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7:32 AM
Hello,

What does "to move past this" mean from this sentence?:
"But, we may need to move past this at some point."
 
7:45 AM
3
Q: What does "move past people" mean in this context?

dan It can be a very sensual spot to touch lightly as a form of flirting, or just to move past people. I came across this sentence from here. "Move past" seems to be a slang, and I haven't managed to find it in dictionaries. What's it supposed to mean here?

Not sure if it is what you need, but looks like related
 
8:06 AM
@Vikas Makes sense, thanks
Has anyone used Gramarrly ?
 
8:25 AM
Yesterday we had 833 new covid cases in my region, today it's 1200. We are following the path already trodden by European countries and the USA, but in Russia only 52% of population has received vaccines. Furthermore, this may be an underestimate, since a sizable proportion has bought fake vaccination certificates, and databases were altered by bribed local officials.
Nobody knows how many people faked vaccination, but in Yekaterinburg it's easy to do, costs just about 5000 rubles, less than $100.
@Hairi My translator friend in St. Pete used it back in 2016, and is probably still using it.
She said it's good.
Her major foreign language was French. She loves French, and has only switched to English because it brings more orders.
 
9:24 AM
@CowperKettle I don't know why vaccination became slow in most countries after half the population got it. Did they slow down intentionally? Or lack of doses?
 
9:40 AM
@Vikas At least in some places, many people aren't willing to take it, for whatever reason. At least in part it is distrust of the govt/authority. This doesn't seem to be the case in India, as far as I can tell.
 
@FaheemMitha In many area some people used to believe vaccine can't be trusted. They felt it's unsafe. But with time, they are getting vaccinated.
 
@Vikas Well, obviously people who think that are wrong. And over time some of them realise it.
I'm all for being distrustful of the govt. Most of them can't be trusted. But one should pick and choose sensibly what to be distrustful about. I mean, they're criminals. They're not insane.
 
@CowperKettle There I often see a warning "Wordly sentences". Any idea what does it mean?
Or "Intricate text"
 
@Vikas Lack of doses can also certainly be an issue. The attempts to quickly make the vaccines generally available have bogged down in intellectual property issues. Translation: the corporations are mostly focused on making as much money they can out of it "while the sun shines".
 
@Hairi Can you give example. I'll try to check
@FaheemMitha maybe
 
10:23 AM
What is the literal meaning of take something with grain of salt?
 
@Vikas Literal? It's a figurative expression. It means don't believe everything you hear.
Do you mean where this expression derives from?
 
@FaheemMitha Yes. I understand when to use it. But I want to know why salt? What is grain here? And why is it like taking a grain of salt?
Like "Kill two birds with one stone"
 
@Vikas OK, so the origin of the phrase. No idea, sorry. You could do a search and you don't come up with anything, then I think it would be on topic for ELU. But check the scope first.
 
ok
 
To take something with a "grain of salt" or "pinch of salt" is an English idiom that suggests to view something, specifically claims that may be misleading or unverified, with skepticism or to not interpret something literally.In the old-fashioned English units of weight, a grain weighs approximately 65 mg, which is about how much table salt a person might pick up between the fingers as a pinch. == History == Hypotheses of the phrase's origin include Pliny the Elder's Naturalis Historia, regarding the discovery of a recipe for an antidote to a poison. In the antidote, one of the ingredients was...
Sounds like nobody knows. Those look like guesses to me.
And they are all quite old, too.
 
10:58 AM
@FaheemMitha yeah. I couldn't understand all the explanations available. It has something to do with pinch of salt or small amount of salt
 
 
@Hairi It is confusing to me too. Can't say much.
 
11:44 AM
@Vikas Didn't read the Wikipedia article, but I always imagined it was because salt wasn't as easily available in the old times, so people had a lot of salt appetite, and it made a meal pretty desirable. "grain" is obviously an overexaggeration. So a lie, or something you should be skeptical of, is bland and tasteless, or maybe it tastes horrible, so you need lots of salt to mask the taste.
@Hairi is this paragraph yours, and you want a quick proofread, or is it someone else's, and you're asking what it means?
Right now it's sorta unintelligible. I suggest explaining your first possible solution in a separate paragraph, and not making a numbered list of "easier" implementations if that list will contain one or two items.
 
