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2:09 AM
Hey hey.
 
:O
Jun 9 at 4:19, by skullpatrol
Come to think of it, I haven't seen cornbread ninja in a long time.
looong time pal @cornbreadninja麵包忍者
 
How've you been?
 
fine thanks, how about you?
 
Pretty good.
Fireworks just started going off.
 
what's the occasion?
 
2:17 AM
This church a few blocks away had a 5k this evening.
 
(other than your return to the chat :)
 
Ha!
So tchrist has been missing?
 
yup
:(
the Chiefs had a good year
 
truth
What's been going on around here?
 
nothing much, been soo quiet without most of the regulars...
(that includes you)
 
i gotta run, cya pal
 
3:11 AM
Sea shores sea sells by the she shells.
 
 
2 hours later…
5:08 AM
hope everyone is having a splendid meat of night sandwich (ie, day)
 
 
3 hours later…
8:16 AM
My day is boring
@Tonepoet . . . yes.
 
 
4 hours later…
12:22 PM
I need a single word or better phrase for "coming generation" intending the next generation and generations that follow. The word is not progeny, but likely a synonym.
@M.A.R.ಠ_ಠ hopefully, boring enough that it can bore a hole through the ice wall in this room that keeps it so silent today.
 
12:46 PM
offspring? or simply children
successors, inheritors...
decendant
 
 
1 hour later…
1:56 PM
@skullpatrol In a business context, like how they say "next-gen" technology.
@skullpatrol Good try, but these words sound too personal to oneself.
 
2.0
pronounced "two point oh"
"new-gen" is used a lot also
 
 
1 hour later…
3:05 PM
What are these people called in English? :)
The Farsi word used to have a poignant metaphorical use in Farsi poetry. Dunno about the English word.
(They are gathering leftover grain, if it's not clear)
 
 
1 hour later…
4:36 PM
@Færd Grain gatherer is actually a somewhat significant colocate in Christian theology if I recall correctly. I am not sure if it is limited to the left-over grain though, if that is significant.
What are they called in Farsi anyway?
> So I take the expression to be this, in our Modern Dialect, What hath this Haranguer or Holder-forth to say? or, more literally, What New Doctrine does this Grain-gatherer pretend to advance? And feeling Paul and they were now in the Market-place which perhaps used to be haunted by Fowls to pick up scattered grain, this word might be deign'd as an Anthenian Punn or Witticism.
Page 429 of The Loganthsopos; or, A Discourt Concerning Christ as He is The Logos, Made Man. Being the Third Book of Christology by Robert Flemming, Printed by J. Henreys for Andrew Bell at the Cross-Keys and Bible in Cornhill. (1707)
 
 
1 hour later…
6:05 PM
@Tonepoet Thanks. The word that I had in mind was gleaner. I guess the grain-gatherers are visible in the background of this pictures (barely tho, because of low resolution), and the poor people in the forefront are gleaning the left-over grain.
@Tonepoet Interesting. It's used as a derogatory epithet.
 
6:21 PM
@Færd The name of that painting is 'The Gleaners' in English (but really Des glaneuses in French). It's a weird sounding word in English (and I first heard the word when presented with that painting.) 'to glean' though is more common is sort of a fancy word for gather (and I don't associate it with poverty, 'to scavenge' might).
But it is associated with the laws in Deuteronomy and Leviticus in the Torah and Old Testament, where it is intended as a way of not being cruel to poor people by leaving something for them to pick up from fields after a harvest.
 
@Færd Apparently Gleaner is a valid word in English, both Noah Webster and the American Heritage Dictionary 5th ed. attest it.
I never really thought about what the word glean literally meant before now though. It is more often used in figurative contexts of inferring scant amounts of knowledge.
It is most particularly in the phrasal verb glean from in that manner.
@Mitch Gleaner doesn't appear in the King James Bible though. Just glean as a verb. Glean/gleaned appears in it about a dozen verses though.
I mean, about a couple dozen. Maybe one score exactly come to think of it.
 
6:54 PM
Y'know, on second thought I might have thought about what glean meant before, and assumed it meant gleam. Do you think that might be why Gleaner sounds strange @Mitch? The concept of a gleamer does not really make too much sense.
 
7:12 PM
@Tonepoet Me neither. Right.
@Tonepoet It always called the name Glenn to my mind. Maybe a glimmer of gleam too.
 
7:35 PM
@Færd Now you've made me wonder why glimmer differs so significantly from gleam.
@Færd The figure of speech makes a considerable amount of sense though, in retrospect.
 
7:50 PM
Also, this has made me think of Chrono Trigger:
 
 
1 hour later…
9:08 PM
@Tonepoet Funny.
 

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