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1:11 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Pattern-matching website in answer (80): Is it ever correct to use "on" after "continue"? by user1949723 on english.SE
 
1:43 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Pattern-matching website in answer (80): Is it ever correct to use "on" after "continue"? by user1949723 on english.SE
 
 
2 hours later…
3:55 AM
@Færd Thanks for the suggestion. It got a lot of laughs. You know why.
 
 
4 hours later…
8:05 AM
@Mitch Hahaha sure. I'm curious how many people you got to try that on in such a short interval.
 
 
1 hour later…
9:08 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Pattern-matching website in answer (80): Is it ever correct to use "on" after "continue"? by user1949723 on english.SE
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Pattern-matching website in answer (80): Is it ever correct to use "on" after "continue"? by user1949723 on english.SE
 
9:47 AM
@SmokeDetector nah, looks legit.
 
 
2 hours later…
11:33 AM
@Færd It was at a Nowruz party. It got a good laugh in that it was slightly risqué, and I could only half pronounce it so people had to really work to figure out what I was saying.
But to totally drain any humor out of it, linguistically speaking, isn't 'dombe' kind of weird? I don't think I've ever heard the 'mb' combination in Farsi ever.
 
12:23 PM
why isn't the opposite of "disappointed" "reappointed"?
 
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Blacklisted website in body, potentially bad keyword in body, potentially bad keyword in title, potentially bad keyword in username (102): Legends Keto - Best Calorie-Burning Supplement by Legends Keto on english.SE
 
 
1 hour later…
1:31 PM
@MattE.Эллен why isn't the opposite of "disgruntled" "gruntled"?
 
@Mitch there's a conspiracy. they want us to think the language is irregular so they can turn it against us
 
 
2 hours later…
3:13 PM
@MattE.Эллен You might infer that I prefer refer to defer.
fer crissakes
 
3:24 PM
chris cakes?
 
3:47 PM
I thought he only came in wafers.
 
4:22 PM
He wavers and quakes.
 
I can't find the answer to this but I am curouis
Why are often banknotes, called "bills"?
It's doesn't make sense to me.
I don't see the connection
 
 
1 hour later…
5:46 PM
@Cerberus Jello'd be thy name.
@MattE.Эллен So has it been long enough to get a consensus on the 'subjunctive' undeleting?
And what consensus do you see?
 
Let me take a look at it
Yes
@Mitch Any idea why is "Bill" at least in NA is more popular than "note"?
Why is "note" more official?
 
@Mitch I figured I'd wait until monday in case people had weekend opinions, but at the moment I'm happy to undelete it
 
6:01 PM
@MattE.Эллен Monday's fine, but maybe make a comment on my OP to that effect.
@MathCubes Is it? I rarely use 'note' for any kind of paper money. I'm sure at banks , 'note' might rise in frequency compared to mine but Im not sure enough to overtake 'bill'
 
?'
British people say note
And money European
s
 
@MathCubes OK. I'm AmE. I don't know whether that's true or not, but you'd have to be clever about a NGrams search or coca search to compare
 
Same
I am just wondering why
 
@MathCubes I don't understand your elision here.
 
6:03 PM
I can't find any info on it online
Unless I am not looking at it right
@Mitch Also on them, they say "note"
 
@MathCubes "Also on them"? I don't understand.
 
The United States Dollars (bills/notes)
 
Europeans don't tend to speak English, so how is 'money' a word that 'Europeans' use?
 
@Mitch the ones that speak English and yes, many do.
 
As a foreign language?
 
6:06 PM
As an a second language that they use almost on a daily basis
 
What about inflation? And the exchange rate?
 
I don't know. I know when I am talking to them. They say like "5 Euro Note" Or when I show them a 2 dollar bill, the are stock by it and says something like "is that a two dollar American note?".
 
@MathCubes I don't think you can call 'European English as a foreign language' a coherent thing, but if it is, it's an attempt to match British or American English (sorry ANZ/CAN/SIN/NIG!)
 
It's mostly British English
 
@MathCubes You said first that they tend to say 'money'.
 
6:09 PM
Where?
 
So what are you saying they say? 'note'? Sure, I suppose Europeans tend to follow BrE more likely.
 
BrE note ~ AmE bill
 
Yeah
 
6 mins ago, by MathCubes
And money European
 
But @F
Oops
 
6:10 PM
@MattE.Эллен Do you tend to say note or bill for paper money?
 
