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5:08 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Few unique characters in answer (87): When did the colloquial "bro" come into use? by user364848 on english.SE
 
5:47 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Bad keyword in body, bad keyword in title, bad keyword in username, blacklisted website in body, potentially bad ns for domain in body, +2 more (486): Testo Ultra - Does it Help You Make The Extra Mile In The Bedroom? by Testo Ultra on english.SE
 
 
9 hours later…
3:06 PM
Is there a word for the length of the period of employment? Ie, the number of the years you've worked somewhere?
The legal term in Farsi translates as record or history, which don't work in English.
 
3:36 PM
> met betrekking tot loopbaan "(period / length of) service, term of
office"
dienstjaren "seniority"
@Færd This is what my dictionary suggests.
 
@Cerberus Thank you.
 
In other words, there is no single word.
 
But those terms do sound familiar.
And seem to be correct.
 
Perhaps if you provided more context people could suggest a good way to say it, which may or may not involve those phrases.
"Service" and "term of office" suggest a public function to me.
 
True. Maybe they don't work for a worker who does manual labor.
Or for a janitor.
 
3:39 PM
Period of employment would.
Or duration.
 
Uh-huh
 
nods
 
nods
 
Term of employment suggests a predetermined period of time.
(To be distinguished from terms.)
 
Right.
 
3:57 PM
Term of service or term of employment sound OK for non-governmental positions.
length of service is OK too
 
@Mitch Even for a janitor who was indefinitely employed (until retired)?
 
Yes. It sounds a little formal, and a janitor doesn't seem formal, but if it's a legal document I think it works.
Informally 'how long you worked there'
 
Okay. Thanks.
 
I'm checking Linkedin to see how they label it.
haha...they just display it. When they ask you about that length of time they say: "I am currently working in this role..." and you choose dates.
So they avoid a term altogether.
 
4:18 PM
@Mitch Shouldn't that sentence be in the perfect to denote duration?
> I have been working in this capacity for/since ...
> Previously, I worked in that other role for ...
 
@Færd oops...wrong string. that is the label for the checkbox to say what your current employment is. My mistake.
 
4:34 PM
@Mitch Np. You've got a fabulous joke on the starboard that more than makes up.
Here's another one:
> I saw a guy at Starbucks today.
No iPhone.
No tablet.
No laptop.
He just sat there.
Drinking coffee.
Like a Psychopath.
 
 
2 hours later…
6:18 PM
@Færd in fact, LinkedIn avoids a label entirely. There's just 'Start Date' and 'End Date'.
 
 
2 hours later…
8:04 PM
Huh. Today I discovered sinister is latin for 'left'.
Right being dexter.
Who calls their children 'right'?
 
@Mitch So maybe there ain't one single universal term for it, as pointed before.
@marcellothearcane Gauche parents?
 
9:05 PM
@marcellothearcane Correct.
@Færd I think you're right.
 
9:36 PM
@marcellothearcane gauche is French for left while we're on the subject. Sinister and gauche have a connotation for evil because of the salute and handshake being done with the right hand to demonstrate the lack of a weapon. Holding a weapon in your left hand being considered evil ....
At least that's just one theory. There are many others.
38
Q: How did "sinister", the Latin word for "left-handed", get its current meaning?

DanielSinister is the Latin word for left-handed. What evolution of meaning turned left-handed into evil and threatening?

 
 
1 hour later…
10:47 PM
@Cerberus Adroitly pointed.
 
@Færd Hmm is droit from dexter or directus?
Probably the former.
> This is from Old French à "to" (see ad-) + droit, dreit "right," from Medieval Latin directum (contracted drictum) "right, justice, law,"...
Hmm, no seems to be the latter.
 
there's also "adroit"
oops, snipered again
 
11:35 PM
Faerd is such a fast sniper!
 
yup
 

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