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6:29 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Bad keyword in answer, blacklisted website in answer, pattern-matching website in answer, potentially bad keyword in answer, shortened url in answer (314): "Super-duper ultra mega" by xohivera on english.SE
 
 
3 hours later…
9:55 AM
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Pattern-matching website in answer, potentially bad ns for domain in answer (80): In the homework or on the homework by Jamcy Orders on english.SE
[ SmokeDetector | MS ] Pattern-matching website in answer, potentially bad ns for domain in answer (80): English translation for the different parts of a course as found in French schools/universities by Jamcy Orders on english.SE
 
 
5 hours later…
3:26 PM
@RegDwigнt: This is kind of interesting:
You can ignore the ad in the middle, but he does make an interesting point.
I always thought the Romantic Era turned on this single opera, but never analyzed why.
In any case, a worthy coda to our discussion about not leaping to resolve dissonances. Just let 'em dangle!
BTW, his "studio" makes me nostalgic for the conservatory. Never thought I'd be nostalgic for a practice room ... but that's where I met and played with so many good musicians, shared ideas, joked around, sight-read through tons of the literature ...
True story: I was playing trios (flute, cello, piano) in a practice room one day when some crusading Jesus freak (not a student there) invited himself in. He waited until we took note of him. "My, you play so beautifully," he said. "You surely must know the love of Jesus Christ in your hearts." Without missing a beat (or turning around) the pianist replied, "No, but if you hum a few bars we can fake it."
3
 
 
3 hours later…
6:25 PM
The more I think about this, the more I think the parse might be: I saw lem, where the th is replaced by the l sound and that the l is not added to the saw. The /l/ is substituted for the /ð/ . The place of articulation of /l/ is alveolar and /ð/ is dental. The places of articulation are contiguous. That makes much more sense to me, whereas your saw[l] 'em does not. — Lambie 25 mins ago
Why is this person trying to convince me I either did not hear what I heard or am not competent to relate it to EL&U? Can some helpful mod please convert that whole thread to a chat, please, so I can get on with my life?
 
 
2 hours later…
8:10 PM
I don't know, it could all be a lot worse.
 
 
2 hours later…
10:08 PM
@Robusto oh yeah it is. I watched it the other day actually. Really illuminating. Because I remember how back in high school a big deal was made of that chord, but I never understood why. But then a mere 20+ years later I watched this video and I understood why.
Funny.
@Robusto and also, his practice room made me nostalgic for being in a practice room, and I've never even been in a practice room before.
I'm not sure why. It just has that certain something to it.
How midway through someone else started practicing violin in the room nearby.
It just has that certain feel that school always had.
Speaking of violins, as expected my teacher said I needed no further markings for the Mandelstam.
It was quite funny how she put it, too. She said something like, yeah that's a Russian romance alright. So you can tie it any way you please. And it'll all sound fine. Or you can just do the usual boilerplate pattern that suggests itself just from looking at the notes. And that will also work fine.
So we just quickly bowed whatever a couple times, and it sounded fine, and thus warmed up we moved on to Bach.
So with that in mind, I'm ready to let this one go for the time being and move on to the next thing. Last night I made the changes you proposed, and came up with one or two of my own.
So the current state of the draft is as follows:
> Don't ever tell anyone,
forget everything that has been:
the heron, the prison, the nun,
or really whatever you've seen...

Maybe at dawn, when by chance
you'll give voice to only one thing,
then you'll be struck all at once
by a familiar sting.

You'll remember the wasp in the park,
the pen case you had as a kid,
the poppies you always picked up,
the blueberries you never did.
Score's updated and the link is still musescore.com/user/27897310/scores/5853817/s/e34t7P
Still set to private as of now, but as you said, getting it perfectly right will take twenty years anyway, or maybe forever. So I'll probably schedule it for publication in the nearest future, and then just keep revisiting it every year or so. As I always do with all my stuff anyway.
Oh, and re: violin MIDI, I just always give the voice line to some instrument of my choosing because the sound font for the human voice is only even worse. Anything but human.
Typically I'd pick the clarinet. It mimicks the human voice so well, even the most shittiest soundfont incarnation of it that you can find, it still sounds kinda sorta acceptable somehow.
But this melody here, if I gave that to the clarinet, it'd be the worst clarinet piece yet created.
The fingering is all over the place, and the sound is constantly switching between three registers. And the whole entire climax pretty much sits straight in the throat register. Ugh.
But for the violin, the ambitus couldn't be more perfect if I tried.
And also Jesus Christ does it sound gorgeous on an actual violin.
Plays really well, too. Such a joy to play.
But yeah. Ultimately it's a voice line and everything else is just me faffing about.
And it was only ever written at the piano anyway.
 
