« first day (4037 days earlier)      last day (60 days later) » 

3:24 AM
@Mitch sure it does. I'm saying the reason the virus appears in the lower respiratory tract is not because of the cough; droplets have to be of a very specific size to be able to get there, and it's instead because the virus has reached those cells through blood
@Cerberus a single Human Immunodeficiency Virus, i.e. the capsid + viral genome and proteins
Think drugs for asthma. They're either very fine powders or aerosols. The pressure is calculated to be in a very narrow range; big droplets (or powders) would not reach the alveoli and very small droplets (or powders) would remain suspended in the air and then exhaled.
@CowperKettle let the horse have cake
2
 
3:41 AM
@tchrist do you have a minute to talk about our lord and savior Catalytic converter?
It's probably prolonged a few thousand years of life by now.
Even if it was commonplace in Iran (and probably lots of places) to just throw them away after they were used up instead of replacing them
And our gasoline and diesel smells like cancer.
 
@M.A.R. I'm sure my Cats already converted me back during the toxoplasmotic crusades.
 
Oh crap, that's one huge reason I can't have a cat
Also maybe the anti-pet culture here
And cleaning the litter
 
Mine don't have hitlers. They just go outside.
 
Also the fact that we're fifth floor
 
Never realized how highly cast you were.
 
3:47 AM
Also maybe because sometimes my mind is like a malfunctioning Windows XP and I'd sit on them
@tchrist better view of the developing world pollution
 
Could you just get a back scratcher instead of sitting on them?
 
In hindsight, the reason we don't go hiking much anymore is how depressing it was to see the smog on top of a hill
 
Oh, you have hindsight. That explains why you'd sit on them.
 
@tchrist reminds me, the rural side of my family had these backscratchers at their homes and I found them pretty funny
 
Well sure. You need one for every bedroom or floor.
That, or cats.
 
3:50 AM
@tchrist processing visual feedback is just so much work, it's just too much sometimes
@tchrist With my luck, the scratching would infect the cat instead
Vets are probably way more expensive here
 
I don't see why your rural family should have a monopoly on goats.
 
Alright, need to run some errands. o/
@tchrist that goat thing is a hurtful stereotype. We actually mostly just herd sheep.
Make for better prophets
The herders, not the sheep
 
Goat horns sound better.
Herding sheep makes you lazy. Try cats.
German shepherds aren't as highly prized as Austrian goatherds.
Or do you live in one of those places where the eagles pull the goats off the mountain sides?
I just caught my cat coonherding out the back door. This may not end well.
 
4:23 AM
 
4:49 AM
 
I thought an Ornicron was the turkey timer for the oven.
 
5:44 AM
> - I love you like a brother.
- Does that mean that we are only friends?
- No, silly, don't you remember that I'm from the House of Habsburg.
 
 
2 hours later…
8:06 AM
The Cox–Zucker machine is an algorithm created by David A. Cox and Steven Zucker. This algorithm determines whether a given set of sections provides a basis (up to torsion) for the Mordell–Weil group of an elliptic surface E → S, where S is isomorphic to the projective line.The algorithm was first published in the 1979 article "Intersection numbers of sections of elliptic surfaces" by Cox and Zucker and was later named the "Cox–Zucker machine" by Charles Schwartz in 1984. The name is a homophone for an obscenity, and this was a deliberate move by Cox and Zucker, who conceived of the idea of...
 
9:02 AM
Álvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈalβaɾ ˈnũɲeθ kaˈβeθa ðe ˈβaka] (listen); c. 1488/1490/1492 – c. 1557/1558/1559/1560) was a Spanish explorer of the New World, and one of four survivors of the 1527 Narváez expedition. During eight years of traveling across what is now the US Southwest, he became a trader and faith healer to various Native American tribes before reconnecting with Spanish civilization in Mexico in 1536. After returning to Spain in 1537, he wrote an account, first published in 1542 as La relación y comentarios ("The Account and Commentaries"), which in later editions...
> one of four survivors of the 1527 Narváez expedition. During eight years of traveling across what is now the US Southwest, he became a trader and faith healer to various Native American tribes before reconnecting with Spanish civilization in Mexico in 1536
Survived for 8 years among unexplored and uncontacted peoples of Florida.
 
 
5 hours later…
1:44 PM
Hello
 
@M.A.R. LOL
 
2:32 PM
> I will lay odds that, ere this year expire,
We bear our civil swords and native fire
As far as France: I heard a bird so sing,
Whose music, to my thinking, pleased the king.
 
 
1 hour later…
3:34 PM
@tchrist eagles only exist in the northern provinces below the Caspian sea or lake or whatever. We're really good at ruining our wildlife, you know.
 
 
1 hour later…
4:53 PM
@M.A.R. At first I thought your national bird was a "night eagle", but no. :)
> GK: aēdṓn (ἀηδών)
EL: aïdóni (αηδόνι)
HU: csalogány
CY: eos
NL: nachtegaal
DE: Nachtigall
SV: näktergal
DK: nattergal
NO: nattergal
EN: nightingale
LB: Nuechtegall
RO: privighetoare
FR: rossignol
CA: rossinyol
CL: rousinol
PT: rouxinol
ES: ruiseñor
FI: satakieli
CS: slavík
PO: słowik
RU: solovey (соловей)
IT: usignolo
Why are is the Welsh so weird?
 
