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12:13 AM
back home. Read this from Wikipedia "If a Minkowski spacetime contains a compact region Ω, and if the topology of Ω is of the form Ω ~ R × Σ, where Σ is a three-manifold of the nontrivial topology, whose boundary has topology of the form ∂Σ ~ S2, and if, furthermore, the hypersurfaces Σ are all spacelike, then the region Ω contains a quasipermanent intrauniverse wormhole."
Did not even flinch
I would have been trembling 7 years ago
Good times. Fun words!
At any rate going to just chill out and do my thing
signing off for a week or so to work on some very very very very simple baby trivial easy high school level stuff appropriate for somebody like me :)
 
 
1 hour later…
1:44 AM
@NovaliumCompany Someone else. He's been here for years but just came back from a one-year ban
 
vzn
2:06 AM
@skullpetrol seems like youve been a stranger too, whatvya been up to anyway?
 
 
2 hours later…
vzn
3:48 AM
more circumstantial evidence for spacetime fluid-fabric, from LHC o_O
@Secret ps so great at least 1 person here knows/ immerses in Ideas Mix™... maybe something )( to do with all your dream journaling :)
something else rather eyepopping for anyone/ everyone carrying crushing student loan debt... $40M gift from billionaire...
 
Fil
4:06 AM
I have an question regarding Stack overflow...
a question
 
@Fil Well stackoverflow is a different site, but you can ask
 
Fil
when I try to write a code in a code area, there is always a message push CTRL^K or do something, I forgot what... and I can not do anything to post my code no matter how I try
so I can not make any advance in Stack Overflow
 
@Fil ctrl-K just formats text with four spaces to the left of it. e.g.
Hmm, I can't get this to render here in the chat
But anyway, starting a line four spaces makes it render as code
This line isn't code
This line is code
There. That second line starts with four spaces and appears in code format.
ctrl-K just puts in the four spaces for you.
 
Fil
4:36 AM
Yes but nothing happens when I separate code 4 times...
same message again
 
@Fil Try it here. Type a line starting with four spaces and see if it formats as code.
 
Fil
4:56 AM
wait...
#include <iostream.h>
int main()
{
int i, j = 3;
 
That isn't working. It should look like:
#include <iostream.h>
int main()
{
  int i, j = 3;
Ah! :-)
 
Fil
theres more
there's
cout << "i = " << i << endl
       <<"j = " << j << endl;
return 0;
}
and is this c++ builder or what?
And every time I write this code this message appear and I can not post it
(I 've forgot a line of code but this doesn't really matter
)
 
Sid
5:12 AM
Game of Thrones finally ends.. :(
 
@vzn now that's a nice tax write off
 
 
2 hours later…
7:38 AM
@JohnRennie you know c programing too?
 
@Akash.B yes
 
Great
 
Most physicists know how to program because it's used so much in physics
 
I also know programing
Like to check whether palindrome, prime etc
 
In C?
 
7:41 AM
We have an IT syllabus for studying
 
It's a very valuable skill to have. And I have to say I enjoy programming.
 
Sometimes it aches my head if I didn't get it
@JohnRennie how it is useful for physics?
 
@Akash.B yes, programming does that :-)
@Akash.B in most big experiments these days the data analysis is done using computers. LIGO and the LHC couldn't work without huge computer programs to analyse their data.
 
@JohnRennie okay
 
morgen
 
8:10 AM
@Slereah Good Morning sir...
 
I have yet to be knighted
A knave I am
a scoundrel
 
@Slereah very deep sir, very poetic
 
8:42 AM
hey
So black holes are basically masses that are compressed so much that till a certain radius from them the gravitational force is enough to not even let light out right?
so I have 2 widely differing questions here
 
very roughly yes
 
1) Photons don't have mass then how can they be affected by gravity?
 
In general relativity objects aren't affected because they have mass
 
whether you consider wave nature or particle nature of light
 
gravity just changes what a straight line looks like
 
8:44 AM
yeah, it curves space time right
 
10
Q: How can gravity affect light?

math and mountainsI understand that a black hole bends the fabric of space time to a point that no object can escape. I understand that light travels in a straight line along spacetime unless distorted by gravity. If spacetime is being curved by gravity then light should follow that bend in spacetime. In Newton...

 
so general relativity doesn't use the formula for gravitational force..
ok, i didnt google that question sorry
but this next question i did google
2) People say black holes have infinite density. Is that really true?
density*
 
Well
if you consider the simplest black hole
And take any volume around its center
The mass remains the same
 
theres a popular saying that "if you compress earth into the size of a golf ball it will become a black hole". But a golf ball has volume and hence not infinite density?
 
That's because, past a certain size, an object will become subject to gravitational forces so intense that it will not stop collapsing
If you compress the earth to the size of a golf ball, it will keep on collapsing
until that point of infinite density
 
8:49 AM
ahh alright
but what if all the elementary particles are literally touching each other?
i dont think it can go to a volume below that..
 
