« first day (3878 days earlier)      last day (32 days later) » 

12:23 AM
Last night was spectacular.
 
12:53 AM
Very orange.
 
If it were any oranger it's be ...
On fire?
 
1:17 AM
Yes, it looks kind of hellish.
 
1:35 AM
Red sky in morning, sailor take warning
Red sky at night, holy shit the land is burning all out west
 
Hmm are there fires where you live?
 
1:58 AM
Those aren't from fires.
This one's a little redder.
Actually those ARE from fires. But the fires are on the sun, not anywhere close to here.
And here's some context, zoomed out from the solar detail:
Little League ballpark on the left, with its lights showing.
 
2:16 AM
Nice.
My devices have been slow to connect to various domains this evening/night.
Including Google, but not this site.
Hmm I think it happens only via Wifi, not 4G.
 
2:44 AM
Computers are hard to understand.
 
Yeah.
They ought to improve their pronunciation.
Or at least stop eating pens while talking.
At least I assume that's where my lost pens go.
 
3:04 AM
What was the meaning of schans in Dutch in about 1680?
In Russia, fires are now in the East
Not a lot of fires in my region.
 
@CowperKettle Could be several things probably.
Mainly some sort of fence or wall, or some sort of deck on a ship.
@CowperKettle Ouch.
 
@Cerberus In Russian, Shkantsy still means "quarterdeck"
Derived from "schans"
 
@CowperKettle Ah, cool.
That's probably quite close.
 
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Bad keyword in title, offensive body detected, offensive title detected, potentially bad keyword in body, potentially bad keyword in title, +1 more (255): (potentially offensive title -- see MS for details) by Mycumdribblesfrommypenis123 on english.SE
 
3:20 AM
 
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Potentially bad keyword in answer, toxic answer detected, blacklisted user (152): (potentially offensive title -- see MS for details) by Mycumdribblesfrommypenis123 on english.SE
 
> It's 37 in Moscow
- Haha. Is it degrees or the year?
- Degrees or the year?
1937 was the most famous year of Stalin's repressions, so Russians often say "it's 37" when they hear news of political repressions.
In 1937, repressions in the USSR reached the upper tier of society, with regulations adopted that permitted the use of torture. Although it had been used before, it was used against the rules.
 
It was lie they were coming up with excuses to make thugs happy, to give them something fun to do like torture
 
For the simple folk, the hardest years were 1929-1932, with collectivization and famine. But since it was just "simple folk", little to nothing news percolated to the media in the subsequent years up to 1988, so 1937 went into the public consciousness as the "hardest year of repressions".
Moscow is now having the hardest heat wave in 70 years. In the media they call it the desert heat wave.
 
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Offensive answer detected, potentially bad keyword in answer, toxic answer detected, blacklisted user (230): What will be a proper use of modal verb will/would for distant probable situations? by Mycumdribblesfrommypenis123 on english.SE
 
3:32 AM
I was walking the corridors of my university in Yekaterinburg and looked on portraits of deparment heads hung on the walls, in the 1990s. And sure enough, for some of them the years of their occupation (job position) ended in 1936 or 1937. Since they were positioned high enough for the repressions to affect them.
The whole upper tiers of administrative, educational and army workers were sent to camps or shot.
It was safer to be in the lower administrative positions then.
 
 
5 hours later…
8:37 AM
Word of the day: gazetteer (A geographic dictionary or encyclopedia, sometimes found as an index to an atlas.)
 
