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2:41 AM
Word of the morning: creode - a valley in the epigenetic landscape that guides an organism on its path during ontogenesis.
 
A valley?
 
Creode or chreod is a neologistic portmanteau term coined by the English 20th century biologist C. H. Waddington to represent the developmental pathway followed by a cell as it grows to form part of a specialized organ. Combining the Greek roots for "necessary" and "path," the term was inspired by the property of regulation. When development is disturbed by external forces, the embryo attempts to regulate its growth and differentiation by returning to its normal developmental trajectory. == Developmental biology == Waddington used the term along with canalisation and homeorhesis, which describes...
 
3:08 AM
Ah, that h is necessary.
We don't say Crist!
@CowperKettle Smart embryo.
 
3:33 AM
@Cerberus Because the Greek word has "h" in it? What is this word?
I came across the genetic term canalization in an article about schizophrenia and whence upon creode nature.com/articles/tp201116
 
@CowperKettle Yes.
Praesumably chrê, root chre-.
With hodos "way".
 
Thank you!
> It is made from the Greek roots chre, meaning "it is necessary," and hodos, meaning "route or path." Chreode can be defined as "the path of what must be." Nature seeks this path always, as it is the most stable, requires the lowest amount of energy, and presents is the least resistance to development along its way.
 
3:50 AM
It makes sense.
Although I'm not sure whether the word is properly formed.
Maybe.
 
 
4 hours later…
7:32 AM
 
8:03 AM
In the first 8 months of 2021, a total of 614 thousand marriages were registered in Russia, and 428 thousand divorces.
 
 
2 hours later…
9:41 AM
Current weather. +8C
 
 
3 hours later…
12:54 PM
if 13 is unlucky, are all numbers after 13 unlucky, too? 13.1 is just 13 + 0.1, 17 is just 13+4. Don't all numbers above 13 have an innate 13-ness?
is 169 1/13th as unlucky as 13?
 
I agree.
Everything i sunlucky.
 
> Sandworm Cinnamon Bun, traditional food on Arrakis
 
Festive.
 
@Cerberus only things over 13 are unlucky.
13 or over*
limit all tower blocks to up to 12 floors
 
1:11 PM
@CowperKettle I don't want these Arrakis coming over here, imposing their Shai-Hulud law
 
1:35 PM
@MattE.Эллен Your point is solid but people just aren't woke enough to get it. Anything 13 or above they should be very worried.
I mean 12 is totally safe, but I start to get jitters around 10.
 
2:02 PM
@Mitch Right? at someone point people have to realise that any number is just 13 plus another number
 
2:18 PM
Titanium hip implant after a person's cremation
I'd like to be cremated, in order not to take up land area in the form of a grave.
 
2:55 PM
@CowperKettle They should redo 2001: A Space Odyssey, where the chimps throw -that- into space.
 
3:20 PM
> It is estimated the Great Famine of 1695–1697 killed 15–25% of the population in present-day Scotland, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Norway, and Sweden, plus another two million in France and Northern Italy.
Covid is peanuts, comparatively
The seven ill years was a period of national famine in Scotland in the 1690s. It resulted from extreme cold weather, an economic slump created by French protectionism and changes in the Scottish cattle trade, followed by four years of failed harvests (1695, 1696 and 1698–99). The result was severe famine and depopulation, particularly in the north. The 1690s were Scotland's coldest decade in the past 750 years as documented in tree ring records. The famines of the 1690s were seen as particularly severe, partly because famine had become relatively rare in the second half of the seventeenth century...
 
 
1 hour later…
4:42 PM
> "Using both mouse and human population, we found that the female's adipose tissue, or fat tissue, had more mitochondria than the male fat tissue," says Chella Krishnan. medicalxpress.com/news/…
 
5:04 PM
Because I'm moving out, my roommates have started to accuse me of removing or using their belongings. This includes small things like using their soy sauce or moving a muffin pan. What word matches how I have no "malicious" intent to them and their items.
Malicious seems a bit too vivid.
They're just afraid I'm acting in bad faith... even though none of these actions are real in the first place.
Maybe that's what I'm looking for: not acting in bad faith.
 
5:21 PM
@adamaero That sounds appropriate?
They are being petty.
And paranoid.
 
5:33 PM
Weird
My amylase has been chronically elevated, but very mildly, just above the upper limit, so I googled for "amylase in athletes"
I asked the doctor if the elevation might come from me running every day. She said no, there must be no elevation above the limit. And sent me to an MRI to check my pancreas.
 
5:52 PM
Word of the day: Plexus vascular barrier (a new structure allegedly discovered in the brain's choroid plexus science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abc6108)
It's amazing that some structures may have remained undiscovered yet.
 
6:36 PM
@Cerberus I can't say that to them though.
 
Yeah.
 
I'm just trying to let them know I'm not doing anything nefarious
/pertinacious
Those words just seem to go beyond what I'm trying to express
Once in a debate, I used "nothing sinister" to describe what I meant by something. My opponent got hung up on the word sinister.
 
You already said "not acting in bad faith".
If that is what you want to say?
 
I think so.
 
Good.
 
 
4 hours later…
10:45 PM
Another day, another comment under my "Learn Russian in 1 minute" video informing me that "That's way too simplified".
No shit, Sherlock.
You click on a video in the hopes of acquiring a whole entire language in just one minute, and you expect it to not simplify a thing or two.
Millennials.
 
@RegDwigнt Sounds like you're a big influencer.
By the way, how do you feel about her accent?
I really like her performance.
Despite the words that are occasionally pronounced oddly.
And despite the botox.
 

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