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2:50 AM
The plague of Justinian or Justinianic plague (541–549 AD) was the first major outbreak of the first plague pandemic, the first Old World pandemic of plague, the contagious disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis. The disease afflicted the entire Mediterranean Basin, Europe, and the Near East, severely affecting the Sasanian Empire and the Byzantine Empire and especially its capital, Constantinople. The plague is named for the Byzantine emperor in Constantinople, Justinian I (r. 527–565) who, according to his court historian Procopius, contracted the disease and recovered in 542, at the...
This one supposedly prevented the restoration of the Roman Empire
10 years after the onset of the plague.
After some more years, it all crept back
 
3:03 AM
> Germans like to predict what will happen in the coming year, and they have an interesting way to do that: lead pouring. Or, to be more accurate, “tin pouring,” since the dangers of lead poisoning are well known. But it was not until 2018 that German and EU law actually banned the sale of lead-pouring kits (Bleigieß-Sets)
Bleigießen
 
 
3 hours later…
6:21 AM
@CowperKettle We do that too!
We used solder.
 
6:37 AM
@Cerberus I first heard about this an hour ago in an audiobook about 1914
 
 
5 hours later…
11:41 AM
 
 
1 hour later…
12:43 PM
That’s sort of ugly. What is it?
 
 
1 hour later…
1:49 PM
@Xanne It's a young version of those things in that movie. They're born in summer off world inside an earthen dam around a lake of water (where the sand people save it all up). In other words it is a...
firm berm worm born in Dune moon June
 
2:45 PM
Relative instances of malware worldwide, according to ESET. ^
I guess the gray areas don't have a lot of computers?
 
This November, 91% of new cars sold in Norway were electric cars.
 
3:20 PM
> Anthony Broadwater served 16 years in prison for the crime before he was exonerated in 2021 after a judge found serious issues with the initial conviction.
Lucky is a 1999 memoir by the American novelist Alice Sebold, best known as the author of the 2002 novel The Lovely Bones. Lucky describes her experience of being raped and beaten by a black man when she was eighteen in a tunnel near Syracuse University where she was a student, and how this traumatic experience shaped the rest of her life, before she apparently discovered the identity of her rapist and had him arrested. Sebold has stated that her reason for writing the book was to bring more awareness to rape and rape survivors. The memoir sold over one million copies.Anthony Broadwater served...
> When Timothy Mucciante began working as executive producer on the project, he noticed discrepancies in the portion of Lucky that described the trial. He later told The New York Times, "I started having some doubts—not about the story that Alice told about her assault, which was tragic, but the second part of her book about the trial, which didn’t hang together".
I can imagine how many innocent people are behind bars right now.
 
3:34 PM
@Robusto How many computers do you think there are in Iran or Ethiopia or Venezuela?
 
There is at least one in Iran, owned by @M.A.R.
 
See?
There are millions in each of the countries mentioned.
 
3:54 PM
Hmm Portugal is low.
And Finland as well.
I wonder how representative this survey was.
 
@Cerberus I wouldn't figure that the Scandinavian countries would have much realistic probability of it actually happening.
Also... 'allow'? This is the 21st century... what parents have that kind of intrusive agency over their adult chidren?
 
Well, there are few black people in Europe, maybe a few per cent? But still enough to meet when you live in various cities.
 
But this is just taking words too literally
 
@Mitch I wonder whether the question was phrased exactly as such.
 
@Cerberus No idea, but I would guess not as many as in Europe or China or the US.
 
3:59 PM
@Cerberus It looks like the question is verbatim
 
@Robusto Not as many, but still many millions.
@Mitch Yes, but is it really?
It's a picture from the Internet.
Who knows?
 
@Cerberus 3% African descent in the UK I think, probably more in France
@Cerberus granted.
 
Well, most people of (northern) African descent are not black.
 
@CowperKettle That is a question only for people who have never had children. After a certain age, the question of allowing your children is moot.
Ah, I see Mitch has already given that answer.
 
I am flabbergasted at how many people in Turkey said yes, though.
Could be a 'desirable' answer.
 
4:01 PM
@Cerberus sorry...subsaharan African
 
But that should also apply to other countries.
 
@Cerberus As I suspect it is in Iceland
 
@Mitch I think it's around 3% here as well.
@Mitch But then it should be the same everywhere.
And yet the differences are huge.
 
And 'black' may mean North African or MIddle Eastern in some countries/languages
 
Naaah.
If so, then the question was very poorly translated.
 
