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1:38 AM
@RegDwigнt: ^
This is pretty funny. I would add a ninth level, though: knowing the part cold, including all cues, so that you just feel it
Of course, you have to count like a fiend if you're sight-reading. The trick is to never be sight-reading.
At least not in front of a conductor. If you can help it.
Otherwise? Count.
And you have a guarantee working here: whenever you count through twelve bars of strings sans woodwinds/brass, the conductor is guaranteed to stop right on your cue and say "OK, strings, let's take it from C again."
 
 
5 hours later…
6:53 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Blacklisted website in answer, potentially bad ns for domain in answer (94): White Noise: Why White? by rayan Smith on english.SE
 
 
5 hours later…
12:13 PM
"So it's not wrong, it's the right answer to a different question" - love it! - think I might challenge myself to use this phrase more often! — Thomas Kimber Apr 27 '16 at 7:50
 
12:50 PM
Haha, Tantacrul is now Head of Development at MuseScore.
Too bad I won't benefit from any of the improvements he initiates, because I'm stuck with using the old version, because the new one simply won't run on 32-bit.
 
HATS!!!
What is going on? Why do I see hats?

From December 9th through January 1st, you'll be able to earn hats all over the sites! Ask, answer, vote, edit, and chat, and you'll uncover hats hidden in all kinds of places.
:D
 
@Robusto well that was their eightth level, no?
At any rate, for most of the cues presented in this particular video I feel I'm at that level anyway, without even playing any of the pieces even just once, but simply from having listened to them a million times before. You just know how it's supposed to sound.
Additionally, I would like to submit that any number higher than 3, there's never a point in counting in the first place, no matter your level. Especially if your level is anywhere below "knowing the part cold including all the cues, so that you just feel it".
If you have to count to like 17, or even just 9, you will miscount even if you know the part by heart. Actually probably only more so if you do. It's like going for a walk and suddenly starting to think which foot to put forth next. You'll immediately forget how walking works, and stumble and fall.
 
 
1 hour later…
2:14 PM
@RegDwigнt Looks nice. It really is quite amazing how much good interface design just boils down to common sense.
Lots of designers just look at a bunch of features and think they're doing their job by finding bins to put them in.
A good designer starts from the standpoint of How do I need to work?
The analogy I used to give my clients for an effective interface is that used in an automobile. The biggest thing at hand is the steering wheel, because it gets used most. Without moving, your hands can reach the next most important things: turn signals, wipers, etc. Your right foot is either on the gas or the brake. Your left foot is idle, except in a manual transmission car. And so on.
There is what I call a hierarchy of utility. Stuff you rarely use may not even be on the dash.
 
2:30 PM
TIL if you right-click on the back arrow button, you get your recent pages visited history
in the upper left hand corner of the browser
 
3:05 PM
@skullpatrol Also left-click and hold brings it up. It's been there for years, btw. You need to get out more. ^_^
 
4:05 PM
Hi
hope all of you are doing well
 
 
2 hours later…
6:07 PM
If my company name is Sourcewing, then is it correct to write "Merry Christmas from Sourcewing" on company's social media post?
 
6:20 PM
@Vikas Yes, that sounds fine.
 
6:40 PM
@Cerberus thanks
 
7:14 PM
@Robusto yeah. The thing about MuseScore (the software) is that it really isn't half bad. It's quite good, actually.
Tantacrul said as much in his review. You've seen how it compared to his review of Sibelius.
Half of the Sibelius review, he spent bleeding right out of his very eyes. Half of the MuseScore review, he spent on saying that one tiny thing about their logo could be better.
And that's really quite emblematic right there. They got the logo 98% right, but it's the last 2% that make all the difference between acceptable and polished.
Same with the software.
To stay with your analogy, it's like you have a car where everything is just fine, all the gauges and the pedals and the levers. But the glove compartment is above your head. Like WTF.
And it's not like it's unusable there, or that it gets in the way of using other things. It's sorta fine really. It's just that WTF. Who puts a glove compartment there. Have they seen a car before.
With Sibelius, it's like the glove compartment is built into the steering wheel, the pedals are in reverse order, and the rear-view mirror is inside the trunk.
So yeah. I can see why he took up on their offer to get involved. It's not a lot of work, and it's all just common sense.
Sibelius is basically unsalvageable at this point. MuseScore doesn't even need to be salvaged, merely polished.
 
7:40 PM
How do scarves work?
Like, not how do they keep you warm, but how do you put them around your neck?
Do you have the two ends hang around the back of your neck and drop down in front? It keeps the back of your neck warm but tends to leave your throat exposed.
Do you circle you neck with it? Solves the cold-throat problem but then I feel like you're in danger of strangulation if it somehow gets snagged like on a closing door.
Do you fold it in half and pull the ends through the loop so it keeps your neck and throat warm, adds some to your front, and is somewhat compact, like a poor man's ascot? We're getting there but it seems weird to do all that and it make the scarf all wrinkled and smushed.
I grew up in a non-scarf culture. Sure it snowed maybe once a year (and melted the next day) but scarves were things in picture books along with horse-drawn sleds and ice-skating on frozen ponds.
 
7:57 PM
How odd.
I will normally bring a scarf when the temperature is expected to drop below, say, 10 degrees.
 
@Mitch Google Nolan
Wait, they took off that scarf image
 
@Cerberus The causes of my youth's scarf-impoverished culture is interesting yet another story altogether. What's important is the operation of these cloth based mechanisms.
 
