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12:33 AM
@Cerberus Isn't all of Germany Eastern at least through Pentecost?
 
Hah, you probably know better.
 
Who ever dreamt that the Kingdom of Bunnies and Chicks would produce a Hitler?
 
12:56 AM
Well, he was Austrian, wasn't he?
 
The Easter Reich.
 
Heh I suppose so.
 
1:17 AM
very sleepy
how does a psychologist help you?
 
2:20 AM
@CowperKettle THhanks a lot for replying..Can you explain me the question slightly that I posted?
 
solving one's mental problems are harder than physical problems.
how can a psychologist help?
the same mental problems of different individuals are caused by different issues.
will psychologists analyze your issues and compose strategies to help solve your issues?
 
 
5 hours later…
7:51 AM
Word of the day: to fluff (to arouse a porn actor before filming)
> To get Lance Bronson hard, Chi Chi, in desperation, called Sharon Kane to come and fluff him on the set. People were always asking me how they could get a job as a fluffer.
 
 
1 hour later…
9:09 AM
From the Russian Information Agency, an official media.
> In case of an attempted offensive, the nominally existing state of Ukraine will be liquidated.
> Ukraine's offensive in the Donbass region will mean .. a de-facto refusal to maintain its territorial integrity.
> In this case, [...] Russia will act in view of its own sovereignty, without any thought of diplomacy.
After a couple of paragraphs that describe Ukraine as a Nazi state,
> The task of liquidating such a Nazi community will require not only the removal of the whole top tier of its authorities, but the cleansing of the nazified people from Nazi influence
> This is exactly the case of Ukraine, which has taken a large-scale Nazi oath through the superficially benign vector of "aspiring to join the Europe"
(this is an article published yesterday by an official Russian media, and it's very, very scary. I can't remember reading such militaristic stuff since the early days of May 2014)
> In view of the above, it would be wrong and impossible to view the sentiments of the wide Ukrainian populace as a manifestation of the so-called Stockholm Syndrtome, in which hostages turn sympathetic to the terrorists that have taken them hostage.
> In reality, what has taken place is the transition of the so-called hostages into the terrorist camp en masse, a phenomenon in which they cease to be hostages and become terrorists themselves.
Meaning: Ukrainian people are taken hostage by "Nazis" and we (Russia) cannot tolerate this and should deal harshly with them even if they support their elected leaders (in Russian parlance, "Nazis that have taken the Ukrainian people hostage").
> Strictly speaking, the fascist nature of the social organization of the Ukrainian population cannot be doubted. The authorities have long lost any contact with law and the Constitution. [..] Nothing else could be expected in the wake of the anti-constitutional coup of 2014.
> Russian people [in Ukraine] are openly promised three things: concentration camps, filtration, and criminal punishment (which means prison torture).
> In case of an offense in Donbass, it will be not enough to apply to Ukraine the pacification methods we tried in Georgia in 2008. It will be not enough to limit ourselves with separating and protecting the terrotories that directly suffered from [Ukrainian] military aggression, terror and military crimes committed by Ukrainian Nazi formations.
(Basically, the article calls for an all-out occupation of the whole of Ukraine)
> The top Nazi officials have managed, predominantly by leading a war against the Russian population of Ukraine as a whole and the Donbass in particular, to really create a common culpability that covers both the Nazi leaders and the Ukrainian population (its people).
 
9:38 AM
@CowperKettle that sounds like a cozy gathering of bigots. I wouldn't expect anything resembling reality from them
1950s CIA style
 
> That's why it would be impossible to remove this culpability factor, and prevent a revival of Ukrainian Nazism, without an adequate and commensurate denazification, using both the positive and the negative experience gained in the wake of WWII.
 
Sheer blind fanaticism
 
It sounds like the hysteria campaign launched throughout the USSR in the summer of 1968, when all newspapers told that Nazis and Fascists have captured Szechoslovakia, and the USSR must go and help (= invade Czechoslovakia with tank corps, which happened that year).
It is exactly that.
The Prague Spring (Czech: Pražské jaro, Slovak: Pražská jar) was a period of political liberalization and mass protest in the Czechoslovak Socialist Republic. It began on 5 January 1968, when reformist Alexander Dubček was elected First Secretary of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia (KSČ), and continued until 21 August 1968, when the Soviet Union and other Warsaw Pact members invaded the country to suppress the reforms. The Prague Spring reforms were a strong attempt by Dubček to grant additional rights to the citizens of Czechoslovakia in an act of partial decentralization of the economy...
And then we invaded and stifled the Prague Spring.
Throughout Russia, people in factories and institutes were forced to hold meeting, during which they "spoke their mind" as to how our glorious Army should go and "protect and denazify" Czechoslovakia.
 