4:05 PM
@Cerberus Well, that certainly points out that not everything is in that picture, namely all the translations to all those other languages.
 
Yes.
 
@Cerberus But may not, say, 'negro' in Italian or Spanish be broader and include North Africans?
 
@Mitch In some places it means non-white, period.
 
@Robusto Yeah, that's what I'm wondering exactly for which countries/languages that might be the case
 
@Mitch I should think not. Again, if it did, then that would be a very poor translation.
 
4:07 PM
The British apparently referred to all of India, including what is now Pakistan, as the less polite term for "Negros."
 
@Cerberus So you disagree with Robusto?
 
@Robusto Hmm kind of odd, but it also makes sense.
@Mitch I don't know.
 
or are you saying they should use more nuanced translations of black other than the literal one?
 
Would I ever dare to?
 
@Cerberus Dare.
Well
 
4:09 PM
@Mitch What I am saying is that a reasonable translation holds the same reference as the original. So, if what you suggest is what happened, then the research and its picture are worthless.
 
carefully
@Cerberus Then just doing it in English is bad because 'black' in English is itself problematic.
polysemous
 
@Mitch Are there really any English words that are not polysemous?
 
@Mitch Because of mulattos, you mean?
 
OK @CowperKettle you've really done t now. Posting a random image from the internet and we're all riled up.
 
In the antebellum American South, the law stated that if you were 1/64th Negro, you were all Negro.
 
4:11 PM
@Robusto Exactly.
 
@Robusto Sounds very Germany 1940.
 
@Mitch No, exactly means exactly that. ~_~
@Cerberus Where do you think the Germans learned much of their racism?
 
Although I actually think the Germans were less strict.
@Robusto From Europe!
And the rest of the world.
 
Some of it, especially eugenics, came from the US. And I'm not boasting about that.
 
@Cerberus well that's one possible implication of the use of 'black' (ie mixed parentage counts as black), but that's not what I meant by polysemous, I meant in some contexts it might mean African-American, some, any (subsaharan) lineage, for some any African, for some South Indian, etc etc.
 
4:14 PM
@Robusto Oh, really? How did that happen?
@Mitch What does it have to do with American?
 
@Robusto I don't think the Americans are some original source of racism (but yes, some aspects of how Americans 'did it' were adopted by the Germans.
 
What aspects?
 
@Cerberus oh well hm just
just explaining the polysemy of 'black' but starting from the US, even though that's not involved in Europe.
I'm not sure what the strongest different meanings of 'black' are in the UK
Im guessing 'black Irish' is not actually black?
 
@Mitch I don't really understand.
 
@Cerberus Robusto is looking for some links for you. I think maybe Henry Ford did something? SOmething like Hitler read a book written by someone from the AMerican SOuth>
 
4:19 PM
@Mitch & @Cerberus: The War Against the Weak
 
@Cerberus I don't really understand what you don't understand. Can you be more specific?
 
Amusingly, that book was written by Edwin Black ...
> Black is also correct that the American and German eugenicists were in close contact with each other, especially after World War I: they were working together in international organizations, following and even reporting on developments in eugenics in each other's countries.
The Germans did, in fact, borrow much of their 1933 Law for the Prevention of Hereditarily Defective Offspring (the so-called 'sterilization law') from the model sterilization law drawn up for the various states by Harry H. Laughlin, Superintendent of the ERO, and a number of American eugenicists were impressed with th
 
Thanks, that's interesting.
Could it also be one of the reasons why the Germans insisted that Jews were a "race"?
 
Possibly.
 
I mean, it does not fit standard racial theories.
Which divided humanity in races like white, black, yellow, red.
And variations thereof.
 
4:31 PM
There is a gene shared by Ashkenazy Jews, I understand.
 
I'm sure.
 
But that doesn't make them a separate race.
 
Indeed; I'm sure most ethnic groups have some internally shared genes.
But did they ever talk about the Egyptian race, or the Persian race?
Not that I know.
The Mediterranean race, perhaps sometimes?
 
@Mitch Oops. I posted it and forgot all about it.
 
@CowperKettle you successfully trolled us all.
 
4:35 PM
I thought that the more distant the pair is in terms of ethnicity, the better for their child, because there is less the chance of a genetic error.
I forgot the genetic term.
Heterozygotic ..
..advantage?
A heterozygote advantage describes the case in which the heterozygous genotype has a higher relative fitness than either the homozygous dominant or homozygous recessive genotype. The specific case of heterozygote advantage due to a single locus is known as overdominance. Overdominance is a condition in genetics where the phenotype of the heterozygote lies outside of the phenotypical range of both homozygote parents, and heterozygous individuals have a higher fitness than homozygous individuals. Polymorphism can be maintained by selection favoring the heterozygote, and this mechanism is used to...
 