@M.A.R. I think he basically wants to know why Grammarly showing those two issues: Intricate and Word choice
 
@Vikas Grammarly is stupid.
Having said that, that part of the paragraph does sound a bit wordy. And you do need an article before "easier".
 
@M.A.R. An
 
@Vikas yes, Grammarly is an stupid
 
@M.A.R. I don't use it. I fear if I use it it will correct me so much I will forget my English I already know 😜
 
12:12 PM
@M.A.R. Interesting. It makes sense now :D
 
12:33 PM
@Hairi It's better to phrase the question thus: "Any idea what it means?"
I think that "wordy sentence" is a sentence that can be made shorter.
@Vikas In Russia, vaccination rates slumped because in all opinion polls some 35% of Russians say that they will never, ever get vaccinated.
For some reason, there are a lot of anti-vaxxers in Russia.
I came across one woman who asked me several times if I know a good source for purchasing a fake vaccine certificate.
Another woman said to me that her husband bought a fake certificate.
I have no reason to doubt their words. I was unsure, but now I do believe that a large portion of the Russian population has bought fake papers.
It was a shock to me, and still is a shock. I cannot find any reason to this.
 
 
1 hour later…
1:39 PM
@CowperKettle :P
@CowperKettle lol
@CowperKettle but why? They think vaccine is not safe?
>Not for the faint of heart or those easily triggered by English (or other languages) in
>the raw. That doesn't mean we want to talk about waste elimination or hemorrhoids or
>other such topics.
Could someone help me understand the meaning of it
 
2:01 PM
@Vikas Yes.
One woman said to me about the tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) vaccine that "if God wills me to die of TBE, let it be".
That is, it's wrong to get vaccinated, let Nature take its course.
 
@CowperKettle Aren't they well educated?
 
@Vikas This particular woman has full course of school education, then a university, where she studied for a programmer. Then she worked in the steel industry, preparing documents for large-scale equipment and material tenders.
Finally, she decided to go into massage therapy and finished courses where she learned Latin and for a couple of months worked as a nurse, and had to take an exam on human anatomy.
 
Ok. Hard to believe then. Here if someone is reluctant to get vaccinated, it's because either he is illiterate or not well educated.
 
She passed the exam and now has a basic nursing certificate, enabling to her to be a massage therapist. Of course she completed a massage therapy course.
 
Didn't you explain her it's safe?
 
 
1 hour later…
3:38 PM
@Vikas It's impossible to explain. She does not believe. You cannot prove the absense of something. Any foreign substance injected into the body can theoretically be unsafe.
No amount of testing will ever serve as a 100% proof of safety.
All kinds of errors happen during drug manufacture.
 
@CowperKettle Oh so we shouldn't blame them who refuse to get vaccinated?
 
We should, because the risks of dying from the vaccine are many times less those of dying from the virus.
 
4:45 PM
> Former Republican vice presidential candidate Sarah Palin, who last month said it would be "over my dead body" to get vaccinated, has tested positive for COVID-19
Should we blame Sarah Palin?
 
 
3 hours later…
7:21 PM
@CowperKettle Hardly surprising, considering the ubiquity and necessity of conceptual metaphors.
 
7:55 PM
@Cerberus You might want to walk that notion back if it can't run the course.
 
8:08 PM
@Cerberus If I'm killed in an explosion, I'll be sure to post about it here.
 
@Robusto That would take a long time and come at a high cost.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Excellent.
Perhaps you could install a Wifi module into your washing machine, so that it may notify us upon explosion?
 
I think washing-machine notifications are limited to loud noises and massive leaks.
Haha, and just as I said that our washing machine played a little tune to tell us it was finished with its cycle. Smart-ass!
 
I wish my machine could notify me that its carbon brushes were worn down - I mean, I wish it could notify me before they were worn down, so I could order them ahead of time.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 So you're saying your machine is carbon neutral?
 
More like a carbon denier, until it's totally failed, then it needs a bail-out
 
8:13 PM
@Robusto Thank you, Dave.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 So your machine is a square Trump?
 