8:49 AM
> From The gazetteer's: or newsman's interpreter, a geographical index edited by Laurence Echard, 1st ed. published 1693. In 1704, in the second volume Echard referred to the work as Gazetteer.
Laurence Echard (c. 1670–1730) was an English historian and clergyman. He wrote a History of England that was a standard work in its time. == Life == He was the son of the Rev. Thomas Echard or Eachard of Barsham, Suffolk, by his wife, the daughter of Samuel and Dorothy Groome, and was born at Barsham. On 26 May 1687, at the age of seventeen, he was admitted a sizar of Christ's College, Cambridge, where he graduated B.A. in 1692 and M.A. in 1695. Echard, having been ordained by John Moore, bishop of Norwich, was presented to the livings of Welton and Elkington, Lincolnshire, and was appoi...
@Cerberus - another Dutch-based Russian word: talrep taal + reep
 
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Bad keyword in answer, bad keyword with email in answer, blacklisted website in answer (265): A technical word to describe the correct contact between a wheel and a rail by Kate on english.SE
 
 
1 hour later…
10:30 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Link at end of answer, potentially bad keyword in answer (62): Why Cosmonaut, not Astronaut? by user426664 on english.SE
 
Cups for cupping therapy, Victorian England
I remember my mom performing cupping on me when I caught cold as a kid, in the mid-1980s
 
10:56 AM
@CowperKettle nice tidbit, TIL
 
 
1 hour later…
12:23 PM
I think I'm almost able to post a meta-meta question. The latest meta question about high-frequency editing has been closed, and I think there should be a question about whether closing this meta question is a good thing (it isn't!).
Am I seriously thinking of doing that? That's a meta question but probably not on topic anywhere.
 
@CowperKettle Oh, what does that mean?
 
12:38 PM
@Cerberus Turnbuckle, in the picture just above
Таль (от нидерл. talie) — подвесное грузоподъёмное устройство с ручным или механическим приводом, состоящее из подвижного и неподвижного блоков и проходящего через их шкивы троса (лопаря) или металлической цепи. Ручные тали делят по числу шкивов в обоих блоках. Бывают 2-, 3-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 10- и 12-шкивные тали. Иначе называют «тали в 1 (2, 3 и так далее) лопаря». Каждый шкив в подтягивающемся блоке обеспечивает двукратный выигрыш в силе и такой же проигрыш в расстоянии. Механизированные тали широко применяют во всех сферах современной промышленности. Их заранее, обычно при строительстве, монтируют...
Tal means "hoist" in Russian, from Dutch talie (as this article says)
 
Okay I didn't know that word.
And taal is some alternate spelling?
 
Probably yes, I'm not an expert in Dutch, only a beginner
Een talie is in de eenvoudigste vorm een samenstel van een touw en twee enkelschijfs blokken. Het touw wordt ook vaak ‘taliereep’ genoemd. == Toepassing == Hijsen van lasten, verplaatsen of vastzetten van lading, strak zetten van tentzeilen, bedienen en strak zetten van zeilen bij zeilvaartuigen. Bij deze toepassing, die vele variaties kent, zijn vele benamingen ontstaan, zoals: Halstalie Zwaardtalie - talie om de zwaarden van platbodemschepen uit het water te hijsen als ze niet worden gebruikt Bulletalie Wanttalie - hulpmiddel om het staande want extra op spanning te zetten. Riftalie - hulpmiddel...
I was just googling in Russian for "talrep etymology" ))
Maybe the Russian etymology sites are not quite right.
Because I have no favorite Russian etymology site, I just google around, and the sources and the spelling may be poor
One website says "From Dutch tаlrеер, tаljеrеер"
Haha
Today I met my friend who is an IT specialist working for international companies in Moscow. He said he thinks of moving abroad, because the news are grim in Russia, with arrests and suppression. And he doesn't want to spend his old years in a Putin-ruled repression-riddled Russia, since he clearly sees that Putin will never leave without an bloodshed.
He said that his friend who is not as skilled as he found a job in the Czech Republic a year ago, and moved there.
At least in the Czech Republic you are in a decent stable country.
 
1:01 PM
@tchrist: You might want to delete this account. Serial vandalizer.
 
1:17 PM
@CowperKettle Haha is right. Damn, they out themselves, don't they?
 
@CowperKettle Ahh talje, now it makes sense to me.
That must be from French taille, "length, girth".
Related to English tall?
 
