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2:19 AM
meta.japanese.stackexchange.com/ads/display/1421 shows that the Korean Language and Usage ad has had two clicks, so I think they're showing.
As far as I can tell they don't enter the rotation very often... mostly unrelated ads.
 
Oh, good! It was actually zero before.
 
2:34 AM
It would be nice if there was also a "Views" and/or "Unique Views" counter in addition to the "clicks" counter... would have the click-through ratio that way.
 
 
10 hours later…
12:51 PM
@DariusJahandarie Apparently the counter counts them when I clicked them there... (I just clicked to verify.) So I don't think any of these clicks are actually from them appearing as ads on the main page.
I also clicked your ad there to see if the link was working. Now it has 1 click, too, but not from it being shown as an ad on the main page.
 
1:06 PM
0
Q: Are the Community Ads working?

EarthliŋCurrently, we have two "live" ads, shown here: http://meta.japanese.stackexchange.com/ads/display/1421 I haven't actually seen them on the main page, but apparently the counter increases, when clicking the ad on the above page, too. I clicked the Korean Language proposal ad 6 times & the reso...

 
 
3 hours later…
4:13 PM
Ah, I see.
 
 
7 hours later…
10:52 PM
_piko_ and _pime_ are given in Shogakukan's 国語大辞典 as compounds of 日 + 子 and 日 + 女 respectively, explaining the 日 prefix as a kind of epithet:

(「日子」の意)男子の美称。
@broccoliforest (sorry, forgot to tag my initial reply above)
大辞林 gives the same derivations.
 
11:17 PM
I notice that 彦 and 姫 have different pitch patterns, which is a bit of a surprise to me. 彦 is given as either pitch 2 [hìkóꜜ] or pitch 0 [hìkó], while 姫 is given as pitch 1 [híꜜmè]. I presume this difference is caused by the different pitch patterns for the second morphemes, ko as pitch 0 and me as pitch 1?
@DariusJahandarie, thanks for the welcome. :D
@snailboat, continuing on from our discussion at japanese.stackexchange.com/questions/27818/… --
You'd written: Note that the 未然形 never appears on its own and has no meaning―what do passives, causatives, negatives, tentatives, honorifics, repetitives, etc. have in common semantically? Claiming the 未然形 exists doesn't really do anything useful aside from letting you analyze Japanese on kana boundaries.
The 未然形 (irrealis) and 已然形 (realis) both never appear on their own.
I recall seeing one description (possibly Frellesvig?) that the realis's historical 上代特殊仮名遣い could suggest that this verb form is actually a contraction of the 連用形 ending in -i + the a- in ある. However, I have never seen any similar analysis of the irrealis.
Semantically, it can be analyzed as indicating an expanded kind of imperfective.
Irrealis + る -- the action isn't concluded, and then る -- it completes on its own, 自発的に. Passive / mediopassive / intransitive.
Irrealis + す -- the action isn't concluded, and then す -- it is made to complete, 他動的に. Causative / transitive.
Irrealis + ぬ -- the action isn't concluded, and then ぬ -- ending with things still incomplete (or not even started). Negative.
I think I see a similar pattern even for ば conditionals, where -aba with the irrealis seems more speculative than -eba with the realis.
But maybe that's just me. :)
 
11:36 PM
The irrealis name makes sense for conditionals.
Just conditionals, though.
 
(gotta run for a bit, time for a meeting here IRL)
 
未然・已然 goes that far, but no further.
By the way, you might be interested in Frellesvig 2010 p.119
He's a historical linguist who does accept that the 未然形 exists
Although he grants that it didn't originally, and it only exists as a reanalysis of historically a-initial forms
There's some interesting discussion there
Vovin 2003 p.168 for some discussion of the idea that the 未然形 does not exist
Although it was hardly a new idea at that time
Modern analyses segment the 仮定形+ば separately too, by the way: it's taken as -(r)eba, where the parentheses indicate a morphophonological alternation (reba after a vowel, eba after a consonant)
 

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