@Robusto I appreciated that
 
@Cerberus There are worse things you could have than a haunted washing machine.
@Cerberus Except that it has done useful work in the past.
 
@Cerberus I wouldn't go that far. More like a German immigrant who's been here for years but now votes libertarian
 
@Robusto I suppose so!
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Hmm.
Are libertarians big in Canada?
 
no. I'm using an American metaphor.
 
8:17 PM
Everyone's a libertarian until they get sick or go bankrupt.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Oh, dear.
 
@Cerberus There's the usual problems with nuance in the press release. It actually -is- surprising, but not for the reasons expected. Sure, You'd think that a sentence that involves physical activity even if metaphorical, like 'kick the bucket' would somehow be associated with movement in the brain. But really the models of language in the brain are only currently expected to be in the language centers and not involve other modules in the brain like the motor region.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 By the way, do you ever watch former Torontonian(?) Jason Slaughter's Youtube channel, 'Not Just Bikes', mainly about traffic?
 
@Cerberus is he the Stroads guy? If so, yes, I've seen a few
 
Presumably the stroke victims' stroke lesions were limited to the motor region (the press release didn't say that, it just referred to 'stroke victim' vs 'non-stroke victim'
 
8:18 PM
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 He does mention stroads a lot! But I don't know whether he invented the word.
Do you like him?
@Mitch Hmm I see.
 
@Mitch But conceptual metaphors must occur first from the physical environment, right?
 
@Cerberus I am not really a traffic expert but what he says makes sense to me.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Same here.
 
That idea has legs.
 
But the youtube video that's been occupying my brain is this one about cryptocurrency and NFT.
 
8:21 PM
Two hours and 18 minutes! Who has time for a video like that!
 
it's worth every minute
 
@Cerberus The brain is pretty weird. More and more knowledge about strokes and other brain lesions show that very very specific parts of the brain do very very specific things (eg that one little area that handles facial recognition), but then also the same data shows that you can lose such areas and (with training) get back that function (supposedky with other areas).
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 There may be water on the moon, but I'll never drink it.
 
@Robusto sure, but you can get water on earth for less effort. This video explains crypto, NFT, etc, from a technical and social perspective in great detail. Definitely worth watching.
 
@Mitch Hmm yes, I thought the current trend was that functions are less located in specific areas than thought before.
 
8:23 PM
@Robusto conceptual metaphors based on physical properties must occur first from the physical environment, sure. but then are there metaphors (or even any language at all) that didn't at some point derive from the physical world?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Will it persuade me to change my mind, which currently holds that these things are some kind of wretched excess?
@Mitch You're asking me to prove a negative proposition?
 
@Robusto 100% not. But it will explain many things you may not have understood, or noticed, about the industry and its culture.
 
Like what?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 All I know at present is that my son made a pile of money on crypto. And that he will lose all of it if I ever "invest" in that pyramid scheme.
It is The Emperor's New Clothes of the 21st century.
 
But the point is that there is a fairly modular 'language' part of the brain (more primally connected in a pathway via the ear to temporal lobe stuff, Wernicke's and Broca's areas) and those are not heavily connected with the sensorimotor areas in the parietal lobe.
 
8:28 PM
@Mitch That would be my biggest fear about having a stroke: losing capability for language.
 
@Robusto The best quote
> More relevant, however, is the sheer density of these scams. The one market that cryptocurrency has successfully disrupted is the market of fraud. Think of this this way: a big population of people have willingly self-identified that they have substantial disposable income, poor judgment, low social literacy, a high tolerance for nonsensical risk, and are highly persuadable.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Nice. OK, maybe I'll watch it.
 
@Cerberus Like I said, the knowledge is mixed. One direction of research is showing that it has very specific modules, the other direction is that any part of the brain could have functionality taken over if removed. (not absolutely any, and not at any age. better if earlier on in life and better if not in the midbrain).
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 The only problem is that many people still make a lot of money off cryptos, the upper half of the pyramid, if you will.
 
@Cerberus so yes, but I' not sure which direction has more evidence currently (or maybe they're both reasonably true at the same time)
 
8:34 PM
@Mitch Quite possible the last.
 