Well if you want to consider quantum mechanics for the collapse
things are going to get a whole lot more complicated
This is all for classical general relativity
 
oh
so it just keeps collapsing to a singularity?
then what about the black hole they photographed just now
 
what about it
 
they say its event horizon occupies as much of a cross section as a solar system
 
Sure
 
8:53 AM
so the actual black hole is infinitely small?
 
The event horizon isn't composed of matter though
 
and only its event horizon is that big?
 
Well real black holes are a whole lot more complicated than what we're discussing, but roughly this is true, yes
 
so the volume of all black holes in the universe is equal and only their masses differ which causes the difference in the size of their event horizon
 
Really the situation isn't that much different from classical gravity when you consider the case of a point mass
A point mass is infinitely dense
 
8:55 AM
yes
 
but its gravitational effects are felt at a distance
 
yeah..
 
the event horizon is just a distance at which the behaviour changes
 
so what i said is true?
 
Yes, the mass and the volume/area/radius of the event horizon are related
 
8:56 AM
ahh
alright i get it
and regarding the "light escaping the black hole", im still not quite clear even after reading that answer
 
I would suggest learning about GR in details before worrying too much about what happens in a black hole
otherwise it's not gonna be terribly easy
things get very weird
 
oh ok
im almost about to start college
i will be taking computer science and engineering for bachelors
and do something astronomy related in masters
 
Well, to repeat what was previously said here
user image
2
Not gonna need a whole lot of GR for engineering!
 
i actually wanna go into the field of space exploration but most scientists need to have an in depth knowledge of computers for efficiency so thats why im doing that in bachelors
do you think that the correct path?
 
Depends what you mean by space exploration
Should probably ask an expert in whatever you want to do the correct path
 
9:01 AM
hmm ya probably
 
although whatever path you take for space exploration, odds of requiring GR are low
 
space exploration as in space travel
 
not a whole lot of exploring black holes
 
nah i still wanna study GR someday
any idea on if i can just do it from the internet myself?
 
Well there's no lack of ressources certainly
But you'd need to be fairly motivated
Also depends what do you mean by GR
GR covers a lot of ground
I've been looking at GR stuff for over ten years and I still find weird stuff I've never heard of before
 
9:03 AM
oh
just the basics i guess
 
Then sure
Basic GR isn't that complicated
 
dont wanna become a full fledged theoritical physicist
although it would be cool
but i have interest in the practical side too
so i want a bit of both
which is why i think engineering would be nice
 
@MartianCactus Good question. However, classical GR is agnostic regarding the composition of matter. It doesn't know anything about fundamental particles, or even atoms. To properly address what happens to matter near the core of a black hole we need a theory of quantum gravity.
 
oh so the theory of everything basically
yeah classical GR doesnt work when you consider quantum pphysics right
and vice versa
 
Things get complicated
 
9:08 AM
OTOH, we can't observe what goes on inside the event horizon, so even if we did have a quantum gravity theory, we wouldn't be able to directly verify its predictions about black hole cores.
Sometimes people use a combination of QM & GR to predict stuff, like Hawking radiation, but that doesn't have a solid theoretical basis, so Hawking radiation may turn out to be a fiction.
Ben Crowell wrote a great answer about black hole singularities in classical GR. My favourite line is: "A singularity in GR is like a piece that has been cut out of the manifold. It's not a point or point-set at all."
 
Hawking radiation does seem to appear in... pretty much every version of quantum gravity I can think of
It is likely to be correct
 
@MartianCactus Most of the time, that's no big deal, since GR gives roughly the same predictions as Newtonian physics, unless the gravity is extreme, which normally requires big objects with huge mass. And QM is only needed to explain the behaviour of tiny structures. So most of the time, they don't overlap. But when they do overlap, they don't play nicely together.
 
Well they're not that bad either
as long as the backreaction is small it works out okay
 
@Slereah Sure, but at this stage we don't have a solid foundation for it. And it will always be extremely difficult to observe, except for very small BHs.
 
Semiclassical gravity is generally considered to be fine as long as $$\langle T_{\mu\nu}(p) T_{\rho\sigma}(q) \rangle \approx \langle T_{\mu\nu}(p)\rangle \langle T_{\rho\sigma}(q) \rangle$$
 
9:23 AM
semiclassical?
oh nvm
so GR is and update of classical mechanics
in a way
and quantum physics is a completely different subject in it
right?
 
