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12:01 AM
@RegDwigнt Quite silly indeed.
shakes heads
 
 
2 hours later…
1:44 AM
@RegDwigнt I like to think I know a thing or two about how to use Musescore properly. :D
I know the difference between a D sharp and an E flat, and I know when to tie a dotted eighth to a sixteenth instead of plopping a quarter in.
 
2:37 AM
@M.A.R. and @Færd how are things?
Are the protests as big as some here say they are?
 
2:58 AM
@Cerberus I thought they 'turned off' the Internet there yesterday?
 
@Mitch Yes.
 
Maybe that's what the protests are really about now.
Gas prices may affect the economy and cause unrest but NO INTERNET AND I'LL GO OUT OF MY MIND.
 
 
4 hours later…
6:33 AM
@Mitch I know!
That probably didn't make people any happier.
I think it was many about oil, though, not gas.
 
 
2 hours later…
8:33 AM
@Cerberus perhaps Mitch meant gas in the American sense
i.e. petrel
 
 
1 hour later…
10:00 AM
@TerranSwett well, that instantly puts you in the top 1% of all people on MuseScore. But that's my whole point. It really should not.
It's like if I said "I like to think I know how to use English properly: I know the difference between cat and car", and you'd give me a PhD in English for that.
Knowing the difference between a song and a dance should not be regarded as any kind of achievement. Yet on MuseScore it's the rarest achievement of them all.
 
10:16 AM
@Mitch It's been a week
@Cerberus I've heard there were protests five or six days ago but there was none after that, or rather since they shut down the internet.
The news are not new.
The news are old.
The olds are new
Old to new is like mattress to what
 
 
4 hours later…
2:07 PM
You know what I like? Redundant phrasalisation of verbs.
Like "exit out" and "reply back."
 
2:19 PM
@TerranSwett or 'reiterate'
@Gigili It's been a week since the internet was out? Or It's been a really interesting week?
Also, I'm guessing the internet is back on for you?
@MattE.Эллен Correct. I didn't mean it in the cattle flatulence sense.
I forgot, what does 'gas' mean in the British sense?
@Cerberus In all fairness, you have the benefit of seeing the situation from the outside after the fact.
Also, none of those suggestions would work in that cat's situation.
In addition, the styrofoam cup is too light to be sure it would come off by shaking, even though it fortunately does.
Also, why aren't you telling your cats to stay off of tables?
Also that cat is dumb because there's nothing in the cup.
 
3:25 PM
@Mitch methane, usually. gas for cooking on a hob
so called "natural gas"
 
3:54 PM
@MattE.Эллен Fürzevergnügen
 
nothing more natural!
 
 
4 hours later…
7:59 PM
This guy is kinda judgy.
Also, no American would ever use the term 'American peasant'.
Someone check COCA for me.
 
8:24 PM
english.stackexchange.com/a/518848/19334 - The weird thing about the word "drawer" is that the two pronunciations are /dɹɔɹ/ and /dɹɔ.ɹ/, but the vowel sounds totally different anyway—in my part of the peninsula, at least.
I used to wonder why "Lawrence" is pronounced like "Lorence" and "lawyer" is pronounced like "loyer."
It's the damn Northern Cities Vowel Shift. Our /ɔː/ phoneme shifted from [ɔː] to [ɑː], but not before /r/ and /j/.
 
9:07 PM
not exactly "inspirational" for students
 
9:24 PM
@Mitch Beides?
@Mitch Yes, only for me. I am awesome like that.
 
9:52 PM
That reminds me of the best ever opening sentence of a Stack Exchange question.
Somebody posted a question about the interest rate they can expect to get by lending cash to financial institutions.
The question began: "I have a dollar that I won't be needing tonight."
3
 
lol
 
@Robusto mighty Christ, Brahms' German Requiem is a gem. I never knew.
3
I particularly loved the first two movements, and the last two.
Everything is in there. From Mozart to Shostakovich. Whatever style you like, it's all in there somehow.
And the fortissimo tutti just blew my socks off. Goosebumps for minutes on end.
A full-sized orchestra (four horns, six basses, eight celli, timpani, that kind of thing) with two harps and a church organ. And then 80 singers singing their hearts out against that kind of backdrop. Fucking amazing.
 
link please
 
It was a live concert in my town.
I forgot to record it, sorry.
 
10:00 PM
But I'm sure there's five hundred renderings of it on YouTube.
It's just that I've not watched them all yet, or any of them. So I can't recommend a particular one.
Give me a week.
 
Also, no matter your speaker setup, YouTube just isn't quite up to the task of getting across the feeling you have surrounded by 180 people making music all at once.
You get a chance to see it live, by all means go.
 
will do
 
German Requiem by Brahms. The amuse-gueule was also by Brahms, one of his sacred motets a capella.
And now I need a vodka. Got five hours of choir singing myself tomorrow. But it's just the mass for the Sunday.
 
cya, pal
 
10:05 PM
Ludwigskirche in Old Saarbrücken, Germany, is a Lutheran baroque-style church. It is the symbol of the city and is considered to be one of the most important Protestant churches in Germany, along with the Dresden Frauenkirche and the St. Michael's Church, Hamburg. == History == Ludwigskirche and the surrounding Ludwigsplatz (Ludwig's Square) were designed as a "complete work of art", in the sense of a baroque place royale, by Friedrich Joachim Stengel on the commission of Prince William Henry. Construction was begun in 1762. After the death of William Henry in 1768, work on it was stopped due...
Not too shabby a venue, though.
TTYL.
 
10:33 PM
@RegDwigнt Nice. Unlike Tchaikovsky, I've always liked Brahms.
A Very German Requiem, that.
@Mitch You, sir, are an American peasant. There, I said it.
 
10:46 PM
BTW, @Reg, people always say Brahms inherited Beethoven's mantle. In part I can see that, but it seems maybe too glib. Certainly he inherited things from Ludwig van, but so did practically every composer in the 19th century. Well, the German ones anyway.
 

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