@Robusto That youtube channel has a lot of great videos if you'd rather watch something shorter to see if you like it. He has a good documentary on flat-earthers, for example, but it's long. He has a bunch of videos about films.
 
The brain is not like the liver or the lungs where the activity it does is fairly homogeneous
But it's not like a computer where if you damage this one resistor out of billions, nothing else is taking over for it.
 
@Cerberus yeah, but it's all about there being a greater fool. In fact, many of the phenomenon described in the DAO section of that video are basically a historical repeat of the stock bubble of 1720, only, with environmentally-catastrophic tech glued on top
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 I'm getting to the point where a 10 min video is stretching my patience
 
@Mitch agreed, but this guy is good.
 
8:36 PM
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Or the tulip bubble.
Tulip mania (Dutch: tulpenmanie) was a period during the Dutch Golden Age when contract prices for some bulbs of the recently introduced and fashionable tulip reached extraordinarily high levels, with the major acceleration starting in 1634 and then dramatically collapsing in February 1637. It is generally considered to have been the first recorded speculative bubble or asset bubble in history. In many ways, the tulip mania was more of a then-unknown socio-economic phenomenon than a significant economic crisis. It had no critical influence on the prosperity of the Dutch Republic, which was one...
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 it'll go on the watch later list.
 
You could buy a house for the price of a tulip bulb.
 
and maybe at 2x time
@Cerberus I think you're missing the point. You could buy a really great tulip nulb for only the price of your house.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Like lotteries and stock markets!
 
Marketing knows where to put the extra adjectives.
 
8:37 PM
@Mitch Fair enough!
 
I have this funny feeling that the tulip bulb is not the size of a house.
 
@Cerberus like stock markets, only, the companies you're buying have no logical basis for their valuation.
@Cerberus yeah but tulip bulbs are actually useful.
 
I know I could look it up on wikipedia but what happened -after- the tulip bubble popped ? (this activated my sensory-motor context to process)
I mean -somebody- got rich right?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Exactly.
 
Did it just redistribute some money from a few rich people to other rich people? Did the suckers get kicked into the street?
 
8:41 PM
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Only minimally so.
@Mitch No, it's not an American tulip bulb.
 
@Cerberus They make an OK soup
 
@Mitch Probably something like that, yes.
 
@Cerberus more than, say, ownership in a crypto-currency-backed DAO
 
@Mitch My grandmother ate tulip bulbs during the Hunger Winter of 1944–45.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Yes, although I don't know any abbreviations.
 
@Cerberus Have you seen American houses?
 
8:43 PM
No, they were too large.
 
Painting with microbes proves that you can have two different types of culture in the same dish.
 
 
How very average American.
 
My toolshed
 
At least it is defensible.
 
8:44 PM
@Mitch Didn't the Wicked Witch of the West live there once upon a time?
 
Probably not. That's all papier-mache
@Robusto no. that's connecticut. they wouldn't let her buy there.
 
You have to draw the line somewhere.
 
redlining by real estate is how it starts
> NFT ledgers claim to provide a public certificate of authenticity or proof of ownership, but the legal rights conveyed by an NFT can be uncertain. NFTs do not restrict the sharing or copying of the underlying digital files and do not prevent the creation of NFTs with identical associated files.
So you may have paid a bajillion dollars for an NFT, but the associated png can be copied all over.
It's not like Skreli owning Wu-Tang clan's single physical copy of that one album they made.
now googling for DAO
 
@Mitch Exactly.
Or you still cannot copy or use it yourself without violating copyright.
 
It seems kinda dumb
 
8:55 PM
Just a random pyramid scheme, NFTs.
 
Maybe we should invest in air. Because if you can't breathe, nothing else matters.
 
I am my own bank!
holds breath
still holding breath
you're just waiting for me to gibe up aren't you
 
Go ahead, I'll wait.
 
goddamit
...
yes those are italicised
eyes tearing up
 
@Robusto You could publish an NFT which you say is connected to Earth's atmosphere.
Generate some publicity, interest some people who think it might become valuable, and profit.
 