10:36 PM
BEHOLD
...
THE WALL
...
OF TEXT
...
THAT TAKETH
...
THAT TAKETH AWAYAY
...
THE LIFE
...
OF
...
THE ROOM!
Set Largo, in Gm.
 
I would have written a longer wall but I had too much time.
@tchrist that's like straight out of the Messiah. All those trills on every other note. What was it, number 18 or something.
 
@RegDwigнt Four and twenty.
 
I'm actually checking.
 
Hah, it's the 19. Or 20 by our count.
Good guess even if I say so myself.
 
10:43 PM
Wait, how can we count differently?
Oh.
You're in duodecimal.
Got it.
Don't make me go get my score.
Gardiner does take it at a bit of a clip.
 
The opening Grave (Sinfonia) is counted as 0.
So you should think that'd get you 18.
But then the 13 and the 14 are counted as 14, and the 17 is 18a and something else is also likewise other things.
It doesn't need to make sense.
 
Messiah (HWV 56), the English-language oratorio composed by George Frideric Handel in 1741, is structured in three parts. This listing covers Part II in a table and comments on individual movements, reflecting the relation of the musical setting to the text. Part I begins with the prophecy of the Messiah and his birth, shows the annunciation to the shepherds and reflects the Messiah's deeds on earth. Part II covers the Passion in nine movements including the oratorio's longest movement, an air for alto He was despised, then mentions death, resurrection, ascension, and reflects the spreading of...
 
As long as we're all on the same page.
Quite literally.
 
Boy am I confused!
fetches his score
 
Here, lemme show you.
As us pro gamers like to say, "It's as easy as that. You just do them one of these."
 
10:53 PM
22 for me
 
Good for you. Apparently it being a hundred pieces already is not quite too much enough for you, so you've just added a couple of your own.
On that note, likewise with those trills.
What happened to the yo dawg meme anyway?
 
The opening grave overture is numbered 1 here.
But that still seems curious.
 
Yo dawg, I herd u liek trills, so we put trills on your trills so you can trill while you trill.
Reminds me of how my father explained Dostoyevsky to me.
 
When you have so much grave and largo, you have plenty of time to decorate with beautifications.
En-bello-izing it.
With grave, you can put trills on the trills even.
 
11:12 PM
Hm. Can't even find my Dostoyevski story. Have I not told it before? I was sure I had.
So I was like twelve and I made the mistake of reading Dostoyevski. Way too early. Too young. And that spoiled Dostoyevski for me, and I've never read anything of his ever again.
And my dad had been warning me. He warned me alright.
Look, he said. He took a piece of paper and a pencil and drew a straight line. Look. This is how Pushkin writes.
Eugene Onegin, Dame Pique, the Bronze Horseman. Look. This is how he writes. A straight line.
And I looked, and I nodded, and I knew. I knew all the titles. I had read all the books. A straight line.
He drew a squiggly line atop the straight line. Crossing it back and forth. A sinus wave. This is Tolstoy, he said. This is Tolstoy's writing.
And I nodded and I knew.
And then he took the pencil once again and carefully, slowly, painstakingly drew a sinus wave along the sinus wave. A squiggly line hugging the squiggly line. A line going back and forth across the line going back and forth across the straight line.
This, he said, this here is Dostoyevski. This is what Dostoyevski does.
He writes round and about and about and around. All around the around. Branches off the branches, dances around the dance, beats around the beating of the bush. Or whatever similes you prefer.
This is Dostoyevski, my father said. When you grow up, you'll understand. When you grow up, you'll be ready. You're not ready yet.
My father was right.
So basically I'm still waiting to grow up.
And now I must be off to play Fallout Shelter on my Switch.
Nighty-night, everyone.
 
11:41 PM
@RegDwigнt So like the sinusoidal orbital resonances of Naiad and Thalassa.
 

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