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12:37 AM
Spooky clouds on Sandía tonight.
Almost like a UFO.
 
12:54 AM
I have very strong inertia - I am reluctant to go to sleep though it's 1:54 am now and I am sleepy.
 
1:08 AM
Perhaps it is the spirit of Trumpism returning to its weird plane of existence.
 
@Cerberus If so, it's going in the wrong direction.
 
Perhaps it is now homeless.
 
How ironic, considering Trumpism's treatment of asylum seekers.
 
just solved a math issue concerning the left inverse and right inverse of a function and am going to study physics the coming day.
 
1:19 AM
Crazy people are seldom consistent.
 
the dormitory administration is not consistent.
 
Crazy people are dangerous.
 
from the begging of my moving in.
I dreamt of walking together with some people who look like my junior high school classmates when I slept from over 7: 30 pm to 10: 30 pm.
now I am going to sleep again.
though I feel reluctant but I am sleepy and there is a course at 8:30 am.
 
1:39 AM
Quite.
 
 
2 hours later…
3:41 AM
A Russian guy in TikTok lampoons Putin's "drive-in" cangaroo court held in a police station over Navalny, under Putin's beckoning. The guy walks across the city, enters barber shops and supermarkets in a judge's gown with a mallet, and asks if he can hold a court session right there, because "now it's how it's done". twitter.com/alexsandrova888/status/1352341767471947778
Admirable.
@Bohemianrelativist Yay!
 
but yeah, that is admirable
 
4:08 AM
There's the Pearson syndrome and there's the Pierson syndrome, but in Russian they both are Синдром Пирсона
 
 
4 hours later…
8:31 AM
 
@Xanne What do nuns actually do? It's one of many things I've wondered about.
I've watched "The Sound of Music", but that suggests nuns spend their time singing Rodgers and Hammerstein in four-part harmony, and foiling Nazis. That seems somewhat lacking as a career path.
 
9:03 AM
Policemen are forbidden to live Yekaterinburg on 23 January e1.ru/news/spool/news_id-69716371.html
The f**er is afraid
 
9:19 AM
@CowperKettle if it's any solace, there are only so many Pearson's in science. And then you have Hofmann, Hoffmann, Hoffman, . . .
 
 
2 hours later…
11:38 AM
-22°С today
I could not feel my toes after the run, for about 10 minutes. Now they are red and hot.
 
12:19 PM
Now they are fine.
Whew
> - A million seconds is 12 days.
- A billion seconds is 31 years.
- A trillion seconds is 31,688 years
 
1:07 PM
Vande Bharat Express, also known as Train 18, is an Indian higher-speed rail intercity electric multiple unit. It was designed and built by Integral Coach Factory (ICF) at Perambur, Chennai under the Indian government's Make in India initiative over a span of 18 months. The unit cost of the first rake was given as ₹1 billion (US$14 million), though the unit cost is expected to go down with subsequent production. At the original price, it is estimated to be 40% cheaper than a similar train imported from Europe. The train was launched on 15 February 2019, by which date a second unit will have been...
Cool. Up to 130 km/h and fully domestically-built. And to top that, the Indian gauge is 15 cm wider than the Russian (1520 mm) gauge.
That must allow for wider carriages, spacier and more comfortable.
I wonder what the wall-to-wall width of Indian train carriages compared with Russian is.
Word of the day: rake (rail transport) a set of coupled rail vehicles, normally coaches or wagons
 
> So, a major Space Shuttle design feature of what is arguably the world's most advanced transportation system was determined over two thousand years ago by the width of a horse's arse.

Source https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/the-link-between-a-horses-arse-and-the-space-shuttle.162604/
 
 
1 hour later…
no beverage now.
how nice if someone can help me go buy some.
today in English class, I saw a student wear a NASA T-shirt through his camera. He said he does research about observing black holes.
When I was a child, I admired NASA, but now I admire institutes concerned with theoretical physics more, like Perimeter institute.
some principal investigator in France I contacted suggested me to contact his colleagues at Perimeter Institute. I have long known there are very interesting research topics conducted at Perimeter Institute, but keeping not applying there. I think I would have applied there if I was not admitted here.
seeking a position is a long struggle filled with hardship.
it's very absurd that the landlord can sit there charging our money without much effort and even overcharge us for when we didn't occupy their land.
I also study black holes but only do it theoretically.
2
 
3:15 PM
Russia's time zones
The word "zone" used to mean "belt"
> Her tapered fingers too with rings are graced,
And an embroidered zone surrounds her slender waist.
 