Doesn't that advantage diminish greatly when the pair are farther apart?
 
I did not know that.
 
I mean, brother with sister is bad.
Brother with cousin is less bad.
The same old village after many generations is somewhat bad.
 
In my father's village the teachers told pupils to find a pair in some distant settlement, because doctors were noticing some genetic diseases. There were too many related marriages.
 
The same city, probably negligible, unless you have a very tight, small circle of families.
 
4:38 PM
@Cerberus In an Audible book I listened to last year, the professor makes the case that the Egyptians were not Black African.
 
Uhh.
Make the case?
 
And so my father's dad picked a wife from 2500 km away.
 
They're not black until you go far south.
 
@Cerberus I'm looking for the PDF that came with the recording, but I can't find it as of yet.
 
@CowperKettle So the next village. It's Russia, after all.
 
4:39 PM
We're talking ancient Egypt, btw.
 
Who ever thought Ancient Egyptians were black?
We have images.
We have literature.
 
@Cerberus Some people try to make the case.
 
That makes little sense to me.
@CowperKettle Is that Jesus? Why blond?
 
It's part of a Black pride thing.
 
4:42 PM
Caravaggio.
Etc.
Titian.
I'm sure he was made blond sometimes, but not normally.
 
As to white, I think his complexion is probably not too far off from a cultured Jew of the time.
Besides, who cares.
 
In Russian icons, he was like this.
 
Yeah, also in other Eastern icons, I think.
 
@CowperKettle As the saying goes, Man makes God in his own image.
 
4:46 PM
 
Buddy Christ!
From Dogma.
 
@CowperKettle chiral Jesus
 
@CowperKettle He looks rather peevish, doesn't he? And note that the eyes don't follow you wherever you stand/sit.
 
@Robusto Yes, of course.
Just ignore those crazy people.
 
@Cerberus He brings them up just to dismiss them, I think.
 
4:49 PM
The Christ Pantocrator of St. Catherine’s Monastery at Sinai is one of the oldest Byzantine religious icons, dating from the 6th century AD. It is the earliest known version of the pantocrator style that still survives today, and is regarded by historians and scholars to be one of the most important and recognizable works in the study of Byzantine art as well as Eastern Orthodox Christianity. == Background == For a time the icon was thought to have been dated from the thirteenth century, since it had been almost completely painted over at that time, but it was concluded in 1962 that it is in fact...
 
That's fine. But I'd just not bring them up.
 
If you're an academic these days, I think you have to go out of your way to dismiss nonsense you imagined had no power over people's minds.
 
That is a pretty cool monastery. So old.
@Robusto I'd rather just ignore it. Giving it attention fuels it.
 
@Cerberus Even if you yourself give no fuel to a fire, the fire has a way of burning things down.
 
> Built between 548 and 565, the monastery is one of the oldest working Christian monasteries in the world.[6][7] The site contains the world's oldest continually operating library
 
4:51 PM
Question, doesn't 'dogma' imply irrationality?
 
@Cerberus I live in a desert, and compared to that mine is a lush garden. That looks like the surface of the moon.
 
@Robusto Nevertheless, I think you should not fuel it and make it larger.
@Robusto Yup, that's a real desert!
 
@M.A.R. How does it?
 
I'm sure there are many gradations of desert.
@M.A.R. I suppose, kind of.
 
@Cerberus That argument doesn't, er, hold water. What you're saying is never make any attempt to put out a fire.
 
4:53 PM
@Mitch maybe because I've mostly read it in the context of, say, religion, from disgruntled Pasta worshippers or something.
 
Not never.
But hardly ever.
An attempt is bad if it makes the fire worse.
 
But MW uses "medical dogma", and I don't feel comfortable with that phrase.
 
MW?
To mean what?
 
Dogma means unquestionable belief, I'd say.
Few things should be unquestionable.
 
4:55 PM
> Saint Catherine is considered to be one of the coldest towns in Egypt with Nekhel and many other places especially in mountainous Sinai. Infrequent snowfalls in Saint Catherine take place during the winter months of December, January and February, however snow has also occurred in late autumn and early spring.
 
@M.A.R. I think of rationality as a method of creating knowledge and dogma as just a collection of knowledge. So I don't think of dogma as inherently irrational. But dogma is usually unmoving with extra data which is irrational. There's an association but not necessity.
 