@MartianCactus We can combine QM with SR, without problems. And GR says that if you zoom in close enough to a chunk of curved spacetime it looks flat, so you can use SR on it. That strategy is mostly fine, unless your chunk of spacetime is particularly gnarly.
@MartianCactus Yep. GR is considered a classical theory, because it doesn't have any quantum stuff.
 
whats sr
 
@MartianCactus Special Relativity
 
oh
idk the difference im sr and gr
 
@MartianCactus SR is relativity on flat spacetime, without gravity. The mathematics is pretty simple. GR tells us how to do relativity with gravity. The maths gets a bit tricky. ;)
 
9:38 AM
To be fair the math also gets tricky in SR
 
@Slereah Well, I guess it can get messy, eg doing a completely general Lorentz transformation. But basic SR requires nothing more than high school algebra, although a bit of calculus can be handy.
 
You can do special relativity with manifolds
things can get messy for general coordinate transformations
For accelerated observers and rotating observers
Also doing frame transport and that kind of nonsense
 
Can anyone recommend me an introduction book to economics? That's easy to understand with practical examples and basic terminology?
 
Maybe not the best channel to ask for such a thing
if we understood economics odds are good we wouldn't have gone after a physics degree
7
 
xD
you may not have understood economics but you did have the chance to learn it ;)
 
10:11 AM
I'm thinking of some sort of a mechanism to check if something underwater is alive. I thought of a laser first, but I don't think it'll work. What about some sort of a electric motor to send a stream of water and see if it'll move?
What about speaker underwater :D?
I'm building a costume to help me explore the sea during summer.
Also what are some good gloves for underwater that I can hook up electronics to them?
 
I have only had small touch with economics when in junior high school, feeling it somewhat boring.
 
10:28 AM
What is the yellowish led thingy called here:
What should I say to the hardware owner if I want to buy only such yellow "flat" led?
(and not the bulb type of electronics led)
 
 
2 hours later…
12:21 PM
Economics is a lot of stochastic calculus
I hope u enjoy Markov processes
 
1:41 PM
\o @Semiclassical
 
TIL Bob Dylan went to the university of Minnesota
 
yeah
there's also a Fourth St which runs nearby to the university (like really nearby) which some people take to be the origin of "Positively 4th Street". (though I've seen it credibly argued that it's actually about 4th St in NYC)
 
cool
 
1:58 PM
@skillpatrol always wanted to ask..are you the user of the IDs @skullpetrol and @skullpatrol too?
good going
okay you wanna keep the others guessing
:)
 
 
1 hour later…
3:14 PM
@SDFG He has dozen other alts
 
hmm
Well, if that's common knowledge, I don't know why he removed his response :P
 
@vzn Actually I did idea mixing stuff since I go to primary school lol
@vzn I am confused by how you get this interpretidon. Reading the paper, all I see is entanglement. There's no discussion on how this is connected to the nature of spacetime?
 
vzn
3:32 PM
@Secret "entanglement" is the big buzzword across different/ crosscutting physics fields/ compartments right now. a recent Swingle survey links entanglement to spacetime fabric, this is from the AdS/CFT crowd. physicists are starting to approach the spacetime fabric idea from multiple directions, slowly converging/ "triangulating" on spacetime fluid fabric. some of this is related to QM + GR unification ideas.
 
right
 
vzn
@Secret old zen expr: in the beginners mind (shoshin) there are many possibiilities, in the experts only a few...
 
AI creativity is getting more interesting less so in how close AI can replicate creativity, but in helping humans to discover blind spots in their thinking patterns
 
vzn
@Secret here a key buzzword is curiosity...
 
Currently I have a personal investigation that basically trying to get curiosity itself on autopilot
There's a kind of table that lists out the 4 types of unknown we are aware of
(here shows where it is used in the national defense context in some public seminar)
Based on the various groups spanning from science to politics I have interacted with in the past 8 years, the following is what is known so far:
A recent philosophy discussion about 21st century existentialism lead to the suggestions that "compound unknowables" may exists, despite it is unknowable that it is unprovable
In addition, science discovery tend to convert unknown unknowns into knowns and known known and known unknowns tend to interconvert
While blind spots is well known for being an unknown known, Emilo's questions highlight that folklore and common sense is also an unknown known
And the discussion on the nature of creativity and freewill in philosophy, combined with AI creativity discussions, lead to the possibility that witnessing a creative act can convert an unknown known into a known by showing us what lies outside what we aware
Basically, the limit of creativity is
> We don't aware that X exists
thus if this barrier can be overcame, then transcending creativity may be possible
 
4:12 PM
@ACuriousMind Actually there's a steam sale on thursday
did you play mankind divided?
I finally played HR and it was great
 
@RyanUnger Not yet, it renders everything with weird-looking stripes on my machine and I couldn't figure out why
 
@ACuriousMind did you upgrade your gpu from the 660?
 
The pitfalls of Linux gaming :P
 
oh dear god.
 
