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6:21 AM
A new tag was created by Burt. The tag-info is empty.
1
Q: Index shift in Taylor series of $\sin(x)$

BurtI saw the following index shift involving the Taylor Series for $\sin(x)$. $$\sin(x)=\sum^{\infty}_{n=1}(-1)^{n-1}\frac{x^{2n-1}}{(2n-1)!}=\sum^\infty_{n=0}(-1)^{n}\frac{x^{2n+1}}{(2n+1)!}$$ This second sum seems right to me, but the index shift seems funny. If I shifted the index down one - from...

A new tag was created by Jneven. The tag is now added to 14 question. The same user created also the tag-excerpt and the tag-wiki.
1
Q: Is this a Multinomial distribution?

The OneI find it hard to notice when do I have a Multinomial distribution and if its possible to "transform" problems into a Multinomial distribution problems. For example I have the following exercise: $15$ people come for a test $21$ quizzes has been printed $7$ quizzes are type A ...

1
Q: Is there a Continuous Multinomial Distribution??

LittleYUYUIn Multinomial Distribution, we have \begin{align} f(x_1,\ldots,x_k;n,p_1,\ldots,p_k) & {} = \Pr(X_1 = x_1\mbox{ and }\dots\mbox{ and }X_k = x_k) \\ \\ & {} = \begin{cases} { \displaystyle {n! \over x_1!\cdots x_k!}p_1^{x_1}\cdots p_k^{x_k}}, \quad & \mbox{when } \sum_{i=1}^k x_i=n \\ \\ 0 & ...

In probability theory, the multinomial distribution is a generalization of the binomial distribution. For example, it models the probability of counts of each side for rolling a k-sided dice n times. For n independent trials each of which leads to a success for exactly one of k categories, with each category having a given fixed success probability, the multinomial distribution gives the probability of any particular combination of numbers of successes for the various categories. When k is 2 and n is 1, the multinomial distribution is the Bernoulli distribution. When k is 2 and n is bigger than...
Queries which show also editors who added/removed the tag: data.stackexchange.com/math/query/1105163/… data.stackexchange.com/math/query/1038474/…
BTW on these two questions, the tag was added, removed and added again: math.stackexchange.com/posts/2504358/revisions math.stackexchange.com/posts/2734319/revisions
 
 
6 hours later…
12:21 PM
@XanderHenderson Well, I didn't think of that scenario before, so it's now necessary enough to discuss this on meta first.
 
 
2 hours later…
2:11 PM
The tag appeared and disappeared a few times in the past week. It was from this question: When does a graph have a circular orientation? It is deleted at the moment - it was deleted and undeleted a few times: math.stackexchange.com/posts/3500370/revisions
Queries which show also editors who added/removed the tag: data.stackexchange.com/math/query/1105163/… data.stackexchange.com/math/query/1038474/… (Of course, at the moment there are no results - the tag is only in that deleted question.)
 
 
4 hours later…
6:09 PM
A new tag was created by Secretly.
0
Q: Understanding a part of a proof.

SecretlyI was reading the answer of this question : Convergence of measure sequences bounded by a finite measure But I did not understand some parts in the proof of $\mu: \mathcal{A}\longrightarrow[0,\infty]$. First: I did not understand why the $\epsilon$ in the definition of the limit is the same...

 
@MartinSleziak That doesn't seem necessary... what is wrong with ?
 
6:27 PM
What is the difference between measure-theory and general-measure-theory? Why did you create the second tag? — Xander Henderson 15 mins ago
To me, the meaning of "general measure theory" isn't clear either.
I see that it was edited to . (Which does not sound better.)
0
Q: Understanding a part of the proof of $\mu: \mathcal{A}\longrightarrow[0,\infty]$.

SecretlyI was reading the answer of this question : Convergence of measure sequences bounded by a finite measure But I did not understand some parts in the proof of $\mu: \mathcal{A}\longrightarrow[0,\infty]$. First: I did not understand why the $\epsilon$ in the definition of the limit is the same...

 
@MartinSleziak I was just about to post that here. You're so fast!
 
 
4 hours later…
10:16 PM
There has been some discussion in the Math Mods' Office about the quality of the tag synonym $\to$ .
 

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