8:58 PM
@Mitch Not even Wim Hof could hold out forever.
Wim Hof (born 20 April 1959), also known as The Iceman, is a Dutch motivational speaker and extreme athlete noted for his ability to withstand freezing temperatures. He has set Guinness World Records for swimming under ice and prolonged full-body contact with ice, and previously held the record for a barefoot half marathon on ice and snow. He attributes these feats to his Wim Hof Method (WHM), a combination of frequent cold exposure, breathing techniques, yoga and meditation. Hof has been the subject of several medical assessments and a book by investigative journalist Scott Carney. == Personal... ==
 
sunuvabitch
I can't talk in italics all day
@Robusto No I wasn't going that way. I was just trying to say that not all metaphors are based on movement. eg 'time is money'. the metaphor being treating time as a quantity that you can save and spend and has worth depending on how much. I think the paper (or the press release) gave the example of 'he is a cold fish' as a non-motor metaphor.
 
9:16 PM
@Mitch But not a non-physical one, surely.
 
@Robusto I can't think of any non-physical metaphors but I'm sure there've gotta be some.
using 'literally' for 'really a lot'?
 
@Mitch That answer is like a bitcoin marrying a dogecoin.
 
@Mitch But these are all living metaphors, not conceptual ones?
 
9:33 PM
@Cerberus wWhat is the distinction exactly? The article uses 'action' and 'non-action' presumably one involving a physical movement, like kicking a bucket, and one where no motor skills are involved, a fish that is cold.
 
@Mitch Yeah. An NFT is a serial number that's unique to its blockchain, and a tiny payload that maybe refers to a file or something. If I create an NFT of an image on one blockchain, then create another NFT of that image on the same blockchain, or another NFT of that image on a different blockchain, or I just delete the file the NFT points to.... the blockchain will dutifylly record who purchased that serial number, and store it forever, but that's all it will do.
 
@Mitch A living metaphor is one that still feels like a metaphor.
A dead metaphor: you only realise it is metaphorical when you think about it.
And a conceptual metaphor is a deeply entrenched metaphor we use to express various fundamental concepts, or even think about them.
So, in "a long time", the word "long" is a conceptual metaphor (and, trivially, a dead one).
It is part of the complex web of the metaphorical use of physical length to express temporal and other 'lengths'.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Yeah, and I never understood why anybody ever cared about them.
 
Can anyone tell the Brits to calm down? My phone keeps trying to update English (UK)
 
9:49 PM
A register of ownership in a blockchain can be useful, bypassing notaries and such; but the thing whose ownership is proven this way should still be like any other kind of possession. There is no special type of things that can be owned through NFTs.
@M.A.R. Calm down.
 
@Cerberus oi ain' neu Brit, guvnor
 
Lovely accent.
 
As authentic as one watching BBC4 shows can muster
@Cerberus seems to me there's three types of Bitcoin enthusiasts. The ones that really do like the fact that they don't deal in dollars and euros, the ones that like "idle" games where you tap something on your phone and a number goes up, and the ones that really don't do anything much with it but keep trying to justify why Bitcoin takes more power usage than Denmark by referring to the first group
I dunno how much overlap there is but I can't shake off the feeling these people are onto something I can't see.
 
What blockchain achieves is a way to maintain database integrity when you don't trust the operators of the database. It does nothing to solve the "garbage in, garbage out" problem and makes data correction harder.
@M.A.R. watch the video I recommended above. chat.stackexchange.com/transcript/message/60243180#60243180
 
How far do I scroll?
 
9:56 PM
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 But also decentralisation of power.
 
Okay
 
@Cerberus Not really, for reasons explained in the video.
 
shrugs
You sound like a priest.
 
Maybe part of the appeal is no one knows what the heck it is
 
Unlike a priest, I encourage you to actually view the thing I am recommending, and critically examine it, and am willing to be convinced that I am wrong.
 
9:57 PM
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Okay, I'll watch it bit by bit
 
@M.A.R. it's long, but so, so worth it
it's broken down into chapters if that helps.
 