9:58 AM
This isn't 1968 though
@CowperKettle I'm sure unlike what the state wants you to think, there are enough people out there like you that it's not 1968
Think of it like this: How successful have you been that the state needs such misinformation campaigns to try to get people on their side?
 
 
4 hours later…
1:58 PM
@M.A.R. In comparison, in 1968 the US was fighting a war to prop up a corrupt government in Vietnam. The young people of the time rose up and demonstrated, sometimes violently (but for the most part peacefully), against that war, and were repressed, sometimes brutally.
Governments do seem to hate it when the people don't agree with governmental aims and adventures.
 
 
1 hour later…
3:05 PM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Bad keyword in answer, offensive answer detected, potentially bad keyword in answer, toxic answer detected (246): Are both "tradable" and "tradeable" correct? by Mycumdribblesfrommypenis123456 on english.SE
 
3:46 PM
 
4:34 PM
@CowperKettle 'withers' is pretty specific to horse anatomy...also a very Germanic word. That explanation ('opposite that load') comes from etymonline, which usually gets its explanations from OED. But it does not sound right to me...it is not opposite -anything- on the horse (a load on the horse probably goes no further up than the withers but that doesn't seem very 'opposite'.
The German version though is much more intuitive... when you ride a horse and are holding the reins (or even with out reins) your hands (or wrists) are right at that spot, so one could be said to have ones wrists opposite that place.
 
4:50 PM
> There is a lack of clinical evidence from randomized, controlled trials, due to the logical and ethical problem involved with conducting such trials in emergency situation.
I wonder whether this means "a total absense of such evidence" or just "insufficient amount of such evidence".
 
5:04 PM
@CowperKettle It sounds like there’s anecdotal evidence but no formal study.
 
@CowperKettle It could be either. All the sentence tells you that there isn't enough; this "not enough" could be a little or nothing at all.
 
5:43 PM
An airplane with 10 engines: 6 piston engines and 4 jet engines (closer to the ends of the wings)
 
6:30 PM
@Robusto Isn't calling it sexist a bit jumping to conclusions?
My Occam's razor suggests Rousseau's "brioche" quote ended up being attributed to her, maybe deliberately. But this sort of stuff isn't uncommon, I remember a lot of apocryphal stories attributed to real people that were really some mainstream author's words about a fictional character
 
6:43 PM
@CowperKettle Or it could be conflicting studies, or studies with small sample sizes the author doesn't trust, or . . .
 
 
1 hour later…
7:50 PM
@M.A.R. those latter two would not be 'lack of evidence' but 'conflicting' 'poor' or 'insufficient'
which then leads me to believe that 'lack' doesn't mean 'less than fully' but instead means 'none'.
 
@Mitch hmm, right. My mistake
 
@M.A.R. Maries Antoinette has a cool name. Eva Braun does not. I guess it would only be sexist if it were only the female companions who were being blamed.
But also, I don't see what the big deal is with brioche.
It's like bread that is a little too fluffy and maybe too sweet.
or bad cake
I mean
it's not bad exactly
I just don't see the point
 
I have no idea what brioche is actually
 
male bread or make cake
don't do it half assed
 
We do have a lot of sweet bread types here I wouldn't be able to translate into English
 
7:56 PM
and call it some goofy nonsense word like 'brioche'
It's like the French have to have a different word for everything
 
Except gingerbread. The other day I was sitting on the toilet and EUREKA, gingerbread is actually nan-e zanjabili. Which is kinda obvious. So I didn't run outside naked
 
@M.A.R. it's maybe like challah?
 
Ch-what
Sounds like sacrilege
 
@M.A.R. Thanks you for the added details. Or lack thereof.
@M.A.R. No...sacrilege is too crunchy.
zanjabili is just ginger, right?
 
@Mitch oh that, we have that too, but I dunno if we call it anything
Generally we just refer to fancy bread as "fantasy bread"
Nan-e fantezi
 
7:59 PM
what's ;fancy' bread?
is it fancy?
 
@Mitch yeah, the adjective for ginger. Zanjebil is the noun
 
I hope so
 
@Mitch I guess the definition is sweet bread you don't have for breakfast
I think us Iranians use a lot of bread compared to the rest of the world
So a fancy vs. nonfancy bread distinction is useful
 
French bread is all the same they just put it in different shapes.
Germans have a whole bunch of breads. All really great.
 