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Bad keyword with email in body, potentially bad ns for domain in body, potentially bad keyword in body (57): How many are looking for a English coaching online that can help professionally? by B20 BRITISH SCHOOL on english.SE
 
@CowperKettle Pro tip: In English, news is treated as singular. Other languages (Sp: las noticias, De: die Nachrichten, etc.) treat it as plural. I guess it's plural in Russian as well. (новости?)
 
Ah, no, it is from Italian tagliare "cut", related to English tailor.
Which is no doubt related to French taille.
 
@Cerberus That was my first thought.
 
1:29 PM
Ultimately from Latin talea "bar, cutting, twig".
 
Our English word tally has the same origin.
 
Yes that makes sense.
 
1:46 PM
Non-gendering has interesting implications for kinship terms - what do you call a sibling of a parent, what do you call a child of a sibling, the child of anybody? Your own sibling?
Sure, you can say 'my sibling', but 'my sibling's child' makes it sound like they're 10 years old.
 
@Mitch In Dutch, there isn't even a word for sibling.
We only have broer en zuster.
 
@Cerberus In some languages, there's only a word for those at your generation (eg no different word for brother vs cousin or mother vs aunt). It's all 'My gen-X-er took me to get firecrackers". ie no difference between your direct bio parents and their siblings, they're all caretakers.
Also, in such societies, you usually die of malaria before you're 20.
 
2:22 PM
@Mitch And sibling is a relatively recent revival of an Old English term for relative or kinsman.
Thank heaven it was revived so we could use it in manipulating the HTML DOM.
What champagne do front-end coders drink? Why, DOM Perignon, of course!
 
2:57 PM
@Mitch Wow, not bad, all those surviving babies.
> Bijna 70 procent bloeddonoren heeft antistoffen tegen coronavirus
 
@Cerberus The Spanish Royal Academy says that the etymology for the cognate verb talar meaning to cut down (a tree) is ‘maybe’ Germanic robbing; specifically, "Quizá del germ. *tālōn; cf. a. al. ant. zâlôn 'robar, arrebatar'", while Wiktionary says that it is from "Old High German zālōn (“to steal, snatch”), from Proto-Germanic *tālōn, variant of *talō (“assessment, narration, calculation”)."
 
@tchrist Already 70 per cent of blood donors have antibodies against the virus here, at a vaccination rate of about 52%.
Amongst donores over 70, it's 90 per cent.
 
@Cerberus You have a previously-infected rate of three score and ten?!?!!?
 
@tchrist Most of the antibodies are the result of vaccination!
 
Oh good.
 
2:59 PM
So we don't need a vaccination rate of 80 per cent, or so it would seem.
One thing to consider is that blood donors are less likely to refuse vaccination, perhaps.
Another thing, though, is that they are also less likely to display risky behaviour and become infected with the virus.
@tchrist Related to tell?
I thought of that verb earlier.
 
@Cerberus I believe the thinking is that the nominal R₀ for SARS-CoV-2 variant Delta may require a figure closer to 80% than to 70%.
 
But that would suggest the Spanish word is unrelated to Latin talea, despite sources' saying that taille and taglia are from talea?
 
It does look like tally and tell, yes, if you go far enough back.
There does seem a skip in the record, but these are not historical dictionaries so it's hard to tell what the writers' thinking was.
 
@tchrist Right, but we're already at 70% with a vaccination rate of only 52% (of whom quite a few percentage points have been vaccinated too recently to have detectable antibodies, I should think).
 
So I don't know whether it's really from ta(g)lio; I would think so but can't trace.
 
3:03 PM
I have no idea either.
 
@Cerberus Being at 70% given 52% means... solve the algebraic equation to determine population something.
 