Well if it will only take a 2h movie for me to be able to hold my ground in these sorts of discussions it would be worth it, yeah
 
@M.A.R. in fact, that is part of the appeal. NFT buyers are part of an in-group that knows some secret, and they shun people who attempt to question the validity of their claims.
it's very cult-like
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 A protestant minister, then, who keeps telling you to read the Bible.
@M.A.R. I'd prefer text.
 
I mean, you have modernists that pretty much think anything new that has ones and zeroes in it is good, so there's probably some bias there. And of course some people decide they want to be biased against whatever the hippies are on about
 
10:00 PM
But I feel that I understand the basic concepts behind the phaenomenon.
 
@Cerberus Reading the Bible is what made me an atheist.
 
Hah.
I have never read it.
 
oh god.
really?!
 
Why would I?
Only the occasional short story.
It seemed rather childish and subliterary.
 
I've recited chunks of Quran as a kid. In a pretty brainless "can I sing it better" sort of way
 
I'm just not interested in random stories about supernatural cults.
 
Admire the early 2000s lego aesthetic while goggling at the weird-ass stories
 
Ours don't actually say "read the Quran" that much
 
I only read some bits that later, more interesting culture was based on.
 
I tried reading the Quran, in English. I don't think I completed the second surah.
 
10:04 PM
Haha it is pretty long
 
@Cerberus "random stories about supernatural cults" sounds really exciting actually
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Very impressive.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Hardly!
There are a million cults.
Producing silly nonsense.
 
Well, I mean, it basically sounds like fantasy novels
 
Huh, wonder why it isn't censored.
Though it probably will be after my visit
 
The brick bible?
Why would it be censored?
 
10:05 PM
Mhm
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 here we like censoring things
The last figure I read was 27 percent of the internet is censored in Iran
 
actually, the brick bible has a funny story - at one point it was published on paper. Then people got mad because it illustrates all these horrible stories in the bible. Like how someone had to kill a bunch of dudes to collect foreskins to give to a king so he could marry the king's daughter.
 
It sure feels more than that
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Most of which are pretty crappy, aren't they?
 
@Cerberus I dunno. I try not to read the crappy ones. There's lots of really good stories in that genre.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Why get mad at that?
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Indeed.
Much less so in religious ramblings...
 
10:07 PM
Oh I just started reading Guards! Guards!
 
@Cerberus Because they were expecting the kid-friendly illustrated bibles that make a comic book of the "good parts"
 
Moralistic little stories.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Hah.
 
@Cerberus it's pretty easy to get mad at a book
 
And instead this author illustrated all the weird shit
 
I wonder how they did the foreskins in Lego.
 
Oh now that one's censored
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Haha basic but elegant.
 
@Cerberus yeah
 
The red is a nice touch.
 
The lego art in this thing is mostly very old, in internet years. I haven't kept up to date with it so I don't know if there are newer illustrations that are better, using modern lego techniques.
 
10:11 PM
What would be a more modern technique?
Have you watched Lego Masters, by the way?
 
@Cerberus heh
Trying to recall Saul. Who was Saul, hmm
I'd probably recognize the Arabic/Persian name
 
Some king?
 
@Cerberus well, a lot of the builds in these scenes are pretty basic and use old parts. And, like, those figures are just strewn on a basic grey baseplate. Modern builders tend not to do that. But this builder was pretty unconventional, including cutting pieces in a few instances.
@Cerberus King of Jerusalem before David.
@Cerberus Some of it. GB seasons 1 and 2, AU season 1, US season 1.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Ouch!
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Which one is the best?
We're watching the Dutch version.
 
@Cerberus of those that I saw, the AU one was best. It filled me with so much joy.
 
10:16 PM
A friend told me that the versions in other countries are too similar to be fun, they have the exact same sequence of assignments.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Noted.
 
The US one was in, like, an uncanny valley of fun. It looked like it was supposed to resemble fun, but didn't, in a way that was difficult to articulate.
 
Haha, try!
 
yeah, the US one was very similar to the AU one.
 
Hmm how so?
 
same kind of set, many same challenges, same lighting and format.
 
10:17 PM
In the Dutch–Flemish version, contestants are very modest, they help each other, and the judges are friendly and full of praise, most of the time.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Ah, OK. And the British one?
 
