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12:20 AM
@CowperKettle I'd read of this.
 
@CowperKettle Westminster Abbey definitely looks more like Notre-Dame than it does St Paul's. :)
 
that's from back when Paul was alive
 
Ah not yet Sainted.
Thank you, Christopher Wren.
 
Zoomer/boomer bait.
 
12:30 AM
Christopher Robin?
Did not live at St John's Wood but at the Hundred Acre Wood instead.
 
@MetaEd In those halcyon days. (Inherited from Middle English Alceoun, from Latin halcyōn, alcyōn (“kingfisher”), from Ancient Greek ἀλκυών (alkuṓn).)
> A kingfisher whose nesting by the sea was said, in classical mythology, to cause the Gods to restrain the wind and waves.
 
Poulaines, also known by other names, were a style of unisex footwear with extremely long toes that were fashionable in Europe at various times in the Middle Ages. The poulaine proper was a shoe or boot of soft material whose elongated toe (also known as a poulaine or pike) frequently required filling to maintain its shape. The chief vogue for poulaines spread across Europe from medieval Poland in the mid-14th century and spread across Europe, reaching upper-class England with the 1382 marriage of Richard II to Anne of Bohemia and remaining popular through most of the 15th century. Sturdier forms...
> In 1465, they were banned in England altogether, so that all cordwainers and cobblers within the City of London and environs were prohibited from making shoes with pikes more than 2 inches long.
> Nulle persone Cordewaner ou Cobeler .. face.. ascuns soler galoges ou husend oveqe ascun pike ou poleine qe passera la longuer ou mesure de deux poutz
 
The birth of the fashion police 🚨
 
Sumptuary laws (from Latin sūmptuāriae lēgēs) are laws that try to regulate consumption. Black's Law Dictionary defines them as "Laws made for the purpose of restraining luxury or extravagance, particularly against inordinate expenditures for apparel, food, furniture, or shoes, etc." Historically, they were intended to regulate and reinforce social hierarchies and morals through restrictions on clothing, food, and luxury expenditures, often depending on a person's social rank. Societies have used sumptuary laws for a variety of purposes. They were used to try to regulate the balance of trade by...
 
@CowperKettle that takes me back
7
Q: Usage of 'halcyon' to describe something other than a period of time

p.s.w.gCan I use the term halcyon to mean calm or tranquil when describing something other than a period of time, especially a place or setting? For example, does the following sentence seems unnatural or contrived? He walked through the halcyon temple, admiring the aging frescoes. All dictionari...

 
12:41 AM
@CowperKettle Oh that kind of consumption, not the tuberculosis kind.
 
> A free-born woman may not be accompanied by more than one female slave, unless she is drunk; she may not leave the city during the night, unless she is planning to commit adultery; she may not wear gold jewelry or a garment with a purple border, unless she is a courtesan;
 
so consumption but not of potatoes
 
- Cause of visit?
- Planning to commit adultery, sir
- You may pass
 
That folk etymon is a strange attractor.
Well, that's weird, the old pronuns-heation.
 
I was just wondering, is there a way to shut off one boxing in chat rooms?
 
12:44 AM
Don't believe so.
 
Thanks.
 
1:12 AM
@CowperKettle It worked very well for me, for anxiety. More effective than medication.
N=1, of course, but most meta-analyses show it's quite effective.
Didn't help my mood much, but whatever I had probably wasn't ordinary depression, and it seems like something one should try along with medication.
 
1:42 AM
@CowperKettle that's why lots of instances helps make a better test of the hypothesis. Because nothing is a %100.
@CowperKettle yeah I really don't know much
 
1:56 AM
@user85795 don't make the URL the entire char message. Add some text beforehand
I'm guessing that might work
 
2:12 AM
@alphabet Yes, meta-analyses show it's effective, but that page argues that the effect is so small as to be zero from the statistical standpoint, because one needs an effect size of >7 to believe that any kind of effect exists at all
they've added transport based on GPS transmitted data from each tram/bus/trolleybus
Now you can not only ask for a best rout to your destination but actually see the needed trams crawling on the map.
So, for instance, you can avoid waiting in the cold at the tram stop but just hop out a caffee or your apartment at the exact time.
 
2:29 AM
@CowperKettle IIRC that's not quite what "effect size" means from a statistical standpoint; even their graph says a size of 0.5 is clinically significant. That said, effect size is a very imperfect measure.
 
@alphabet I forgot the exact term used in that critical page.. lemme look
> "As meager as the results for antidepressants are, the results for CBT are even worse. Researchers seem to think that subjects get a trivial amount better, but subjects themselves seem to feel no better compared to pill placebo."
> The community seems to have just accepted this finding as meaning that CBT works, without apparently addressing the fact that the effect represents less than a two-point drop on a 52-point symptom scale, which is, as explained above, not clinically significant and probably not even clinically detectable.
> [...] If the “stigma and shame” preventing people from seeking mental health treatment disappeared overnight, and everyone got treatment – and this seems to have largely happened, as antidepressants and CBT are as popular as they have ever been – it seems unlikely to make any difference in outcome.
 
2:50 AM
@CowperKettle That author seems to have no relevant expertise; I wouldn't trust them.
 
@alphabet Yes, could be so. It's that Eiko Fried is subscribed to him on Twitter, and that interested me
 
The meta-analysis doesn't seem to ever say that the drop is only 2 points. I suspect he's misreading one of the figures in it, which shows a drop of 2 in some fancy metric calculated from HAM-D scores.
 
The older I'll get, the less discerning of the quality of sources I'll get, according to statistical research. I think that I should avoid reading on politics alltogether for that reason.
 
He's just a layperson misreading the scientific literature.
 