> EWN on Dutch/French taille: "afleiding van het ww. tailler (van stoffen) ‘snijden voor het maken van kleding’ [1160; TLF], ouder talier ‘in stukken snijden’ [950-1000], ontwikkeld uit Laatlatijn taliare ‘in stukken snijden, splijten’, oorspr. ‘snoeien, twijgen afsnijden’, afleiding van klassiek Latijn tālea ‘stokje, loot, twijg’, waarvan de verdere herkomst onbekend is, zie ook → detail".
@tchrist That's probably some complex estimation.
But I think it shouldn't be too hard to reach 80% antibodies in your country and mine even with refusants.
 
Today's word of the week is SCOTUS’s misdemeanant; cf felon.
 
Perhaps your country is already close to 80 per cent antibodies in fact.
Err, never mind, your vaccination rate is close to ours.
 
@tchrist there's a word for it
not 'misdemean-or'?
 
3:10 PM
@Cerberus Given how uneven the distribution is across our 330-odd million, applying a single mean to such a large geographic area risks hiding dangerous pockets of higher morbidity and mortality from popular view.
 
Yes, certainly.
The fourth wave they are talking about here, possibly expected in autumn/winter, will be in the Bible Belt.
Amongst clusters of the unvaccinated.
 
Same here.
 
Those are not very large numbers of people, but perhaps enough to still overburden hospitals.
 
Their tombstones will all read "In God he trusted".
 
And I am sure the Dutch people will not suffer yet another lockdown just to protect lunatics from themselves.
@tchrist If the grave diggers are not overburdened...
 
3:14 PM
Job: "Though he take my life, still shall I trust in Him."
 
faith is all they got
 
Is that a real quotation?
 
No, it's a translation. I'm very poor at ancient Hebrew.
 
I see.
It shows how crazy religions are.
You cannot believe in that stuff and still be 100% sane.
 
3:16 PM
It takes something away.
 
It's Job 13:15.
 
@Cerberus most everybody was a believer forever. and yet seemed mostly sane.
lots of people believe in wishing real hard brings them success at gambling
I mean, if you don't do the wishing hard enough, you only have yourself to blame.
 
Wishing real hard has only ever been demonstrated as being able to bring change in the world within, not in the world without.
"I shall please"
 
@tchrist The most literal translation seems to be: "Behold, He slays me—I do not wait!"
 
@Mitch Oh?
 
3:20 PM
So there's a lot there between 'I do not wait' and 'I will trust in him'
 
> He aquí, aunque me matare, en él esperaré; Empero defenderé delante de él mis caminos.
 
@tchrist not -my- translation... just another version at tbiblehub
 
"Behold, though he should kill me..." used the Spanish future subjunctive, which wasn't in Latin.
Vulgate may, or may not, be closer.
 
@tchrist the romance 'esperar' does show the connection. wait->hope-> trust
 
Yes.
"Estel".
 
3:22 PM
@Mitch I would say, they were less sane in as much as they believed those things.
 
@tchrist Job was originally... uh ... Hebrew? Aramaic? Look man, I wasn't there
 
@Mitch Aequally insane.
 
Tolkien was trying to show that sort of hope in Aragorn's birth name. It does not translate well into English.
 
@Cerberus Oh sure. I agree. Insanity.
but if everybody else is saying they see ghosts, people tend to g along with that even if they don't quite exactly see them themselves. like maybe they're colorblind whn every body is talking about red and green and stuff?
 
Vulgate said: Etiam si occiderit me, in ipso sperabo: verumtamen vias meas in conspectu ejus arguam.
 
3:24 PM
@tchrist But the imperfect subjunctive is commonly used as a substitute for future subjunctive in Latin. When you need to be really explicit, the future subjunctive can be rendered perphrastically, futurus sit.
 
So there's sperabo.
 
@Mitch Sure. But that still makes it less sane than not believing in ghosts.
 
@Cerberus Certainly.
 
it could be that the original hebrew has a word whose first meaning is 'wait' but also used for things like 'hope' and 'trust'
 
But I must take a shower and get ready for the barber.
What do you think of something like this, though without all the blow-drying?
 
3:26 PM
@Cerberus I'm having trouble navigating through all those negatives.
 
And without the facial hair.
 