Over the last 12 months (Dec 2020 - Nov 2021 inclusive) Russia's natural population loss (births minus deaths) amounted to 990 000 people currenttime.tv/a/smertnost-v-rossii-rekord/31587247.html
The highest loss since 1945
Migration from former Soviet states has helped Russia maintain its population on a level. We shall see what happens.
Russia's population has been losing 2700 people a day for the last 12 months. But that excludes the immigration. With immigration, we might still be in the plus.
Before Covid, Russia's record-high year in terms of lethality was 2003, when a total of 2.37 mn people died.
This was overshot in 2020, when 2.41 mn died.
This year, the expected total deaths will amount to 2.45 mn.
I wonder why so many people died back in 2003
1994 was the most shocking year, when the war in Chechnya started.
Boris Yeltsin at first tried to use "anonymous" soldiers, just like Vladimir Putin now in Ukraine.
These "anonymous" soldiers were taken prisoners in the fall of 1994, and paraded on TV screens by human rights activists who helped save them.
The FSB and the Army started really hating the human rights activists from then on.
The regime sent young soldiers and expected them to fight or die, like pieces of meat. And suddenly some fuckers brought the scheme up and uncovered the plot.
Russia's people also started hating human rights activists. I remember a huge graffiti on a wall in Yekaterinburg "Правозатычник Ковалев" (Human Fucks Activist Kovalyov)
Sergei Adamovich Kovalyov (also spelled Sergey Kovalev; Russian: Сергей Адамович Ковалёв; 2 March 1930 – 9 August 2021) was a Russian human rights activist and politician. During the Soviet period he was a dissident and, after 1975, a political prisoner. == Early career and arrest == Kovalyov was born in the town of Seredyna-Buda, near Sumy (in Soviet Union, now Ukraine). In 1932, his family moved to Podlipki village near Moscow. In 1954, Kovalyov graduated from Moscow State University and in 1964 he gained a PhD in biophysics. As a biophysicist, Kovalyov was author of more than 60 scientific...
Russian people has always hated those who tried to preserve humanity.
Because if you fight for human rights, you're a puppet of the West.
> From Grozny, he witnessed the realities of the First Chechen War. His daily reports via telephone and on TV galvanized Russian public opinion against the war. For his activism, he was removed from his post in the Duma in 1995.[14] In 1994, he was awarded the Homo Homini Award for human rights activism by the Czech group People in Need.[15]
A new type of artificial intelligence, known as transformational machine learning, can learn from solving multiple problems, for example, during drug development, and improve its own performance while doing so -- clinicalomics.com/machine-learning/…
They always come up with good-sounding names like "deep neural networks" and "transformational machine learning".
 
6:12 PM
 
@CowperKettle once again, the authors are expecting that the term 'transformational' will do all the heavy lifting.
In a cursory (or is desultory) reading of the paper, it looks like it's not total bullshit. i.e their primary transgression is using the word 'transformational' in order to make you think that their methods are literally transformational.
Their methods seem like they are combining some other ML methods. They point out 'stacking', where you intentionally train models to feed into other models (and then possibly to feed into more) and you're training -all- these models together at the same time. And 'transfer' learning is using -pretrained- models and building new models with those.
And MTL (multi-task models) is just interpolating multiple functions ('interpolation' is a synonym of supervised learning) from one data set. These are all both well worn techniques. and often used together.
I can't really judge the biology. But if they can discover new drugs with their combination of ML techniques, then that's great. After the title, the contents of the article don't seem lke bullshit.
It -is- PNAS which does not have a heavy ML peer review board (they're like the next try after Science of Nature for biology articles).
And the article reads like it is trying to teach newcomers to ML what it is, which is what sophomores to a subject do.
 
 
1 hour later…
7:36 PM
Thank you for the explanation!
Moscow just had its heaviest rain since 1952 rosbalt.ru/moscow/2021/11/30/1933452.html
We also had rain a couple of hours ago. Very unusual.
Very warm.
 
7:59 PM
Word of the day: tacking
In Russian: overshtag, from Dutch overstag
One of the rare cases when I understand the term when I listen an English audiobook, but have to look up the Russian name of the term.
I was listening to a book about Columbus
Turned out a good book, despite poor reviews.
I'd like to listen to this book by the same auhtor goodreads.com/book/show/174354.Over_the_Edge_of_the_World
 
8:17 PM
@CowperKettle Yes, overstag (gaan) is the term!
And do you know what it is called when you do it the wrong way, tightening the rope in the wrong direction before attempting to go overstag?
Geipen.
Or is it gijpen?
I don't know.
 
 
1 hour later…
9:25 PM
@Cerberus ??
the wrong way?
the 'other' way, turning -away- from the wind, is called 'jibing' in English.
It's slightly more dangerous than tacking because the sail (or sails), suddenly swing over to the other side when the wind catches them.
Is that what you're thinking of?
in small sail boats it can pull the boat over on its side, or whack you in the head with the boom
 
@Mitch Exactly!
The boom is the problem, probably unless you hold the rope really tight and in the right direction away from the sail into the new wind.
 
