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12:18 AM
@Rob Stylii.
:P
 
@cornbreadninja麵包忍者 So you say. I agonized over that, realizing that SOMEONE was going to correct me. Only I thought it would be @Cerberus.
How was the dinner?
 
@Robusto I have this Crosley I got a few months ago because hey, it's better than the 50s Magnavox suitcase player I had. This Crosley has an Audio Technica cartridge and adjustable tracking.
@Robusto My chicken breast was rather flattish. An A-cup at best.
 
Ah, I remember Audio Technica
@cornbreadninja麵包忍者 You got robbed.
 
There's just a big slug of metal at the back of the tone arm that you can turn.
@Rob Are you getting doubly pung?
@Robusto I'll say. The drink wasn't very strong, neither.
It might be styluses.
 
At least no dishes to wash.
 
12:22 AM
>View full results for 'stylus'
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stylus, n.
View as: Outline |Full entryKeywords: On |OffQuotations: Show all |Hide all
Pronunciation: /ˈstaɪləs/
**Forms: Also stilus. Pl. styluses, styli.**
Etymology: < Latin stylus, incorrect form of stilus : see style n.
WTF, bold.
Isn't that how we bold?
Yeah.
@Robusto Truth. And mother paid.
 
12:38 AM
We bold.
 
@Robusto Stop it!!
commits seppuku
 
mit Genitiv?
Messy murder, that.
 
Mit Lateinisch.
 
Whatever you do in the pervacy of your own offal is your own business.
 
1:07 AM
[ SmokeDetector ] Manually reported answer: Is there a word to describe the organisation of cells? by yosa on english.stackexchange.com
[ SmokeDetector ] Manually reported answer: Is there a word to describe the organisation of cells? by yosa on english.stackexchange.com
 
 
5 hours later…
crl
6:53 AM
Quentin Tarantina Turner and Bruce Lee-T are my favorite
+ Cher Guevarra
Mad Maxl Rose? Who is Rose?
 
the singer in guns n roses
 
crl
Ah thanks
 
 
5 hours later…
crl
12:21 PM
♟♟♟♟♟♟♟♟
♜♞♝♛♚♝♞♜
2
 
12:46 PM
♜♞♝♛♚♝♞♜
♟♟♟♟♟♟♟♟
____________
____________
♟♟♟♟♟♟♟♟
♜♞♝♛♚♝♞♜
 
@skillpatrol Black on black action?
 
12:58 PM
@Cerberus the outcome I had been hoping for; you're too easy
 
That's a terrible thing to hope for.
 
@skillpatrol I'm joking with him, in case you couldn't tell. Just as he was joking with me. Do you really think he cut his belly open? Really?
 
They say it is an honourable death.
 
I would not care to find out one way or the other.
 
Do you @crl have any white pieces?
Btw, what does "crl" stand for? @crl
 
crl
1:14 PM
@skillpatrol just "cyril" without vowels
@skillpatrol not directly, but I'll ask in HTML room if there's a css trick for inverting there color colour (since you're brit :))
 
@crl You'd still have to deal with backgrounds. Don't forget there are white squares and black squares.
You can't just have a black piece on a black square or a white piece on a white one. They'd just disappear.
See the box with diagonal lines at the bottom?
That's how they indicate a dark square.
And your white pieces still have black outlines. They're not all white.
Now, since you don't want transparency inside the white pieces (they have to look white even on dark backgrounds), and since font characters can't be two colors, it's better to use images instead of fonts for chess.
 
The Unicode chess figures are there for inline text, not for creating graphical displays.
 
You mean for annotations like 2.♝xe3?
 
crl
yes it's hard, it's not really 'inverting' colors, but maybe there's something possible with css... Well yes you're both right, we should rather use images for that
 
@crl The problem is, just making the font color:white would still cause it to disappear on white backgrounds.
 
crl
1:29 PM
even with a border?
 
A border on the font?
 
crl
hehe I suck in CSS, sorry
 
@Robusto Yes.
 
@crl You could do it with text-shadow but it would be ugly.
@tchrist Usually alphabet characters are a quicker read even there: 2.Bxe3 R(e1)xe3, etc.
Don't get me wrong, I'm all for having chess pieces as available characters in a font. I just don't see much use for them. Still, I'm sure there must be some.
 