@Cerberus Can the barber give you those smoldering eyes? If so, then totally recomended.
@Cerberus oh
 
@Mitch You don't mean you failed to understand what I didn't intend to disagree with?
 
@Cerberus uh...
 
@Cerberus Not sure exactly which tense/mood/voice occiderit is there. Feels subjunctive to me, or futurish. Active though.
 
3:27 PM
yes
 
@Mitch That will be a different shop.
@tchrist Future perfect.
Though the forms of future perfect and perfect subjunctive are mostly identical.
 
That's what I meant.
 
@tchrist Score is another word whose original meaning was cut.
 
Yeah.
 
3:28 PM
Yeah, you cut a stick to keep track of things.
Later!
 
@Mitch Please stop talking about colored people. White light is no longer many-colored light, but rainbow light!
I found another Stephen word: the surname Donophan.
 
> You know when it comes to racism, people say "I don't care if they're black, white, purple or green." Oh, hold on now. Purple or green? You gotta draw the line somewhere. To hell with purple people.
 
@Mitch So you side with the purple people eaters?
 
3:43 PM
@Robusto No because those guys -are- purple.
I'm not eating that
carrots? eating an orange thing? holy crap...out in the woods the only thing that is orange is some deadly fungus
 
@Mitch Barney wept.
 
Barney looks like he was using a clerical collar as dentures.
 
@Mitch Orioles. Rose hips. Slime molds.
 
@tchrist "Yellow flowers are all right I guess. don't get much out of them. but they don't kill you outright. perfectly tolerable." Holden Caulfield
 
3:48 PM
This was WAY more interesting than I initially imagined.
Damn, @Mitch, ya tweened me.
 
Careful there, Senator: sixteen'll getcha twenty.
 
@Robusto "You gotta tweet fast around here. If you don't stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it" Ferris Bueller
 
Rockin’ Robin, our Ferris.
 
@Robusto That guy is pretty good.
 
Yeah, surprisingly so.
That video was in my feed for like two weeks and wouldn't go away.
"No, really, you're going to love this!" it crooned.
 
3:51 PM
I now know how air conditioners and VCRs work because of him
 
'All useful skills.
 
@Robusto I'm not sure how those algorithms work. Very unclear.
@Robusto If only they could cook things for me.
that would be a useful skill
to find YT vids that cook for you.
 
Probably AlphaZero's hobby when not playing chess is organizing your YouTube feed.
 
Alphazero isn't that great at it.
 
It's just a hobby. Lighten up.
 
3:54 PM
thankfully I don't see all the Jordan Peterson/QAnon things that I hear people love
@Robusto Then why does he bring it out at parties?
 
Showing off.
If you knew how to organize YouTube feeds you'd probably be showing that off at parties, don't kid yourself.
 
Yay!!!!!!!!!!!!
I just used up a month's supply of exclamation points in one comment.
But it was worth it.
@tchrist That was so enjoyable it should have been in the entertainment section.
 
Hmm.
You didn't use any 1s nor ones.
So I'm not convinced.
 
I don't understand your confusion.
 
4:11 PM
Trees per person.
My dad took part in tree planting as a school pupil
 
How do they count the trees?
 
The Great Plan for the Transformation of Nature, also known as Stalin's plan for the transformation of nature, was proposed by Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union in the second half of the 1940s, for land development, agricultural practices and water projects to improve agriculture in the nation. Its propaganda motto and catchphrase was "the great transformation of nature" (великое преобразование природы, velikoye preobrazovaniye prirody).The plan was outlined in the Decree of the USSR Council of Ministers and All-Union Communist Party (Bolsheviks) Central Committee of October 20, 1948: "On the...
There was this general plan for planting trees in the USSR
I don't know whether this particular plan covered the part of Chelyabinsk Oblast where he lived though
 
@Robusto Why not!!11oneone!
 
@Mitch Maybe by satellite data?
 
@CowperKettle Hmm Nigeria and Uganda are disappointing.
 