Turns out the weather is not very hot, because of an elevation of 1500 m. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…
 
@Cerberus Example sentence: She repeated medical dogma against eating sugar.
 
In classical Greek, dogma actually just meant "belief", without the connotation of strictness and unalterability that it has in the modern languages.
@M.A.R. That would have a negative connotation.
 
@M.A.R. Wait so donuts are heterodox?
 
4:56 PM
It even has snowfalls
 
@M.A.R. She is repeating something which she ought perhaps to question or nuance.
 
@Mitch metadox
 
@CowperKettle Is that the monastery?
 
97.5% of people eating donuts are portrayed as obese.
I'll let you decide the doxing
 
@Cerberus Almost - it's the town located 2 km from the monastery
 
4:58 PM
Aren't donuts deep fried?
 
@Cerberus do many people think of it neutrally though?
 
@CowperKettle Still nice.
 
@M.A.R. I really don't want to know where they live.
 
It sounds like the precision of linguists.
 
But
I would like to know the address of the nearest donut shop
haha I'm kidding I know -exactly- where they all are.
 
4:59 PM
@M.A.R. Neutrally, how?
 
@Mitch But then you'd be portrayed as obese
 
If you were of some orthodox religion, you would take various dogmas seriously and consider them positive things.
 
@Cerberus as meaning "set of beliefs", without the extra scorn for said beliefs
 
my beliefs are true, but yours are heterodox
 
I would say, no, unless you were an orthodox believer who believed in dogmata.
 
5:00 PM
@Mitch no u
 
@M.A.R. I'm sorry, my karma ran over your dogma
 
Most people do not favour unquestionable beliefs.
Or unquestionable theories, let's say.
 
@Cerberus ... for other people
 
@Mitch oh madog
 
For anyone, I should think.
 
5:02 PM
not for themselves
 
@Cerberus yet no one considers their own beliefs to be unquestionable
 
@M.A.R. Why not?
Many orthodox people do, I should think?
If the Pope dixit, it is dogma to some Catholics.
 
people aren't walking around as skeptical philosophers, about to make a step and wondering "What is nature? What is a solid really? Will my foot land on solid ground or fall through the earth?"
 
I'd say unquestioned does not necessarily mean unquestionable?
 
@Mitch I forebore to trot out that well-worn trope. Thought about it, but didn't do it. I now feel morally superior to you in some small aspect.
 
5:04 PM
@Cerberus I'm saying that an orthodox follower of a religion would not consider their beliefs to be unquestionable, they'd all have some sort of reasoning behind them, even if shallow or contradictory. So an orthodox person would still refer to the stuff he doesn't like as "dogmatic", and not their own set of beliefs
 
@Robusto Good for you!
Literally!
 
beams in a self-satisfied way
 
@Robusto It's only well-worn for us olds. Kids these days need to be taught the right path to groaning punnery
 
@Robusto Damn Flanders
 
@M.A.R. Well, I do think orthodox people consider some of their beliefs to be unquestionable.
 
5:06 PM
Wat...
 
The word dogma is a religious term, after all.
 
@Mitch Well, according to @Cerberus, there is some nonsense that one should just ignore.
 
It's only well worn here by...
...me.
 
@Mitch Interesting that Ice Boy is the only one who put some interesting spin on the trope. Make of that what you will.
 
sighs
> Formally, the term dogma has been used by some theistic religious groups to describe the body of positions forming the group's most central, foundational, or essential beliefs, ... In some cases dogma is distinguished from religious opinion and those things in doctrine considered less significant or uncertain. Formal church dogma is often clarified and elaborated upon in its communication.
 
5:09 PM
@Cerberus The word itself is from Greek, innit?
 
ipse dixit
 
> The term originated in late Greek philosophy legal usage, in which it meant a decree or command, and came to be used in the same sense in early Christian theology.
@Robusto Yes.
16 mins ago, by Cerberus
In classical Greek, dogma actually just meant "belief", without the connotation of strictness and unalterability that it has in the modern languages.
 
@Cerberus OK. Still, the neutral sense gives me scholarly vibes, but if I see it anywhere else, I'll assume it has negative connotations
 
@M.A.R. I don't understand what you mean by that.
 
@Cerberus I can't keep up with all the back-and-forth in chat. sigh
 
5:11 PM
aren't Latin dicere and Greek dogma cognate?
 
But, if a non-religious scholar used the word, I'd assume it was used with a negative connotation: something that is not questioned but possibly should.
 