9:40 PM
@Cerberus Oh I think I see what you're doing with the rope (the 'sheet' in English)
which reminds me, you have to watch out for the book flying over your head -and- make sure you don't get caught in the sheet if it's too loose.
 
@Mitch Ohh right! Of course.
I was thinking, what was the Dutch name of that rope again?
It is the/a schoot.
 
sailors have a different word for everything
 
Indeed.
 
and the words you think you already know are for something else entirely
 
@Mitch Yeah, we were drilled to watch out for that as children.
@Mitch Often enough!
I had never connected schoot to sheet until now.
 
9:44 PM
@Cerberus I remember there were things you always had to say out loud to make sure everybody was ready to switch sides or to get out of the way for those who need to move about (and duck when the boom jerks overhead)
@Cerberus I still haven't connected them
 
Yes!
@Mitch But what was it?
 
I bet all the sailor vocab in English came a lot from Dutch
 
@Mitch Just put them together and apply the correct knot.
@Mitch Much of it, yes.
 
@Cerberus OMG the knots
I bet English 'ship' is Dutch derived
@Cerberus Oh
"PREPARE TO COME ABOUT"
and then
"COMING ABOUT"
I think that's when you tack
and for jibing
"HARD TO LEE"
and then
"Wow that looked like it hurt"
 
@Mitch Maybe!
It's awfully close.
@Mitch Impressive.
 
9:48 PM
or could be just plain old cognates
 
I really can't remember.
@Mitch But they are so close, while German has Schiff.
 
like 'skiff' is ... scandinavian?
 
I'm pretty sure skipper is from schipper, though.
Maybe skiff is from Scandinavian.
I really wish I remembered what we would say become going overstag.
 
@Cerberus I think German has more sound changes (from West German) than either English or Dutch
 
I don't know about that.
 
9:51 PM
Like.. which eas it... Grimm's law or Verner's law where intermedial t goes to s: water> Wasser
In historical linguistics, the High German consonant shift or second Germanic consonant shift is a phonological development (sound change) that took place in the southern parts of the West Germanic dialect continuum in several phases. It probably began between the third and fifth centuries and was almost complete before the earliest written records in High German were produced in the eighth century. The resulting language, Old High German, can be neatly contrasted with the other continental West Germanic languages, which for the most part did not experience the shift, and with Old English, which...
 
> Klaar om te wenden?
I think that's what you say, "ready to turn?".
And then some other formulae at different points of the procedure.
 
@Cerberus do you say anything when you push the tiller over?
 
I think then you say "ree".
If I understand the text correctly.
 
like "I'll throw you the lifevest and come back to pick you up"
 
I haven't sailed in...a decade?
You can say that.
 
9:54 PM
@Cerberus No I can't say that
hm..well yes I can.
would I be telling the truth?
I don't know.
I tried to go surfboarding recently
I could do it really well on land
but in the water I just couldn't figure it out
 
I think it's very difficult.
 
It took me those split seconds too long to get up on the board.
and then when I was up on the board I didn't get the front/back balance right and the front or back end would go down in the water too much and I'd founder
or flounder
or both
@Cerberus I don't think it's difficult in general
 
I just couldn't figure it out.
It's also surprisingly tiring. You'd think you'd get up on the board and you're just standing there, but somehow every run (or whatever you call a single wave ride) was exhausting.
 
I am not surprised.
 
10:00 PM
I did get up a couple times. And by that I mean literally twice.
 
I probably couldn't!
 
I fee like they should have a surfboard with a chair on it.
you know, to make it easier?
 
Practical.
Perhaps with an engine, too?
Or a span of whales?
 
@Cerberus oh. yeah. so you don't have to rely on always going the direction of the waves.
 
Yes.
 
10:04 PM
@Cerberus oh that's silly. they would never fit.
maybe otters?
 
And it helps to move the heavy chairboard.
 
no
you can't harness otters
 
Why would they not fit?
The sea is fairly spacious.
Were you surfing in your bath tub?
 
I mean I don't want to blubber-shame the whales, but they're a kinda on the roundish side of things.
@Cerberus Oh,
hm.
No
No I wasn't
At least
well
 
I see.
 
10:06 PM
anyway let's forget the bathtub
so maybe whales would work
but
that'd be a pretty big board
also, what if they dive?
 
You need to make friends with them first.
 
oh
what, do you like have a drink with them first?
Isn't that a bit uncomfortable for everybody?
 
Why?
There could be whales in this room, who knows?
 
you have this tiny tiny glass, and they're just gulping down gallons at a time?
 
Don't size them!!
That really isn't done.
 
10:16 PM
I mean... they have to give their size to get fitted for like shoes and stuff
OMG
I'm sorry
I mean I can't swim that fast
so
 
10:59 PM
@Mitch YOU WERE DOING IT
So sizist.
 

« first day (4037 days earlier)      last day (60 days later) »