@RyanUnger No, I think the next time I "upgrade" I will replace the entire machine.
After the RAM upgrade killed the Windows installation for reasons I still don't understand I'm not doing that again :P
 
4:17 PM
@ACuriousMind yeah wait for the R9 series to come out
@ACuriousMind oh I remember that
you must have hit a singularity or something
ACM's incompleteness theorem
 
the other day @bolbteppa posted some notes about susy/sugra/AdS/CFT. I'm interested in the subject but at a first look I can't really gauge the level (pun intended). Do you reckon someone who's had one GR and one QFT course can work through them or am I a fool for even thinking about it?
 
it's probably better to learn something tried and true rather than speculative physics
such as nonlinear hyperbolic PDE
 
@user2723984 Depends on the kind of QFT course and your pain tolerance/willingness to go on wild goose chases for concepts you don't yet understand :P
 
@ACuriousMind so did you watch the shitshow yesterday
 
@ACuriousMind we did QFT without the path integral formalism unfortunately. Standard intro stuff, mostly QED up to one loop renormalization
 
4:22 PM
@RyanUnger I haven't watched the last two seasons of GoT, and judging from the internet's response at large, I don't regret that decision!
 
@RyanUnger that sounds awful
 
@user2723984 QFT? I agree
 
@user2723984 I haven't looked at bolbteppa's notes, but the path integral formalism is likely something that would be of broader usefulness anyway
 
@ACuriousMind you're probably right, I'll look into that first as if I understand correctly it has applications in other fields too. It's not that I want to work on HEP anyway, just wanted to take a peek as it sounds very interesting.
 
4:52 PM
@Slereah Well this is a thing
Econophysics is an interdisciplinary research field, applying theories and methods originally developed by physicists in order to solve problems in economics, usually those including uncertainty or stochastic processes and nonlinear dynamics. Some of its application to the study of financial markets has also been termed statistical finance referring to its roots in statistical physics. Econophysics is closely related to social physics. == History == Physicists' interest in the social sciences is not new; Daniel Bernoulli, as an example, was the originator of utility-based preferences. One of the...
 
5:40 PM
I got banned in GTA 5 for cheating :P
I spent 60$ on the acc...
 
Maybe you shouldn't have cheated?
6
 
6:07 PM
What is the best citation for this concept? vixra.org/pdf/1905.0178v1.pdf
 
The “vixra contains a lot of crap” concept?
 
yeah :D
 
Or that E=md^2/t concept?
 
but also, E=mc^2 derived from E=wt, who dunnit first? I'm sure this is before Newton.
Though this equation is always attributed to Einstein who is after Newton.
 
Except that energy is power * time
Work is just a form of energy
Same units.
 
6:14 PM
oh right, wow, vixra is bad for health. Can I get a reference textbook again? I think I need to go back to school.
 
At best, you’ve got P=Fv and therefore E = Pt = F(vt)=Fd = work done by that force
 
That ought to be in any freshman physics text, e.g. Halliday & Walker
 
ah, I just remembered I used Halliday and Resnick for something. Solving Irodov. This was many years ago.
 
6:29 PM
@Semiclassical thanks!
I'll just cite the text then.
 
 
3 hours later…
9:28 PM
@Slereah sounds to me like "if we understood how to summon demons we wouldn't have gone for magic theory"
 
@ACuriousMind Krasnikov's book has a part about demons
 
GR = GeneRal demonology
 
I like how he used little dragons and also a mystical rune to label that curve
Pretty sure Krasnikov is a wizard
 
Demons aren't rare in physics
 
9:38 PM
@Slereah Eth is not a mystic rune
It's even the standard symbol for the voiced English "th"!
 
Not really a standard physics symbol
But Krasnikov is insane
He even uses a thorn in his notation
 
> demons of this kind are called jinns in [127]
...so I must know, what is [127]?
 
Yes, it is quite a mystical book
 
...also, what are efreets, marids and daos in this context?
 
though apparently it first appeared here
one thing I want to do for my site is a halloween post
It will be about jiins, demons, ghosts and phantoms
though so far physics doesn't have any witches or goblins
 
9:52 PM
Time to invent your legacy: The Lereah goblin.
 
The goblin singularity
Although I guess that before you introduce a silly notation, you need some creds
Can't make your first paper about the lich integral
Hm, what else is spooky in physics
there are skeleton diagrams
 
10:27 PM
@Slereah ghosts
 
Already said ghosts
as they are the most well known of spooky phenomenon
 
ah, missed it
what else is spooky in physics if not action at a distance
 
10:41 PM
not a very good Halloween costume
 
requires some originality in the design for sure
 
It's just me with a very long stick
 
that's just regular action at a distance
 
Someone's gonna get poked by the stick
 
pokey action at a distance, just one letter to go for a brilliant if easily misunderstood costume
you could just wear a regular halloween costume and perform Bell experiments
 
11:44 PM
Get a giant letter S and dress it up like a ghost
then you'll have spooky action...then put it on the stick?
 

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