@Mitch six times in eight years. I applaud your restraint
 
@Mitch I think so.
 
@M.A.R. bows
I endeavor to give satisfaction
 
Repeat medical dogma = probably negative.
 
5:13 PM
More importantly, for all North Hemisphereans here now, are all the leaves off your trees now?
 
@Robusto We should hire an army of moneys to type the most obvious stuff.
 
@Cerberus yeah that sounds negative
 
@Mitch I shall look, the next time I venture outside.
 
@Cerberus I thought that was already the case ...
 
No trees in my narrow street.
 
5:14 PM
@Cerberus um... aren't we already doing that?
 
jinx
 
@Robusto Touchés.
 
@Cerberus glance out a window
@Cerberus Oh
@Robusto cripes
 
@Mitch most of them, I think
 
@M.A.R. Aren't those last scraggly leaves, barely holding on for dear life sort of ... pathetic?
Just give it up already
 
5:15 PM
@Mitch And you get up two hours earlier than I do, more or less, so you don't have the excuse of the early bird getting the worm.
 
> Christianity is defined by a set of core beliefs shared by virtually all Christians, ... When formally communicated by the organization, these beliefs are sometimes referred to as 'dogmata'.
 
@Mitch No, I think some trees just don't give up their leaves. Bad weather? Pollution? Sick tree? No idea
 
@Robusto I'm not actually a functioning human being until midday. But then that's when I give up, like the last leaf of fall. Also
Mahlzeit!
 
Bon appetit!
 
@Mitch People in Nigeria will be looking in vain, I fear.
 
5:18 PM
@Mitch No, not at all. Some of the trees in my yard have only just begun to shed.
 
Blond jesus
there's your proof
also...pretty cool t-chirt
 
He's almost Errol Flynn.
 
blue eyed
 
Remember short-hair jesus?
 
@Mitch Who made that?
And when?
 
5:21 PM
Probably it's fairly recent.
 
Right.
Blond Jesus is not very realistic, but who cares.
 
36 mins ago, by Robusto
@CowperKettle As the saying goes, Man makes God in his own image.
I once heard of a rock band called "Black Jesus and the Gay Disciples" ...
 
@Cerberus 2nd c AD
says so on the package
their choice of the present tense
 
@Mitch 2nd m, rather?
 
5:37 PM
@Mitch So Ernest Borgnine was actually Jesus?
 
@Cerberus just messing around. paintings didn't exist in 2 c AD
@Robusto They explain that Jesus was not particularly good looking. So
 
@Mitch Uhh why not?
 
@Mitch So cave paintings are fake news, you're saying?
More recently: The Paintings of Pompeii.
One assumes the Romans didn't suddenly forget how to paint between the 1st and 2nd centuries CE.
 
@Robusto They certainly forgot how to do concrete; painting is much more complex than concrete; ergo they could much more easily forget how to paint between the 1st and 2nd c
Look man this is just science
To be fair, the concrete that the Romans used was a little different than modern concrete.
 
6:15 PM
I am disappointed Charlie Baker is not running for reelection in Massachusetts.
 
6:27 PM
I am disappointed Vladimir Putin is running for reelection in Russia in 2024.
Maybe Charlie Baker should give it a try instead in Russia.
987 teachers in the Sverdlovsk Region refused to take the vaccine, and were dismissed. Now there's a shortage of teachers znak.com/2021-12-01/…
Or maybe there is no shortage. The article does not say that.
It says that in Yekaterinburg, 94.7% of teachers have been vaccinated.
@Robusto This band would land in jail in Russia.
Some 300+ Jehova's Witnesses have been so far indicted in Russia, some of them getting real jail terms of several years.
> Supreme Court Justice Harlan Fiske Stone once quipped, "I think the Jehovah's Witnesses ought to have an endowment in view of the aid which they give in solving the legal problems of civil liberties."
For some reason, Russia's police and FSB are really after the Witnesses.
They have used specialized equipment to tap their meetings in order to prove that they preach their kind of faith there.
 
7:07 PM
@CowperKettle What is the (presumably) untranslated name of the band 'Pussy Riot' and does it have the multiple meanings that the English label has?
 
@Mitch They picked an English name from the start
 
Oh
so there's no Russian name?
 