I don't know his name or education etc.
I wonder what percentage of patients is resistant to CBT in depression
The rough estimate bandied about for mainline antidepressant meds is 30% and for "everything we could throw at it" is 15% (the latted figure is stated by Lisa Pan for severe resistant depression with attempts of suicide)
 
3:04 AM
The thing is: most depressive episodes resolve on their own within a year, and many on much shorter timescales. Any treatment will "work" for a majority of patients if you give it enough time.
 
So it might be that a vast majority of depression studies are trash; too short in duration
 
@CowperKettle Mmm, trash. Perhaps I should become a depression researcher.
 
 
4 hours later…
7:02 AM
LOL
Dang. I saw an interesting review in it. Another journal publishing trash research
 
7:37 AM
Adjective: gruntled (comparative more gruntled, superlative most gruntled)
  1. (obsolete) Grunted.
  2. gruntled (comparative more gruntled, superlative most gruntled)
  3. (humorous) Satisfied, pleased, contented. [from 1930s]
  4. Antonym: disgruntled
 
 
1 hour later…
8:48 AM
@Mitch And some moms just make up stuff to entertain themselves, especially since the '80s.
 
I'm going to the doctor's office tomorrow, and I cannot choose where to dine in-between the route.
McDonald's or KFC?
 
9:10 AM
I'd choose KFC.
@Mitch yup, that works. Thanks.
 
@DannyuNDos You could prepare healthy food and bring it along :)
 
@CowperKettle Mitch said something about Wiktionary's especially add on… I don't really pay attention; but from now on, possibly, all my especially phrases will add only arbitrary info. It's just for fun, especially with Nutellington. We tried that today…meh.
 
9:33 AM
The Iranian interwiki for trail mix is آجیل
 
9:50 AM
@Mitch It's probably less complicated than that…but today I told my husband: 'Oh, we haven't ever been diagnosed because we're smarter than everybody else.' And he agreed, 'Yes,' with almost a half-smile…because that is how his kind responds to whatever; we're not sure.'
 
 
2 hours later…
11:49 AM
So I fall asleep to true crime, oops, and I have a "scary" dream—'It's Bubble Face Man! Wait, who is he? Is the pimple-popper lady on? No, it's Bubble Face! Remember, from your childhood, a recurring nightmare…over 50 yrs ago?? Wow, it's amazing what a mind can dredge up. Man, you are like…Dick Tracy scary. Ew, time to wake up.' And that was it, just a flashback to a nightmare that NEVER happened, a prequel/sequel to nothing. See, this is what happens after all your real dreams die…
 
 
1 hour later…
12:52 PM
Whoever closed our question english.stackexchange.com/questions/620003 is an idiot. Why? Because an optional comma is NOT the same as an opinion-based question.
 
1:08 PM
@AlMa1r I agree. Voting to reopen.
 
1:19 PM
What kind of tea is hard to swallow?
Realitea
 
1:39 PM
A new AI model claimed to better respond to questions about long videos
 
1:56 PM
@HippoSawrUs I've had the weirdest dreams when upping/decreasing my daily lamotrigine dose
When I got to about 50 mg, there was an amazing, movie-like horror but I was inside, and it was repeating, but each repeat differed a little. And the part with ancient Rus princes sailing on giant ships in the sea, wooden ships but with numerous decks rising high, was amazing.
 
@alphabet they should add voting reasons for reopening, eg 'options aren't opinions' or 'stop being a dick, just let other people answer's
But that kind of question has probably been asked a thousand times
 
2:12 PM
@CowperKettle Great
 
2:32 PM
Has anyone tried 5G yet?
 
 
2 hours later…
4:12 PM
@AlMa1r In French, the comma would be mandatory: En tant que professeur, je [...]
 
4:57 PM
A tasty mistake!
Pierre Curie ( KURE-ee, French: [pjɛʁ kyʁi]; 15 May 1859 – 19 April 1906) was a French physicist, a pioneer in crystallography, magnetism, piezoelectricity, and radioactivity. In 1903, he received the Nobel Prize in Physics with his wife, Marie Skłodowska–Curie, and Henri Becquerel, "in recognition of the extraordinary services they have rendered by their joint researches on the radiation phenomena discovered by Professor Henri Becquerel". With their win, the Curies became the first ever married couple to win the Nobel Prize, launching the Curie family legacy of five Nobel Prizes. == Early life... ==
 
 
1 hour later…
6:06 PM
@AlMa1r Please look over the duplicates I have selected for you, then let us know whether they cover what you're asking about. We've had dozens if not scores of nearly identical questions on our site about comma placement following introductory phrases. Since it's merely punctuation not grammar, for the most part this is a matter of publishing-house (or personal) style not of "correctness", and so it's to be expected that opinions and examples will vary and conflict across time and register.
There
can
be
only
one
.
Requiescant in pace 31k† Ukrainian troops.
 
7:16 PM
According to the estimates on Wikipedia, Russia has killed 11,000 Ukrainian civilians in the past 2 years. Israel has killed nearly 30,000 in the past 4.5 months.
 
@CowperKettle I dunno about "strongly", and I haven't looked at the analysis. CBT and antidepressants are moderately effective at least, of course, not as effective as they should be (or could be, patient adherence is fuzzy) and this has been demonstrated numerous times. If someone claims otherwise, I'm going to be skeptical and require extraordinary evidence.
 
 
3 hours later…
10:48 PM
Wordle 981 4/6

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🟩🟩🟩🟩🟩
Daily Octordle #762
🕛7️⃣
🕚5️⃣
8️⃣6️⃣
🔟9️⃣
Score: 68
Daily Sequence Octordle #762
5️⃣7️⃣
8️⃣9️⃣
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Score: 75
 
11:04 PM
@M.A.R. So ... is there something wrong with seeking happiness?
 

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