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12:07 AM
What’s the etymology of trama, tramae?
 
12:27 AM
> trāma, ae, f. [cf.: trans, trāmes].
Square brackets normally indicate cognation.
> trāmĕs, ĭtis, m. [akin to trans, and Gr. τέρμα, goal].
> trans, prep. with acc. [Sanscr. tar-, to put across; tiram, brink; Gr. τέρμα, goal; Lat. terminus, etc.]
 
Oh good, thanks. I always think of meta as goal in Latin.
 
Yes, but so what?
 
What's the gender of τέρμα in Greek?
Masculine, right?
 
Neuter.
 
But it's feminine in Latin. That's what I asked for.
 
12:31 AM
Almost all -ma words are neuter in Greek.
At least in Attic.
Because normally feminine -a is turned into -ê after m.
It will be different in Doric.
 
Oh, so like drama is neuter in Latin.
I was noticing the differing genders between drama and trama.
 
Yes.
So the -ma in trama cannot be from Greek.
 
Which is what I was trying to figure out. Spanish has la trama but el drama.
 
Which makes sense, because trama is not a translitteration of τέρμα.
Ah OK.
But I'm sure Spanish has messed up the Latin genders somewhat?
 
Not much.
It just doesn't have neuter.
 
12:34 AM
There you go.
> τέρμα, ατος, τό, end, boundary, chiefly poet.: I. goal round which horses and chariots had to turn at races
 
Normally it preserves them quite well, even when they don't make any sense, like la mano.
 
Right.
But that's a very common word.
 
So they don't forget it.
 
12:47 AM
Exactly.
Irregularity is most likely to appear or remain in the commonest words.
 

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