So 'lavash' or 'sangak' or 'barbari' are normal bread
 
8:01 PM
what's a non-normal bread?
 
French and German bread would probably be more sugary than what you're used to and would be fantezi bread
@Mitch less common
 
brioche yes, but not the regular french bread or the tons of weird german bread.
searches for weird german bread
 
Hmm, we cut brioche into thin loaves (?) and call it toast
Other than that they all look alike
What's the difference between challah and brioche?
 
Sounds redundant
All the brackets and parentheses inside probably don't help
 
8:05 PM
wait...there's more that's self serving
> Germany's most popular breads are rye-wheat (Roggenmischbrot), toast bread (Toastbrot), whole-grain (Vollkornbrot), wheat-rye (Weizenmischbrot), white bread (Weißbrot), multigrain, usually wheat-rye-oats with sesame or linseed (Mehrkornbrot), rye (Roggenbrot), sunflower seeds in dark rye bread (Sonnenblumenkernbrot), pumpkin seeds in dark rye bread (Kürbiskernbrot) and roasted onions in light wheat-rye bread (Zwiebelbrot).
 
Oh if whole grain etc. count we have quite a few lavash types then
For example
Do Americans consume much bread?
It is said by nutritionists here that our curses are bread and rice. We don't get more obese by big franchise fast food, it's just that our base meals are themselves pretty carb-rich
 
It's the total calories that matter, not so much their source.
 
Well I'm saying they amount up to quite a few calories
At least the nutritionists think so. Or it may be that white bread and white rice aren't that filling
A tad bit alarmist though I think.
Why does everyone like referencing 1984, ugh. Have they even read that book?!
Dune author Frank Herbert said a trilateral political relationship is the most unstable, maybe because the alliance and the betrayals always turn it into a 2 vs. 1 situation?
 
@CowperKettle As they used to say, "Four burning, six turning."
@M.A.R. Well, against the general attitude toward women at the time ... yeah, sure. Sexism has been a major feature of human civilization throughout history.
 
8:23 PM
@Robusto Well, shouldn't we be a bit more discreet than that in applying the label? I mean, people of those times were more superstitious, less vaccinated, and probably on average half a centimeter shorter. I think sexism might be just as relevant to the issue. Again, just Occam's razor
 
@M.A.R. There were periods in history when slavery was the norm, but does that mean we shouldn't call it slavery?
 
Well if the story involves it, we should. Here it might not
 
I don't think that was the entire point of the article, but I don't see anything wrong with the mention. Calling a spade a spade when you see one.
 
I mean, who knows how many things Shakespeare or Tolstoy or Wilde or Steinbeck said made it into urban legends. There might be some -ist undercurrent about some of them, and there might not
 
Maybe, maybe not. Your mileage may vary. I personally didn't find it beyond the pale.
 
8:27 PM
Hmm okay
 
8:41 PM
@CowperKettle That particular bomber (B-36) was rather quickly replaced with the B-52, which has been in service since the mid-1950s and is still used today.
The Boeing B-52 Stratofortress is an American long-range, subsonic, jet-powered strategic bomber. The B-52 was designed and built by Boeing, which has continued to provide support and upgrades. It has been operated by the United States Air Force (USAF) since the 1950s. The bomber is capable of carrying up to 70,000 pounds (32,000 kg) of weapons, and has a typical combat range of more than 8,800 miles (14,080 km) without aerial refueling.Beginning with the successful contract bid in June 1946, the B-52 design evolved from a straight wing aircraft powered by six turboprop engines to the final prototype...
I sure wish we could scrap all that crap. Hasn't our civilization matured enough to make war obsolete yet? sigh
 
8:55 PM
@Robusto Why discuss war when there are dad jokes?
 
BTW, 1984 has been coming true as long as I've been alive. There's always been a war with eternally shifting alliances.
War seems to be the only constant in the history of civilization, and everybody thinks that's just normal.
 
9:32 PM
@M.A.R. I'd say 'not a lot'. But I'm sure there are graphs that show by country the amount...
trying to cut and paste the image is a pain.
but unfortunately Iran does not show on that graph.
also it shows France and the US next to each other, but every one knows (and other graphs too) that France is the first in the world of bread eating. Because you can't eat all that cheese straight up
@M.A.R. because they think it makes you sound smart.
we all had to read it in high school, don't know what the kidses these days have to read.
Bridget Jones' Diary?
 

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