@CowperKettle And a woman's belt at that.
> Originally one of the five great divisions of the earth's surface (torrid, temperate, frigid; separated by tropics of Cancer and Capricorn and Arctic and Antarctic circles); meaning "any discrete region" is first recorded 1822.
And now we even have the "friend zone."
 
3:31 PM
today the English test result is announced, I only get 15.5 out 26 points, just the score to pass.
 
3:56 PM
@Xanne Nice. MGH area.
Lenticular clouds (Latin: Lenticularis lentil-shaped, from lenticula lentil) are stationary clouds that form mostly in the troposphere, typically in perpendicular alignment to the wind direction. They are often comparable in appearance to a lens or saucer. Nacreous clouds that form in the lower stratosphere sometimes have lenticular shapes. There are three main types of lenticular clouds: altocumulus standing lenticular (ACSL), stratocumulus standing lenticular (SCSL), and cirrocumulus standing lenticular (CCSL), varying in altitude above the ground. Because of their unique appearance, they have...
@tchrist All those names remind me of the maps that come with 'The Gallic Wars'. It's weird that they all must have had boat culture to get to the island and then eventually moved inland and forgot all that.
 
@Mitch Not much need for boats in Britain: have you ever tried to count up their lakes?
 
@Robusto The coldest one of all
 
Several years ago a Russia policeman killed a man right during interrogation, in his office in the police station, at point-blank range by a shot in the head. He explained that he was "cleaning the pistol" at that moment, and received an easy sentence.
 
4:17 PM
I've been keeping tabs on covid deaths in Israel, but they are higher and higher.
I thought that roughly after Jan 20 deaths should start going down.
 
@Mitch Crafty constructs of ferryland don't count.
 
@CowperKettle 1) It takes a month after the vaccine to develop the most protection 2) variants of covid not protected from by the vaccine?
@tchrist also very modern.
 
Russian State Duma deputy managed to vote for 8 legislative bills on the day of his death from covid, and during a coma at that.
 
@Mitch Ever wonder why there are so few lakes in Tolkien’s Legendarium?
 
@tchrist lack of imagination?
 
4:23 PM
Or why hobbits mistrust boating so very much?
 
eventually they had a great navy
but so did all the other European colonists to be.
 
That is the call of the sea.
> “Lakes are local drainage problems,” is a geomorphologist joke that is absolutely hilarious if you spend most of your time modeling sediment transport.
 
but my point is, and a very dul one at that, is that whoever is visiting the Island across the channel had a deep boat knowledge (or were -really- annoyed by their continental neighbors, but then they get there and then they move inland and forget about boats.
 
@Mitch Yes, must be that, sadly.
The Urals has quite a lot of lakes, but nowthere near as many as Siberia
 
Or the coastal tribe gets a bit largish and some subgroup's leader gets annoyed with the main leader and so moves off.
 
4:28 PM
The Kola Peninsula is a real land of lakes
 
But there are not real mountains in England, which is why there had to be so many in Middle Earth.
 
There are somewhy many lakes in Chelyabinsk Oblast
 
@Mitch Upon their arrival to the emerald isle, the Tuatha Dé Danann put their ships to the torch.
 
4:31 PM
The English tend to over-compensate in their fantasy literature, sometimes.
 
A close-up of Chelyabinsk Oblast
 
@CowperKettle Wow, it looks like it must be a beautiful region.
 
This is the town of Ozyorsk (Озерск), with ozero meaning lake in Russian. Hence, "a town of lakes"
 
So many nooks and crannies to explore.
 
@CowperKettle The puddled bones of dead glaciers.
Or, if you prefer, the ancient ice shield.
Many kettles and moraines.
 
4:34 PM
This is my temporary abode, since c. 2000.
Puerto Octay
 
Cool!
 
@CowperKettle Ozyorsk, must be a bit like "Entrelagos" in the upper right quadrant of this map
literally, "between lakes".
 
> The warmest month is January with an average maximum temperature of 20°C (68°F). The coldest month is August with an average maximum temperature of 11°C (51°F).
Looks like heaven.
 