Europeans says "note", where as anyone form North America will say "bill"
 
@Mitch Domb is a funny version (and maybe some dialect) of what you'd call dom (tail) in standard Farsi.
And oh yes, lost of 'mb's in Farsi.
 
But officially on North American paper money, it has on them "note" and no mention of "bill"
 
What Europeans say is immaterial.
 
Why?
 
6:13 PM
Because there's no "Standard European English". Unless you mean BrE or a sub-dialect thereof.
 
But its still the language
There are so many dialects without a standard
A standard dialect is usually the one that is used the most central region of such country.
 
Standards are set by those who speak the language natively.
Others tend/try to follow one of the dialects.
Or mix and match, as I do.
 
Standard Arabic, for example, is mostly the Egyptian dialect.
Standard Swedish is the most central dialect in Sweden. Someone on the border can understand themselves better than their central dialect.
 
I don't know about Swedish, but no, you're wrong about Standard Arabic.
 
@Færd Not really, its their government, and they usually pick the most central dialect cause its the most understandable.
@Færd How am I wrong with Arabic? I know some native Arabic speakers...
 
6:19 PM
What does that have to do with Europeans speaking English as a second language?
I fail to follow. Sorry.
 
@Færd It doesn't matter if their is no standard for it
 
Hello @MattE.Эллен I changed my name to the German version, LOL.
 
As most dialects or regions don't.
Back to my question,
Do anyone know why Americans says "bill" instead of "note" when most of the world says "note" and officially speaking they are a "note"?
Or have a idea why?
 
@MathCubes Why do you park in the driveway but drive on the parkway?
Why do people say 'literally' for literally 'not-literally'?
 
@Mitc
 
6:27 PM
@Færd Farsi lost 'mb' or has lots of 'mb'
 
@Mitch I want some historically background.
@Mitch A) I don't say that, B) I don't use that
 
@MathCubes You can click on the down arrow to the left to reply to a particular message (so we know what you're referring to)
 
"drive" means to move, so a driveway is a private street on a farm or a large property that connects your buildings.

Parkway, is any highway that goes though any forested area.
You have a right to use your private street no matter how short to park on it
 
@MathCubes What variety of English do you speak natively?
 
@Mitch Mixed. Grow up and live in the States. So... But I do read and use many phases that aren't in American English.
And also, what the heck is American English? As there are so many dialects... I think no one actually speaks the standard in nonformal settings.
 
6:32 PM
@MathCubes What part of the US may I ask?
 
The city have their own dialect, and in the city there are sub dialects for different cultures. African American English is way different than the rest and it's different than the city and rural.

The north have their own dialect, and the south has their own dialect.
@Mitch I know this isn't going to be much help as there are so many dialects here, but St. Louis.
 
The difference in dialects between Maine and Atlanta is less than the difference between High Holborn and Tottenham Court Rd
(that's funny because they intersect)
 
Heck, one of my former High school teacher that just retired used to speak Missouri France to her family.
 
@Mitch Typo. Lots. Eg qolombe (~chunk), shambe (Saturday), dombe (fat), etc.
 
@MathCubes That is true, the main dialect difference within the US is GenAmE and AAE
 
6:36 PM
Sadly, Missouri France will be dead soon. No High school wanted to teach it. My former teacher got in trouble for helping her students in non standardize France.
Thus, confusing them
 
@Færd Oh wow. so written 'shanbe' is usually converted to 'shambe' (which is natural of course)
 
But I don't know France to began with to compare them.
@Mitch Heck when I go to my state capital to take a test, the people there and I have difficultly understanding each other. It's merely like a 125 miles/200 km away.
 
@Mitch No, I transliterated the pronunciation. It's written shanbe alright.
But nobody pronounces it like that.
mb rolls off the tongue much more easily, as a Farsi speaker at least.
 
@Færd yeah, 'nb' isn't natural, but everything is so literal as a beginner
 
Uh-huh
 
6:40 PM
A lot of people in the rural settings says 'Missourah' for 'Missouri'
But officially its "Missouri"
 
@MathCubes You call the French that is spoken in Missouri 'Missouri France'?
 
Yes
 
That is a different language.
 
Its a dialect of France like Quebec France.
 
I've never heard of that
Where is it spoken? Ozarks?
 
