« first day (1599 days earlier)   

12:15 AM
@Cerberus That was "you two" not "two Kudos".
 
Ah, yes.
Oh, well.
Never miss a pedantic opportunity, not even an apparent one.
 
I guess when a pedant is wrong, he's a perdant.
 
ewe
 
Doe you not like?
 
I no hind.
Have a hart.
 
12:28 AM
Is there a word in English for the specific type of pun called a contrepèterie in French?
I don't think so, it's not a very common type.
Not in English anyway, it's very popular in French.
 
Does it have to be lewd?
 
No, it just tends to be.
Huh, apparently, it's called a spoonerism.
A spoonerism is an error in speech or deliberate play on words in which corresponding consonants, vowels, or morphemes are switched (see metathesis) between two words in a phrase. An example is saying "The Lord is a shoving leopard" instead of "The Lord is a loving shepherd." While spoonerisms are commonly heard as slips of the tongue resulting from unintentionally getting one's words in a tangle, they can also be used intentionally as a play on words. == Etymology == It is named after the Reverend William Archibald Spooner (1844–1930), Warden of New College, Oxford, who was notoriously prone to...
It finally occurred to me to check whether WP had a link to the equivalent English page.
 
ya visto
 
Look again
 
Gorsh.
 
crl
12:34 AM
centrepoterie
 
@crl ?
 
crl
@terdon juste une contrepètrie sur "contrepèterie"
 
Ah! Pas une orthographie alternative donc!
Those are horrible for a non-native to understand. I think I may have understood 3 after 4 years of living in France.
 
I do love checking out all the crooks and nannies.
 
crl
They (contrepeteries) are mostly vulgar, but funny anyway
 
12:40 AM
We’ll do the nativity test: crl, do you get my joke? :)
 
crl
1 min ago, by tchrist
I do love checking out all the crooks and nannies.
this ^?
 
Yep.
 
crl
No :(
 
@terdon See? :)
 
@tchrist Yup.
 
12:41 AM
Foos on the other shit now.
 
@crl nooks and crannies is an expression.
 
crl
Ah, well
 
@tchrist So I can get them, it's just that odd language that threw me off!
@crl Yes, you need to know the original idiom well enough to recognize it even when changed. That implies a certain level of mastery of the language.
Your English seems much better than my French and you still don't get those.
 
@crl I figured you probably knew crooks but perhaps not nannies — but that you wouldn’t immediately recognize the swapped starts of a common expression whose individual words are a bit uncommon, especially crannies.
 
crl
Yes, right
There are some invariant contrepeteries too: "Il fait beau et chaud"
 
12:46 AM
Dammit!
 
crl
hmm, I found it there, but now I'm thinking "cheau" isn't a valid word
 
I don't get it.
 
Show and tell. :)
 
@crl Yay! I got the first one!
Est-ce que tu es déjà arrivé à pied par la Chine?
Shier par la pine?
 
crl
As a graduate from "les Mines" this one is good too "École nationale supérieure des mines de Paris"
@terdon chier, yes
defecate :)
 
12:49 AM
@crl Yes it's the penis I didn't get at first.
It doesn't rhyme.
 
@terdon If at first you don’t succeed....
 
Or is Chine not replacing penis?
@tchrist I'd rather not try if it's all the shame to you.
 
Hey, I was being kind: notice I forgot to misspell succeed.
 
Oooh, too many options there.
@crl Salut Fred ?
Oh, and piné: une variante de pénis. Now I get the les Mines one.
 
crl
@terdon From the comment "Phalllus raide"
 
12:53 AM
Ugh
OK
 
crl
== Français == === Étymologie === (xiii e siècle) Origine incertaine [1] : peut-être du franc-comtois pine (« pigne, pomme de pin » ou « sifflet, flûte ») ; ou une variante de pénis. === Nom commun === pine /pin/ féminin (Argot) (Vulgaire) Sexe masculin, membre viril, pénis, verge, vit. Voilà Gautier tournant, à propos d’un mot jeté par nous sur le Faune de Munich, tournant sur le beau pur de la sculpture grecque, qu’il reconnaît aux testicules des statues. Et le voilà à nous décrire la pine grecque et comme l’ingénuité du phallus dont parle Aristophane. — (Frères Goncourt, Journal) Ne...
 
C'est trop drôle membre viril. Same expression exists in Spanish.
 
crl
à ne pas confondre avec épine
 
Shoot, you mean it’s not in English!?
 
crl
@tchrist they would have been swapped :p
 
12:57 AM
I’ll try to re-member. :)
 
@crl Bon, ça dépend de la largeur.
@tchrist Ouch.
 
It was not a great day on ELU. I don’t know if there was a single decent question.
 
crl
Oh just got it, I'm slow
 
Is there an equivalent to miembro viril in English actually?
 
1:00 AM
Oh
That was simple. I'd never seen that term.
@tchrist There was that nice one about words that describe all words including themselves.
 
autologous
 
Which is.
 
heterologous is for words that don't describe themselves
 
@Mitch Which isn’t.
 
autologous words: short, simple, sesquipedalian.
 