4:16 PM
@Cerberus I think you are reaching the singularity all by yourself.
 
A singular undertaking
 
The Great Plains Shelterbelt was a project to create windbreaks in the Great Plains states of the United States, that began in 1934. President Franklin D. Roosevelt initiated the project in response to the severe dust storms of the Dust Bowl, which resulted in significant soil erosion and drought. The United States Forest Service believed that planting trees on the perimeters of farms would reduce wind velocity and lessen evaporation of moisture from the soil. By 1942, 220 million trees had been planted, covering 18,600 square miles (48,000 km2) in a 100-mile-wide zone from Canada to the Brazos...
 
We're back to Bad Air Days, or will be soon enough.
 
We're back to rainy days. The weekend will be cool and rainy.
 
It was 101 in Denver yesterday when I drove past. Today it's mostly cloudy and we're hoping for rain.
It's only 77 now, and shouldn't get much worse today.
 
4:24 PM
38 C! Amazing.
 
It was 46 one morning I woke up in Wisconsin. I didn't bring a jacket.
 
I wonder if this heat could be used to generate electricity.
18
Q: Can I take heat from the air and convert it to electricity?

billpgIts a summer day and the air in my house has been heated up. I could switch on my air conditioning, but then I'd be using energy from the grid in order to reduce the amount of energy in my house. What I'd much rather do is capture the heat energy from the air, so cooling it down, and turn that h...

 
@tchrist Yes. Though it looks clear here, the smoke swirls around us.
@CowperKettle Isn't that the idea of a heat pump?
 
You can make it cooler, but that's not the same thing.
An evaporative cooler (also evaporative air conditioner, swamp cooler, swamp box, desert cooler and wet air cooler) is a device that cools air through the evaporation of water. Evaporative cooling differs from other air conditioning systems, which use vapor-compression or absorption refrigeration cycles. Evaporative cooling uses the fact that water will absorb a relatively large amount of heat in order to evaporate (that is, it has a large enthalpy of vaporization). The temperature of dry air can be dropped significantly through the phase transition of liquid water to water vapor (evaporation)...
Swamp coolers work that way.
 
Swamp coolers are horrible.
 
4:30 PM
More horrible than nothing?
 
Maybe not.
But they're so far less than refrigerated cooling it isn't even funny.
 
Sure.
 
Plus they use water in copious amounts.
 
They can work without electricity.
 
I have solar, so that's not a problem.
Energy neutral.
 
4:32 PM
They use a swamp cooler at the visitor center in the lower part of Zion National Park, by the river. The air is dry, the river has water.
 
Well, you don't have to sleep at the visitor center there.
 
Man, I hate the smell of wildfire and the sound of helicopters in the morning.
 
Smells like ... defeat.
 
They keep flying over me. I don't know what's going on, because no fire is that close.
>. Visitor Center Features

Solar panels provide 30% of the buildings’ power
80% of the structure is lit through natural daylight
The most noticeable features are the cooling towers—like a big swamp cooler, they use only a minimal horse-power pump to circulate water through pads to cool air, which then naturally sinks and spills out into the lobby.
Landscaping & Irrigation (Outdoor shade structures & exhibits, native plants, retain existing trees to provide instant shade & aesthetic, historic ditch irrigation & river water system)
 
4:37 PM
> Japan’s emperor has voiced concern over the possible spread of coronavirus during the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, in an unexpected intervention in the debate over holding the Games in the middle of a pandemic.
 
@tchrist From what I hear, they raise the humidity, so you'll feel hotter at the same air temperature.
 
Since when does the Chrysanthemum Emperor ever say anything whatsoever?
 
!!
Oneone
That is a unicum, methinks.
And the death knell of the Olympics.
 
bad keming
 
Heh.
I do not think Japanese public opinion will stand defying the Emperor. Do you?
Young though he be.
 
4:39 PM
@Cerberus That was my read of it as well. Seems unheard of.
 
Quite!
 