@Conrado Oh that's right, your austral mountain lakes lie to the left of their ranges not to the east.
Britain has next to zero lakes that are called "lake".
 
The only thing I know about Chile is that it's where Salvador Alliende was.
I had a book with his photo when I was a kid.
 
4:38 PM
For neither water nor mere, nor loch nor llyn, will be written using the word lake.
 
@tchrist Yes, at least when I'm looking North. :)
On the other side is Patagonia proper.
Great windswept stretches of brown grass, most of the year.
 
@Conrado All the better to "nortearte", as the Portuguese say. (Yes, they have norteate to go with orientate, or however that works out in English.)
Old maps were oriented. They had the east side pointing up.
3
Our new maps are norteated, or whatever.
We have no word for this in English.
 
> So shakes the needle, and so stands the pole,
As vibrates my fond heart to my fix'd soul.
 
The damp air coming from the Pacific drops most of it's moisture as it is forced over the mountain range, I think.
 
> Significado de Nortear
v.t.
1. Guiar, conduzir ou dirigir para norte;
2. (Figurado) Orientar ou direcionar;
3. Regular ou controlar;

v.pron.
4. Orientar-se ou dirigir-se.
(Etm. norte + ear)
 
4:48 PM
@tchrist It is newer than "orientar-se", I take it?
 
to 'norteate' isn't as awful sounding as 'orientate'
 
@tchrist I didn't know about east-facing maps. immediately begins speculating about sunrise and stuff.
From my provincial view, the North pole isn't quite as obvious as the sun's apparent path from east to west.
 
@Conrado Newer than septentrionalizar. :)
 
@Conrado Found it on Google Maps without Googling!
Just zooming and scrolling.
 
@Cerberus Cool, that was fast!
 
4:52 PM
I just looked at Spanish-speaking westcoasts.
Took just a minute or two.
Fun game.
 
Ah of course!
 
I immediately thought Chile even before looking, but I started in Iberia anyway.
 
Everything is magic until you give away the data :)
 
@Mitch Blaaah.
@Conrado When science is advanced enough, it will seem like magic.
 
@Conrado I honestly don't know. I don't have any good reference works for tracing the history of when words entered Portuguese. dicionario.priberam.org/nortear
But norte is from Germanic.
Which was my point about septentrional.
The Iberian cardinal directions are Germanic imports today.
 
4:58 PM
Such a tragedy.
 
> Attested since the 14th century. Borrowed from Middle French nord, from Old English norþ, from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą.
 
One wonders why they didn't have shorter words.
French borrowed nord from English??
What a day.
 
> From Middle French, from Old French norht, north, nort (“north”), from Old English norþ (“north”), from Proto-Germanic *nurþrą (“north”), from Proto-Indo-European *ner- (“lower, bottom; to sink, shrivel”).
> From Middle French sud, from Old French su, sud (“south”), from Old English sūþ (“south”), from Proto-Germanic *sunþrą. More at south.
> Borrowed from French ouest, from Middle French ouest, from Old French ouest or west, from Old English west, from Proto-Germanic *westrą.
> From French l'est, from Old English ēast.
> Borrowed from French est, from Old English ēast, from Proto-Germanic *austrą (“east”), from Proto-Indo-European *aus- (“eastern”).
So not just in Iberia alone, but also in Gaul.
And in Italy itself.
> Nord: it derives from the Spanish word “norte” and from the English word “north”.
Sud: it derives from the English word “sun”, it is related to the highest position of the sun on the horizont.
Ovest: in English is “west” and in French is “ouest”. In Italian is “ovest” because a wrong reading had transformed the “u” in “v”.
Est: it is the point in which the sun rises. It derives from the Indo-european word “ausos” and from the Greek word “eos” which means “dawn”.
@Cerberus I, too, wish I knew how all this came to happen to Romance.
Perhaps it was an occident. :)
> The names of the cardinal points derive from the Dutch language and its mythology: on the cardinal points there were four dwarfs: Norõri (north), Suõri (south), Austri (east) and Vestri (west).
Ahah! South is the sister to North! :)
But West is merely East's jacket.
has not studied "Dutch mythology"
 
@tchrist Est is from Greek? Really?
 
@Cerberus I doubt that. I think it is via a cognate.
 
5:12 PM
That is what it says, though.
But the language already suggests less than academic rigour.
 