I see.
I just circle it around my neck, once or twice depending on the temperature.
 
Is it like a toga for the neck? A sari? Curtains? In the evolution of fashion, I'm sure an ascot and men's tie are related but morphologically a scarf and a tie are distinct.
@Cerberus But... but...
 
I'd actually prefer it if we could have a piece of cloth that attached itself to the front of one's neck.
 
8:13 PM
What if you, or worse some nefarious by-stander, are slamming a door? Aren't you concerned about being choked to death?
 
So far, no.
 
@Cerberus Right. One's coat is designed to take care of the back part already.
 
I'd still have two necks left.
@Mitch That, and it is the front that catches the wind, especially while cycling.
While the rest of the body may be too warm.
 
@Cerberus You should consider it. It's not an everyday occurrence but watch out for automatic grocery store doors.
Peple rarely get into car wrecks, but there exist seat belt laws.
It's a perfect analogy.
@Cerberus We aren't all so conveniently endowed.
@Cerberus Which brings up the problem of the scarf wrapping method which leaves one end free to whip around in the wind and interrupt your vision, just as you're going through the intersection with the live-chicken truck and the oil truck.
Holy crap, there's too much to read.
You read one thing, and boom, there's already another thing waiting for you.
 
@Mitch Automatic grocery store doors: what kind of doors did you have in mind?
@Mitch I'm so sorry.
@Mitch Or, worse, when you're bending over to empty your postbox, the loose end always obscures 100% of your vision, on purpose.
 
8:31 PM
@Cerberus Either the sliding kind or the swinging kind. Both are gateways to nightmares.
Also to grocery stores.
That's hard to reconcile.
@Cerberus Thank you for recognizing others' limitations.
 
@Mitch Automatic doors that swing?
I don't think we have those.
@Mitch Oh, I have no problem whatsoever in recognising others' limitations.
Nor in pointing them out.
 
@Cerberus Your loss.
Or maybe... good for you for dodging that bullet what with all your scarves and stuff.
@Cerberus That didn't go in a direction I was expecting.
@Cerberus Yes, exactly, if in the hypothetical but totally unexpected and bizarre situation where you have to lean over to open a postbox.
How tall are you?
OMG... you're Dutch, aren't you?
And worse... representatively Dutch.
 
@Mitch Always expect the unexpected in this room.
 
I was going to say something but thought better of it.
Or rather, I forgot.
 
@Mitch Mine is actually very low and inconvenient.
 
8:39 PM
@Cerberus Questionable engineering. Like the scarf.
 
It's built into the wall of the next house, quite a bit below its window sill.
 
In the case of the scarf, I'd say hardly any engineering at all.
 
How daring of you.
 
@Cerberus It is what it is. You do with what you got.
But again that brings us back to the scarf.
What do you do with what you've got, which is remarkably little.
 
Did I mention that the opening is smaller than the box, so that it is quite difficult to get the papers out?
 
8:41 PM
@Cerberus You did not mention that. That description seems paradoxical. Like you're saying the outside is smaller than the inside.
 
And that it has razor-sharp edges that cut and scrape your skin?
 
Oh.
That's not uncommon for mail boxes.
Frankly it's not by design, but is an unintended long term consequence.
 
Imagine a box with a hinge at the top.
 
A high what at the top?
haha did you just get me to say profanity?
 
The box is mounted in a rectangular slot in the wall.
 
8:43 PM
Yeah, I get that.
 
*hinge
The lid hangs down from the hinge.
 
and the little door that you open with barely a key is hardly big enough to get out whatever junk mail there is that you will then immediately throw out.
@Cerberus I liked it better when it said 'high'.
@Cerberus Oh OK I know those kinds of mailboxes.
 
I'm sure that's highly perverted.
 
the mailperson opens the whole row at once, from a hinge at the bottom and slips all the different owners mail really quickly. But then only each person can open their own mailbox.
 
But, when you lift the door, it's not just an open box you look into, but the opening has edges or a rim(?) around the opening.
 
8:46 PM
@Cerberus That reminds me of the song 'You oughtta know'
@Cerberus yeah
 
@Mitch No, if only we had that!
 
This is important work we're doing. Describing mailbox tech.
@Cerberus Oh. My imagination ran ahead of me.
and then tripped in the ice and slid down the stairs.
My imagination is really going to have a sore ass tomorrow.
 
The hinge is at the top, which means you need to keep it open using one hand, while you're bending over trying to get the papers out using your other hand.
 
Which reminds me of a proverb.
There's no home like your own home.
Which in Irish is punnable to...
There's no sore ass like your own sore ass.
 
@Mitch Highly imaginative, yes.
 
8:48 PM
The Irish are crazy
 
How lovely.
 
which is another pun but this time in German
 
I'm on my mobile.
 
@Cerberus That explains a lot.
Quite a lot.
That was the British 'quite', not the American 'quite'.
 
How very different.
 
8:52 PM
Nil aon tinteán mar do thinteán fein
Níl aon tóin tinn mar do thóin tinn féin.
Is anyone else cold or is it just me?
 
9:41 PM
@Cerberus Oh man. Trying to tie your shoes with the loose end of a scarf in the way.
 
@Mitch Exactly!
 
Either the scarf situation needs fixing or the shoelaces.
 
10:03 PM
Just to head off any problems, velcro just makes it all worse.
 

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