You'd think a "Chrysanthemum Emperor" would be some Graeco-Roman golden-boy, but no.
 
The last time a Dutch monarch went against cabinet policy was probably around the War, when everything was in chaos.
Everyone likes flowers.
 
Monarchs just never say anything political in a constitutional democracy.
 
Only under the most exceptional of circumstances.
 
4:41 PM
Short of some existential threat.
 
It is like a bee's sting.
 
M.A.D.
 
Kind of.
 
But he's trying to save the homeland.
It causes him to lose prestige otherwise.
 
If public opinion, and segments of the élite, already support the same position, the King may give that extra push and prevail.
If he does not prevail, it will come back like a boomerang.
 
4:43 PM
@tchrist He's not the Chrysanthemum Emperor. He merely sits on the Chrysanthemum Throne. His real title is 天皇 (tennou), which means Emperor of Heaven, or something like it.
 
Am I thinking of some Chinese thing then?
 
Japanese public opinion already seemed set against the Olympics.
 
@Cerberus There are many powers in play here.
 
The Peacock Throne was a famous jewelled throne that was the seat of the emperors of the Mughal Empire in India. It was commissioned in the early 17th century by emperor Shah Jahan and was located in the Diwan-i-Khas (Hall of Private Audiences, or Ministers' Room) in the Red Fort of Delhi. It was named after a peacock as two peacocks are shown dancing at its rear. == History == Shah Jahan ruled in what is considered the Golden Age of the vast Mughal Empire, which covered almost all of the Indian subcontinent. He ruled from the newly constructed capital of Shahjahanabad. The emperor was the focus...
 
@tchrist I don't know. But the chrysanthemum is very important in Japanese tradition.
 
4:47 PM
I had thought the Dragon Emperor was called that because he sat on the Dragon Throne.
> The Dragon Throne is the term used to identify the throne of the Emperor of China. As the dragon was the emblem of divine imperial power, the throne of the emperor, who was considered a living god, was known as the Dragon Throne.[12] The term can refer to very specific seating, as in the special seating in various structures in the Forbidden City of Beijing or in the palaces of the Old Summer Palace. In an abstract sense, the "Dragon Throne" also refers rhetorically to the head of state and to the monarchy itself.[13] The Daoguang Emperor is said to have referred to his throne as "the div
 
@Robusto that seems a bit narcissistic
 
@Mitch He's humbler than, say, Donald Trump, I would think.
 
There's a lot of room there
 
> Chrysanthemum Throne of the Emperors of Japan
Phoenix Throne of the Kings of Korea
Lion Throne of the Dalai Lama of Tibet
Peacock Throne of the Mughal Empire
Peacock Throne of the Persian Empire
Sun Throne of the Persian Empire
Naderi Throne in Iran
 
And the Iron Throne of ... Robert Baratheon?
 
4:49 PM
The Iranians look like they got a few spares
 
You can never have too many thrones.
 
The Porcelain Throne
 
@Robusto Dancing on the head of a pin.
 
Praying to the Porcelain God
 
In Christian angelology, thrones (Ancient Greek: θρόνος, pl. θρόνοι; Latin: thronus, pl. throni) are a class of angels. This is based on an interpretation of Colossians 1:16. According to 1 Peter 3:21-22, Christ had gone to Heaven and "angels and authorities and powers" had been made subject to him.Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite includes the thrones as the third highest of 9 levels of angels. == Christian angelology == According to Matthew Bunson, the corresponding order of angels in Judaism is called the abalim or arelim/erelim, but this opinion is far from unrivaled. The Hebrew word erelim is...
@Mitch Slippery when wet.
 
