
I'm sure we have many different strains each year.
 
11:10 PM
Andrew Sullivan seems to be an interesting person
 
@Mitch > The 1918 Spanish flu was the first of three flu pandemics caused by H1N1 influenza A virus; the most recent one was the 2009 swine flu pandemic.[13] The 1977 Russian flu was also caused by H1N1 virus, but it mostly affected young population.[14][15]
 
11:24 PM
But you knew that, didn’t you.
 
11:36 PM
@M.A.R. For a neocon.
 
11:48 PM
@Xanne of course not! I can't keep track of H#N# and which goes with which. But not every year is there a 'named' flu (named after an animal or something). Are all the flus related whether named or not? and are they all multiple mutations down the road from the 1918 flu?
@Cerberus I want oversimplified answers
with nuance
 

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