The OED tells a tale longer than a pamphet's easy compass.
> Origin: A word inherited from Germanic.
Etymology: Cognate with Old Frisian āst , ēst , ōst , also āsta , āste , noun (West Frisian east , oast ), Middle Dutch oost (adverb) in the east, to the east, from the east, (adjective) eastern, in or to the east, (noun) the east (in Old Dutch only in place names, and in northost , suthost ; Dutch oost ), Middle Low German ōst (adverb) to the east, (adjective) eastern, to the east, from the east, in the east, ōst , ōste , noun, Old High German ōst (adverb) in the east, Middle High German ōst , noun, and probably also Old Icelandic aust- as the firs
 
> Terme d'orig. germanique, empr., d'abord en Normandie d'où il est passé dans l'usage des autres régions, au vieil angl. norpb att. dep. le IXe s. (FEW t.16, p.601b; NED).
The TLF.
 
Yeah look at that.
 
So it was borrowed in Normandy.
 
Darned French vikings.
 
5:14 PM
But why Italy and Iberia, too??
 
no clue
> The English word was borrowed early into French: French est (12th cent. in Anglo-Norman); subsequently also (probably via French) Spanish este (1492 as leste ), Portuguese este , leste (both 15th cent.), Italian est (1561).
 
And why didn't French already have established words for terms so very important as the cardinal directions, not even by the s.xii??
 
Oh that I knew.
 
Had it been borrowed from Frankish/Gothic in the 6th century, that would have made more sense. But this?
Philippa simply says "< pgm. *nurþa-" about Dutch noord.
So at least Dutch didn't borrow from English.
 
Are people in India having these etymology discussions about cardinal directions in Sanskrit derivatives? -in- Marathi?
I need to know.
Pretty quickly. TIA.
I have to catch a plane.
free wifi about to go out
and if I don't find out my answer
before the plane takes off
and I lose airport wifi
then there are some
things about my
life that will
become
hard
 
5:26 PM
@Mitch Is it a B-2?
 
Or if you like you can answer the same question about varieties of Chinese on the WeChat channel
except no one in China acknowledges that there is anything other than standard Mandarin.
so I don't expect an answer for them.
@Conrado Boeing 737 Max
or is it 'MAX'
checks safety card in pouch on back of seat in front of me
It's MAX
that's a bit pretentious
 
Yes, but they are Boeing.
 
if they're going to capitalize they might as well go all out and add an exclamation point.
and put it in Comic Sans
 
They can't help being pretentious, perhaps.
 
and rainbow colored foreground
scratch and sniff lavendar?
 
5:30 PM
Word-Art.
 
what is that font... twiddles? zapf chancery? Ding Dongs?
Wing Dings!
Does that still exist?
 
Lol...
 
emojis might as well replace them
 
In case you were unsure, no I'm not on a plane, or on my way to a plane or even thinking of a plane. I'm right here in my chair like I've always been.
 
5:32 PM
I'm surprised such small creatures can survive in the open air when it's -20 in the afternoon.
 
Sometimes on a couch multitasking watching TV word for friends on my phone and eating cake
@Cerberus pigeons - the rats of the air
They seem like fairly innocuous birds.
One time sitting in a park surrounded by pigeons seeing them up close they got a lot going on - miscolorings, strange growths on their legs, missing toes, missing feet, misshaped wings. lots of mis-everything. Like a good aged Rocquefort, don't look at them too closely.
 
@Mitch Indeed.
I was told the reason of their missing toes, but I forgot.
I think it was some kind of growth defect.
Something horrible at any rate.
Also Omsk.
-20.
 
@Cerberus poor circulation? metal grating in train stations?
 
Maybe it was pollution.
Okay, from what I read, it is probably pollution by humans that is the greatest factor.
Research also found that there are more missing toes near barber shops.
Why do you think that is?
 
5:43 PM
Yekaterinburg, today
 
Researchers found that many pigeons had human hair stuck around their feet.
 
> Most early maps, before the wide-spread use of the compass, placed east at the top. This is generally thought to be due to the fact that the sun rises in the east. It was the most consistent directional maker.
@Cerberus "Hitchcock was here!"
 
So it is thought that, when their toes get stuck in human hair, it can cut off circulation, causing their toes to amortise.
In fact, that seems to be the conclusion.
 