6:41 PM
Around St. Louis
 
Are they culturally/ethnically French from colonial times?
 
No, It just stuck in the family.
My high school teacher, who spoke it, said it was France.
 
I'm not sure what that means.
Just one family?
 
So... But I know she disagree alot with the official France that the France teacher taught.
 
But when did that family pick up French? From their ancestors living in Missouri who back nin colonial times were immigrants from France?
@MathCubes France or French?
 
6:44 PM
I didn't even realize that there is a different spelling
The lanague
French, I guess
@Mitch Thanks for correcting me on that
 
@MathCubes Yeah, if you refer to the language as 'France' it's really confusing.
 
I thought it was the same spelling.
 
Also European English refers to the English that English colonizers from England speak in their territories around Europe, not what The Germans, French, Swedes, etc speak to each other at international conferences.
@MathCubes 'France' is pronounced by most English speakers as /fræns/ and 'French' as /frentʃ/
 
@Mitch Also, alot of Younger Europeans, just view them shelf as "European" not pe se "German" "Spanish", etc...
 
or in words, the vowels are different, and the last sound is an alveolar fricative in France, and a palatal affricate in French
 
6:48 PM
@Mitch note
 
I wounder is "bill" related from 'fræns'
LOL
And the German base is 'note'
 
There are 0 occurrences of "five pound bill" in Google ngrams, but many "five pound note"
 
@MathCubes There's a big mix of that. some people think of themselves as European, some of their country, some of a sub area (eg Catalans). I'm sure there's a poll somewhere. And I bet the Brits are really problematic nowadays.
@MattE.Эллен Note what?
 
True
 
@Kaspar nice. Mixing it up!
 
6:50 PM
haha. If you had said bill I would have done something for that too.
 
That would actually make sense, on how much more influence French has on the English spoken in North America.
Maybe 'note' is from German, and 'bill' is from French
Thoughts?
 
What did etymonline say? I tend to trust that
 
Oxford Dictionaries says note is from old French note, which is from Latin nota, to make note
 
Actually, the influence of Colonial French on Pre-AmE and AmE... I'm having a hard time imagining it is more than continental French has had on post 1800 BrE
 
6:56 PM
Humm
 
Basically, when money was new, a 5 pound note was a note that the bank had 5lb of your gold
 
Courgette, Aubergine are ...
two girls in the Pirates of Penzance?
@MattE.Эллен Silver
 
Vegetables! You colonial buffoon!
 
The Spanish had all the gold
Which is now in Indian banks
 
@Mitch oh, yeah, sterling
 
6:58 PM
which I've gathered from captions to graphs from the Economist posted on Twitter and then half fortgotten
I'm hammer starring my own shit
 
@Mitch Also, the French traded with the Native Americans, and fought in the war of independence.
 
because I'm hot
I should take off this big overcoat
and one of the sweaters
 
@Mitch Modabuse!
Oh, you're not a mod
 
@MattE.Эллен Buffoon is what I think you Britishers call meringue? So thank you!
 
7:00 PM
@MattE.Эллен That makes it even worse
I don't even have the right to be corrupt
aspirations to corruption
"When I grow up..."
 
Next mod election...
 
ooh... that's a neat effect.
 
Whenever that is
What's a nice effect?
 
You can't star your own msg but you if you pin something and then unpin it it becaome starred
 
Oh, yeah 😁
 
7:02 PM
@MattE.Эллен God forbid.
I mean that literally.
 
Maybe we need new mods. I'm clearly making a mess everywhere!
But I guess all the other mods are doing fine. I've not heard one of them asking for new blood
 
I talked to one of the leprechauns, and they asked God, and He said the faeries wouldn't let him.
@MattE.Эллен tchrist hasn't been his chipper self lately.
@MattE.Эллен And now I can't try to repin it, it says a mod had already 'cleared' it
probably those goddam faeries again
God just says 'those damn fairies'
a lot
they have a lot of HR problems
@Kaspar In French, it's Gaspard
 
Brexit news is chaos.
 
LOL
 
I will be holding my breath to see what happens next week.
 
7:18 PM
I hope there will be a hard Brexit for the laughs.
 
7:32 PM
@Mitch I don't think that's site related
 
 
4 hours later…
11:55 PM
@Mitch Careful, you might get flagged!
 

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