I don't understand the meaning of "brush up your X salaam", whether it's Friday or Sunday
@Mitch no, there's no Russian name
 
I'm sort of saddened.
sort of
not reaally
 
Some Russian groups have English names
Uma2rman (ранее «Уматурман», «Uma2rmaH») — российская рок-группа из Нижнего Новгорода. Изначально состояла из братьев Кристовских — Сергея и Владимира, которые назвали группу в честь любимой актрисы Умы Турман. В дальнейшем для концертов были наняты дополнительные музыканты: Сергей Солодкин — барабаны, Юрий Терлецкий — соло-гитара, Алексей Каплун — клавишные, Александр Абрамов — саксофон, Сергей Серов — тромбон. Приобрела известность после песен: «Прасковья», «Ума Турман», «Проститься», а также песни, звучавшей в финальных титрах фильма «Ночной Дозор». Также группа спела заглавную песню к ситкому...
«Маркше́йдер Кунст» (нем. Markscheider — «горный инженер», Kunst — «искусство») — музыкальная группа, образованная в 1992 году студентами-маркшейдерами в Санкт-Петербурге. В начале предпочтение отдавалось стилю жёсткого рокабилли, но потом в творчестве группы стали все отчётливее появляться элементы блюза, а позже — латино, ямайские и этнические мотивы. == Состав == === Текущий состав === Сергей Ефременко (ЕФР) — вокал, гитара, автор текстов Кирилл Оськин — бас-гитара, контрабас Даниил Прокопьев — барабаны Кирилл Ипатов — перкуссия Владимир Матушкин — гитара, перкуссия Денис Рачков — акустическая...
Tequilajazzz (Теки́ладжа́з) — российская рок-группа, играющая альтернативный и экспериментальный рок. Коллектив был образован в 1993 году в Санкт-Петербурге. Наиболее известные песни группы: «Звери» (альбом «Вирус», 1997) «Зимнее солнце» (альбом «Целлулоид»,1998). В июне 2009 года вышел альбом «Журнал живого», опубликованный группой в интернете для свободного скачивания. 17 июля 2010 года на официальном сайте группы появилось сообщение о распаде коллектива. В 2016 году группа собралась вновь, чтобы выступить с юбилейным туром. Кроме того, был записан акустический альбом. == История == Официальным...
This one has some nice songs
Not superb, but nice
We also have some famous rapper named Oxxxymiron, but I never listened to his songs.
I only know him via Twitter mentions.
Like "Oxxxymiron was mistaken for the new COVID strain and taken into quarantine".
The Russian pronunciation of his name, oksimiron is close to omikron
I personally like the very old rock group Aquarium (Akvarium), founded in the late 1970s
Because his lyrics are very much like Bob Dylan's
They are sometimes without overt sense.
So you can imagine some sense that you like.
This song is dedicated to one of chief TV propagandist of the Putin regime.
After this song, people started calling this propagandist the way he is called in the song.
Mudozvon is a Russian swear word that means "someone who jingles with his balls". An empty talker, a bullshitter.
mudi is an Old Russian word for "balls", antique word.
zvon is "the sound of something ringing" (like bells)
So, the title of the song, Vecherniy Mudozvon is "Evening Bullshitter"
With "evening" in the adjective sense.
Like your usual evening TV anchor who appears to tell you propagandist bullshit every evening )))
Here's the propagandist.
Vladimir Rudolfovich Solovyov (Russian: Владимир Рудольфович Соловьёв, born October 20, 1963) is a Russian journalist, television presenter, radio host and propagandist. He is best known being an anchor on the television show Sunday evening with Vladimir Solovyov on Russia-1. He graduated from the Moscow Institute of Steel and Alloys and completed a post-doc position at the Institute of World Economy and International Relations. == Early life == Vladimir Solovyov was born into a Jewish family. His father, Rudolf Naumovich Solovyov (born Vinitskovsky), and his mother, Inna Solomonovna Solovyova...
He has a cozy house in Italy
> He is best known being an anchor on the television show Sunday evening with Vladimir Solovyov on Russia-1.
Much loved by Vladimir Putin.
> In May 2020, the change.org platform started collecting signatures for banning Vladimir Solovyov from entering Italy and the EU. The petition was addressed to the Italian Interior Minister, Luciana Lamorgese, and received the support of more than 200,000 people.
 
7:41 PM
Omicron now in California — SF
 
Omicron is fast. I'll wait a couple of weeks before reading any research about it. It's too early. But it will be interesting to read.
 
7:58 PM
@CowperKettle That looks and reads like in English like 'oxymoron' which has the opposite stress from 'omikron' (in English).
 
8:11 PM
@CowperKettle if that Russian Joe Rogan is a journalist then I'm a Nobel laureate
 

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