Well, mortify even.
There's little enough interest involved. :)
 
I preferred a more exotic reference!
 
5:45 PM
necrotize
 
Amazingly, there are bicyclists at minus 22°C. I met several of them today.
 
So the barber shops are not the only reason; it's also other kinds of pollution (it happens mainly or only to urban pigeons). But hair is one factor. And there is human hair everywhere in city streets.
 
@CowperKettle Well, that's much warmer here. :)
 
@CowperKettle I remember cycling to school at -17, leaving before dawn. It was about 45 minutes.
 
In my experience, when it's lower than minus 20C, the shifting of gears becomes a very long process. You press the lever, and it may take 30 seconds for the bike to shift.
 
5:47 PM
8 below is less awful when the sun is high, which, of course, it is not.
 
I probably didn't have gears!
Not the ones you can shift.
 
@CowperKettle Salt water freezes when it's that cold.
 
And one has to wear a mask or glasses, because the cold air really gets your face during bicycling.
Tomorrow it will hit minus 30°C
 
@Mitch Those boats are everywhere here, also in the inner cities.
@CowperKettle I think I wore only a hat and a scarf.
But -17 is better than -22.
Although it was still night.
-30 is yet a different kind of cold, so I imagine.
 
I'm thinking of wearing special heavy Arctic boots. I bought them to climb mountain Konzhakovsky Kamen three years back.
 
5:53 PM
Good idea.
 
@Cerberus Venice is the Amsterdam of the south
 
Indeed.
 
@Cerberus OK you got me. That's gross.
 
But it's basically everywhere in the entire country.
@Mitch Victory!
 
I am very uncomfortable riding a bike when it's less that 15C.
So all this talk of -22 sounds like you're talking about a different planet
 
5:56 PM
They are very heavy, with thick soles
 
@Cerberus haha. but really. i feel bad for them, but they look like they get by OK, and also it's disgusting.
@CowperKettle wait...for bike riding?
 
@Mitch No, for walking ))
 
oh
cool
makes more sense
with thick wool socks
 
google.com/maps/place/Prinsengracht+12,+8607+AD+Sneek/… Like here, a random town, whose name first came to mind.
 
or mutliple socks
 
5:58 PM
@Mitch Quite.
 
@Cerberus I wonder why there is no Google Channel View for the Netherlands, like Street View
It would have been easy to make a boat float on all the channels and make photos
So neat and clean that it reminds me of the Moscow Kremlin, when you go inside, there is a similar level of neatness
 
7:00 PM
Is there a good soul who wants to review my university my application? :)
my university application*
 
user489849
7:47 PM
Hello, I think I've found an error on english.stackexchange.com/conduct that exists across SE sites. In Enforcement > Warning, shouldn't For most first-time misconduct be For most first-time misconducts? Also, could someone explain if it's for the first offense, the first flag received of each kind, the first flag on every post, or something else? The error amplified the ambiguity.
 
@niamulbengali What are misconducts?
I suppose an incompetent conductor misconducts his orchestra.
We do not perceive bad conduct to be countable.
There's is no such thing as a code of conducts.
So there is no error.
As for the rest of your question, the answer is that it's decided by a human not a computer.
 
user489849
8:05 PM
Makes sense. This was insightful. Especially the last part: I didn't know it's an algorithm at work.
 
user489849
Well, I seem to have misinterpreted the last part completely. My bad. I have gotten a moderator message before and was processing how that could be. It's all clear now.
 
8:25 PM
@CowperKettle Oh, that is pretty normal here. We are ruled by the petite-bourgeoisie.
Although I suppose that street pavement is somewhat new.
@CowperKettle You sometimes end up on a boat when you click somewhere in Street View!
@niamulbengali Yeah, that is just a message from a human.
Just try to do what it suggests.,
 
8:51 PM
@Conrado That is called orographic rain. As the air rises it cools, and eventually drops its moisture.
 
9:10 PM
@Robusto Oro "of the mountains"; graphic "drawing": It is rain from the shape (drawing) of the mountains!
 
Indeed. It mostly happens in countries like yours and places like the West Coast of the US, where moisture-laden winds off the ocean are pushed inland and up steep mountains.
 