1:03 AM
curt
 
crl
the set of sets that don't include themselves
 
Short is one letter too long.
Any easy is better.
 
heterologous words: long, abecedarian, uh ... white uh pretty much all words.
 
White is good.
 
it's pretty white
 
1:04 AM
@Mitch Except heterologous.
 
Thanks, by the way, I didn't know either one.
 
so heterologous is neither auto- nor hetero-logous
I don't see what the scandal is.
 
So you’re saying it’s ambilogous?
 
nice!
 
@Mitch heterologous. Scandal, that is.
 
1:06 AM
neither-here-nor-thereologous
 
Pentasyllabic.
 
Cheating!
 
@tchrist not in BrE!
 
Recherché.
 
pentaslabic
 
1:07 AM
Which would make the USSR multislabic?
 
Hexasyllabically or heptasyllabically?
 
Scandal is too much, except for the outfits. Fabulous!
 
So, what's untrue? Auto or hetero?
 
Oh, maybe those should be in Latin.
 
@terdon in BrE
 
1:09 AM
Sexasyllabically or septasyllabically?
 
You called?
 
Mention sex and he appears!
 
@terdon words aren't true or false, they're descriptive.
 
Mention Latin.
 
I don’t know why I put a hex on those.
 
1:10 AM
@tchrist Use sex and the authorities might take notice.
 
@Mitch So, does that make true and untrue autologous or heterologous?
 
@Cerberus You just did.
 
Check.
Now mention something.
 
@terdon heterologous since they do not describe themselves
 
Mate.
 
1:10 AM
Something.
 
Is that a thing?
 
some of it
 
Sometimes
 
I’d like to try it someonce.
 
Hey, I already did. Why ape me?
Someonce is actually a much nicer word than sometime.
 
1:12 AM
Because of the buzz around you.
Isn’t it?
Labyrinthiform.
 
No hybrides, please.
Or is it hybres?
 
Not my fault. It’s in the OED.
 
@Cerberus The highlands and the islands
 
@tchrist autologous!
 
1:14 AM
Hybres is what I sought; hybrides are certain birds of prey.
@terdon Will no doubt know.
 
Bulo or stringisomething?
 
Possibly bubo.
 
I had gulo running through my brain.
 
I heard that falcons are actually perching birds. Was that here?
 
@Mitch Well, they are related to parrots.
 
1:18 AM
@Cerberus Oh, hybris, yes.
 
> In agreement with the split of Falconiformes and Accipitriformes, comparative genome analysis published in 2008 suggested that falcons are more closely related to the parrots and passerines than to other birds including the Accipitridae, so that the traditional Falconiformes are paraphyletic even if the Cathartidae are excluded.
> Indeed, a 2011 analysis of transposable element insertions shared between the genomes of falcons, passerines, and parrots, but not present in the genomes of other birds, confirmed that falcons are a sister group of the combined parrot/passerine group, together forming the clade Eufalconimorphae.
Eu.
Good birdies.
 
@terdon There are two words in Ancient Greek, one with plural hubreis, the other hubrides.
 
> New World vultures do not form a monophyletic clade with the superficially similar family of Old World vultures, but similarities between the two groups are due to convergent evolution.
 
@tchrist I thought all birds of prey were eagle related or owls. But I guess not.
 
crl
un vrai faucon, mais un faux condor
 
1:21 AM
@Mitch No.
@crl As it were, yes.
> New World vultures were traditionally placed in a family of their own in the Falconiformes. ... However, recent multi-locus DNA studies ... indicate that New World vultures are related to the other birds of prey, excluding the Falconidae which are distantly related to other raptors, and are not close to storks.
 
@crl un faux faucon, un vrai ... something
 
@Cerberus In modern Greek ύβρις is the raising yourself above the Gods one.
Hubris.
 
Apotheosis? :)
 
Metatheosis perhaps
 
1:23 AM
@terdon And the other one?
 
Only the Swedes make that masculine.
Volvo. :)
 
@terdon hybriviously
 
El condor pasa.
 
@Cerberus I've never heard of hybrides.
 
@terdon No name for a bird of prey like that?
 
1:28 AM
@Cerberus Are you sure hybrides is a thing?
 
Yes, or my statements would have been really weird, no?
 
Very like unto our Great Horned, the ones that were in the back yard a couple of weeks ago.
For some reason, the English call them eagle-owls. They are mighty it is true.
It was nearly 80 today. The house is hot upstairs.
 
@Cerberus OK, yes but we call that a μπούφος. Which also means stupid, doofus.
 
How strange!
Owls are known for their wisdom, not their sophomoronic wit.
Really quite comfortable.
 
1:43 AM
@terdon Hmm odd.
 
Kinda blustery though.
Every town should have its own National Center for Atmospheric Research. :)
 
@tchrist is there an idiomatic way of getting the output of a system call into a perl variable with an implicit chomp()?
For a one liner.
Ah!
 chomp ($foo=`cmd`)
Not quite implicit but shorter than what I had.
 
2:20 AM
@terdon Yup, that's the normal way.
 
 
8 hours later…
10:25 AM
@tchrist This will take some getting used to.
 

« first day (1599 days earlier)