4:51 PM
That just sounds like they're using the word wrong
 
The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor is a 2008 American action-adventure fantasy film, directed by Rob Cohen, written by Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and produced by Stephen Sommers (director of the first two films), Bob Ducsay, Sean Daniel, and James Jacks. The film is set in China, departing from the Egyptian setting, and focuses on the Terracotta Army's origins. It is the third and final installment in The Mummy trilogy and stars Brendan Fraser, Jet Li, Maria Bello, John Hannah, Luke Ford, Anthony Wong, and Michelle Yeoh. The Mummy: Tomb of the Dragon Emperor premiered in Moscow on July 24...
@Mitch Hebrew is often wackily translated.
> According to Matthew Bunson, the corresponding order of angels in Judaism is called the abalim or arelim/erelim,[4] but this opinion is far from unrivaled. The Hebrew word erelim is usually not translated "thrones", but rather "valiant ones", "heroes", or "warriors".[citation needed] The function ascribed to erelim in Isaiah 33:7 and in Jewish folklore[5] is not consistent with the lore surrounding the thrones.
 
Wacky is right. I may have to question the bible translations then
 
In Dragaera, there is currently a Phoenix Emperor, but a reborn phoenix not a decadent phoenix like the previous emperor. The next emperor will be a Dragon Emperor. But all sit upon the Phoenix Throne created by the first empress.
The 17 dynasties rotate in holding the throne.
The 17 great houses. It's cool.
It stays within the same house unless the Cycle has moved on. Which often enough, it does.
 
Word of the day: thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness questionnaire
 
A bunch of crazy space aliens tinkered with the human genome to create the "improved" Dragaerans. Their plan was to make them super-static and unchanging. They created the circle of 17 so it would be always recurring. Each house they mixed a bit of some creature's DNA into.
@CowperKettle ick
 
5:00 PM
The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture is a 1946 study of Japan by American anthropologist Ruth Benedict. It was written at the invitation of the U.S. Office of War Information, in order to understand and predict the behavior of the Japanese in World War II by reference to a series of contradictions in traditional culture. The book was influential in shaping American ideas about Japanese culture during the occupation of Japan, and popularized the distinction between guilt cultures and shame cultures.Although it has received harsh criticism, the book has continued to b...
Required reading for an introduction to Japanese culture.
It has its problems, but the book is still extremely influential.
 
I don't know the difference between guilt and shame. I feel bad about that.
 
When you show up to school unbottomed, you are guiltless, merely ashamed.
 
 
2 hours later…
6:50 PM
Word of the day: vermillion border
Turns out cats have rhinarium
> The rhinarium is a separate sense organ: it is a touch-based chemosensory organ that connects with a well-developed vomeronasal organ (VNO).
And we only have the vestigial philtrum that serves no purpose.
 
@CowperKettle Philtrum serves a purpose: to be used in trivia games. :)
 
 
3 hours later…
9:35 PM
how do you make the indoors cooler so that you can study well?
outside is thundering, so it's cool,
but you cannot make inside feel the same as outside in hotness.
 
10:23 PM
@Bohemianrelativist You need a portable, electronically-powered air-conditioning unit to place in the window. Barring that, you need a big box fan to do the same with.
You should also wear as little clothing as you or those around you can tolerate so that the fan blows across your body to create cooling through the loss of heat of evaporation of sweat.
Electric box fans sized to fit in an open window are not expensive to acquire or to operate.
 
I got this one.
Room unit is not possible.
 
10:42 PM
@tchrist if you are a nomad, buying any facility is a waste because you can carry it via airplane.
I have an electric fan which is new in my original home which is in Asia, but I can't carry it here.
I started to use that electric fan just several months before I left that home.
I moved to another city, but I can carry that electric fan with me. Fortunately when I lived in that city, the landlord lent me a electric fan. When I moved out of that house, I left that electric fan in that house.
 
I'm sorry. Can you afford a very small electric fan rather than a window fan?
 
now I am here, a country I am not familiar with its culture. I don't know why they don't have electric fan or air conditioner in office or dorm. In my original country, either of these is necessary facilities of a house.
in that place, there is no heater, but all houses have either electric fan or air conditioner.
here there is heater in every house, but there is no electric fan or air conditioner, but the summer here isn't less hot.
 

« first day (3878 days earlier)      last day (32 days later) »