British one was totally different.
 
OK, good.
 
I liked the builds produced in the AU, US ones better.
And the format of the show.
 
Hmm how so?
 
the UK one is a little dull in comparison.
almost like it's more of a kids' show
But yeah, how many times do I want to watch a setup where builders have to make a bridge, or make something to smash in slow-mo
They had some legit well-known AFOLs on the AU and US ones. I didn't recognize any of the UK folks.
 
10:20 PM
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Ah, yes, that. And which version had the bridge and the slow-motion smash-up?
The Dutch version does.
So I'd rather avoid whatever versions have the same.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 AF-whats?
 
But some of the AU/US show's schtick was a little trite. Like, oh no! the lights are all red and the clock's ticking! and somehow every single team is racing to get their builds over to the display area at the last second.
@Cerberus we've known each other for like, 10 years now, and you don't know that an AFOL is an Adult Fan of Lego?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Ah, yes, the Dutch version does that too, and I don't believe it at all.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 I'm terribly sorry.
 
All your proclivities and their jargon ought to be gospel to me.
 
it's not just me though, you've got Reg... is Reg still around?
 
10:23 PM
Sometimes.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 So how about the modesty of contestants and the friendliness of judges?
How is that in those versions?
 
Does the Dutch show have a super-colourful brick-built logo, a large build area in a factory, where the contestants enter under a large door, usually enwreathed in fog?
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 My granddaughter has started playing with blocks. She's 14 months, still too young for even Duplo, but it's a start.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 I don't know about the logo, but the rest, probably yes.
The large door and the fog, yes.
 
@Cerberus It's good, the contestants are usually super polite and even helpful to each other. It's very friendly. The AU one featured Kale Frost, who is a well-known AFOL and who even designed a lego set that was given away as a gift with purchase. On that show he was portrayed as the villain of the show. He was pretty arrogant. BUT he was a good builder.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Did this Frost participate as a contestant, or as a judge?
 
10:27 PM
@Robusto Nah, she'd be fine with duplo. 100%. Duplo pieces are huge, totally safe. And as soon as she knows not to eat the pieces, she'd be fine with regular Lego, unless she has no patience at all.
@Cerberus participant.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Hmm is the level of experience / skill of the various participants somewhat within the same league?
 
If you can get season one of Lego Masters AU, and you're enjoying the Dutch one, you may want to watch the AU one. It's basically the original of that version of the show, the first one they made that wasn't in the British format.
 
Hmm.
 
@Cerberus not all, no. But they weed out some of the contestants early on.
 
But is it fun to watch a version that resembles the Dutch one so much? That is what my friend warned against.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 Hmm OK. In the Dutch version, maybe their levels are somewhat closer, then.
Is the British version the first one?
 
10:30 PM
And the US show featured a team that was one AFOL, who'd registered alone, and a woman who'd never played with Lego as a child, but was an artist, and she one day on a whim made a portrait out of Lego... THAT was a bit of drama on the show. And it looked like it was legit drama, as opposed to some scripted nonsense.
@Cerberus yes.
 
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 This women should have been protected from herself.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 OK.
At any rate, it is kind of cool how mainstream Lego Masters is now.
Everyone watches it.
Lego's best marketing investment ever.
At my friend's office, they give everyone a Lego set, and they have to make something each month, within some theme.
And this is a kind of non-creative textwriting office.
 
@Cerberus Well, it was less that she didn't know what she was doing, and more that as a team they didn't know what they were doing together.
 
Ohh the two were pared up.
Bad idea.
 
Anyway TL;DR I really really enjoyed the AU S1 of the show, out of the 4 series I've watched, it was the most fun to watch.
 
The first Dutch season was won by two people with brain issues from cancer.
They seemed extremely stressed out and chaotic and emotional at first, we expected them to drop quickly.
But they improved and improved.
@Mr.ShinyandNew安宇 OK noted.
 
10:44 PM
@Robusto I tend to think of -all- figurative- uses as metaphorically. There always seems to be some ... transfer in metonymy or ... some other figurative thing
 
Isn't figurative synonymous with metaphorical?
 

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