I think that the lenticular clouds form the same way: the saturation point temperature changes, and violá! the cloud becomes visible as it's moisture condenses.
Sometimes such a cloud stays in one place, like a hat, for a long time, and it seems like tail end of it is stretched out by the wind.
 
Could be.
 
I wonder if the droplets are vaporizing on the downwind side again, becoming invisible again?
Other times, after the cloud forms, the wind carries it off whole!
 
I don't know. Maybe they are warming up.
 
@Conrado Is that real? It looks like a painting.
@Conrado So it does warm and that's why the cloud disappears on the other side of the mountain.
 
Well, I can't vouch for that particular picture, but I've often seen similar at Volcán Osorno, which is peculiarly suited to this formation.
 
Beautiful mountain.
 
It seems that they form when the wind is steady, creating a smooth flow over whatever formation is beneath. The clouds look like fog used in wind tunnels to show the airflow paths.
@Robusto Yes, it is sometimes called the Mt. Fuji of S. America.
 
You get some whopper earthquakes down your way, don't you?
 
9:21 PM
Because of its nice cone.
 
@Conrado Are we under attack?
 
@Robusto Personally, I've only experienced what they said was about 6 on the Richter scale.
 
I've seen that you get some that are 10 and over.
That is catastrophic.
 
Yes, my friends from a little further north laugh at us with our tremors.
In 2010, about 600 km north of us, there was a catastrophic one.
 
Considering that in 1810 three level 8.1 earthquakes in Missouri caused the Mississippi river to run backwards. People thought it was Judgment Day.
So I can't imagine a 10.
 
9:25 PM
Yes, it becomes apocalyptic after 7 or 8 even in supposedly prepared places.
In Talcahuano, these fishing boats were washed up on a principal street running along the waterfront.
This was one of the iconic images of that year, shown in all the newspapers.
 
That's not good.
At least they didn't collapse?
 
The building was almost new, I think.
Eight people died.
I took part in a temporary housing project, and saw these images in person.
They are definitely impressive.
 
Most tragic, to be sure.
But there could have been hundreds dead if the building had collapsed.
 
9:42 PM
Yes.
 
@Conrado It's the Ring of Fire.
I think they had a 10 in Alaska in 1964.
Ah, it was only a 9.2.
"Only."
The 1964 Alaskan earthquake, also known as the Great Alaskan earthquake and Good Friday earthquake, occurred at 5:36 PM AKST on Good Friday, March 27. Across south-central Alaska, ground fissures, collapsing structures, and tsunamis resulting from the earthquake caused about 131 deaths.Lasting four minutes and thirty-eight seconds, the magnitude 9.2 megathrust earthquake remains the most powerful earthquake recorded in North American history, and the second most powerful earthquake recorded in world history. Six hundred miles (970 km) of fault ruptured at once and moved up to 60 ft (18 m), releasing...
 
> Two hundred miles (320 km) southwest, some areas near Kodiak were permanently raised by 30 feet (9 m). Southeast of Anchorage, areas around the head of Turnagain Arm near Girdwood and Portage dropped as much as 8 feet (2.4 m), requiring reconstruction and fill to raise the Seward Highway above the new high tide mark.
Wow.
 
Hope I never witness anything like that.
Mejor dicho, no quiero estar cerca de eso.
 
> Lenticular, or lee wave, clouds form downwind of an obstacle in the path of a strong air current. In the Boulder, Colorado area, the obstacle is the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains, seen at the bottom of the picture. Wind blows most types of clouds across the sky, but lenticular clouds seem to stay in one place. Air moves up and over a mountain, with the lenticular cloud forming just past the mountaintop.

The cloud evaporates on the downwind side, so it appears stationary even though air is moving through the cloud. Lenticular clouds are lens-shaped and often look like flying saucers.
We seem to get them constantly here.
 
10:02 PM
It´s usually not moist enough for them to form here.
Lo que pasa es que no hay suficiente humedad en el aire.
 
"bastante" is more run of the mill
 
tomo notas
Last night was an exception, though.
22 hours ago, by Robusto
user image
 
10:20 PM
It's cloud art. I hope you never lose your sense of wonder...
 
@Conrado If I've made it this far, I think it will keep on to the rest of my days.
 
 
1 hour later…
11:36 PM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Offensive answer detected, potentially bad keyword in answer (79): How common is the word "trousers" in American English? by Will G on english.SE
 

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