Anybody know what a "locum editor" is?
 
1:43 PM
Something to improve sperm count?
 
crl
A locum is a person who temporarily fulfills the duties of another. For example, a locum physician is a physician who works in the place of the regular physician when that physician is absent, or when a hospital/practice is short-staffed. These professionals are still governed by their respective regulatory bodies, despite the transient nature of their positions. The word locum is short for the Latin phrase locum tenens (lit. "place holder", akin to the French lieutenant). The abbreviated form "locum" is common in Australia, Canada, Ireland, Malaysia, Singapore, New Zealand, South Africa and the...
 
@crl Ah, thanks.
 
crl
I don't really know what it means, it's a technical term employed in editorial boards, like those persons (in their cv linkedin.com/title/locum-editor)
 
2:01 PM
@terdon I suspect it's used as a more inflated way of expressing a temp (temporary) position.
The word "temp" usually describes a low-skill job, probably not suitable for positions that require a great deal of education.
 
It sounds like a way to get your foot in the door :-)
 
 
1 hour later…
3:04 PM
To really sound spiff, a chamber might have a president pro tempore presiding over it.
Still just a temp guy. :)
 
Or a table.
Or a commission.
 
A commission, sure, but a table?
> Hocus pocus, locus focus:
Can you tell me what the joke is?
 
@tchrist Yes, absolutely. Or a meeting.
Anything presidable.
 
One presides over a table?
 
Yes, on formal occasions.
 
3:08 PM
Like King Arthur
 
It may mean that you make the first speech, that you arrange the order of speakers, or whatever.
Yes, or that.
 
For formal occasions, the maître d'hôtel will preside over the dinner table. :)
 
Nonsense!
 
@Cerberus Hey! I thought you committed seppuku! Yet here you are.
 
Seppuku works in a slightly different way down here.
In short: you're still in the underworld.
 
3:09 PM
Someone needs to set the courses in order and decide when to introduce the appropriate amuse-bouche and piquant bon-mot. :)
 
That is for the staff, as you say—not for the company to arrange.
 
@Cerberus Pretty lofty description for a Nederlander.
 
The opposite of lofty, I should think.
 
@Cerberus Thank you for getting my joke.
 
3:11 PM
Someone has been attending his catachresm classes.
 
Sarcasm at its finest
 
3:24 PM
@Robusto Sounds reasonable.
 
3:43 PM
Life is hard in Mexico. And apt to get harder.
 
Dura y curta es la vida; luego te mueres.
 
crl
@Robusto How would you call the 'efficiency' of your bike or a road (friction, aerodynamics for the bike, ...)? in French we would say "la route a un bon rendement"
 
It's an easy ride?
 
crl
'easy' would mean low slope or something, not really the efficiency of the road's cover
 
hm hm hm
A smooth road versus a rough road?
 
crl
3:54 PM
hmm not yet.. performance could fit better maybe linguee.fr/francais-anglais/… more looking for a 'metric' that qualifies the road
 
4:07 PM
@Robusto That was my hasty attempt at showing that I got it.
@tchrist By the way, it is true that italics rather than quotation marks are preferred to show that you're repeating someone else's words on ELU, isn't it?
 
@Cerberus That is my feeling.
When you have an entire sentence, though, I often use "> " formatting.
It stands out better that way.
 
Right.
I vacillate.
 
@crl not sure what you're looking for.
Aerodynamics?
Profile?
We may not have an equivalent term.
 
4:33 PM
I think efficiency is correct
verkningsgrad
 
@Robusto It got better
What is a cheese sandwich with ham or salami called in English? (if at all)
Other than 'excellent'.
 
A Monte Cristo?
A Monte Cristo is a fried ham and cheese sandwich, a variation of the French croque-monsieur. In the 1930s–1960s, American cookbooks had recipes for this sandwich, under such names as French Sandwich, Toasted Ham Sandwich, and French Toasted Cheese Sandwich. Emmental or Gruyère cheese is typically used. == DescriptionEdit == In most regions, the sandwich is savory rather than sweet. Traditionally, it is dipped in its entirety in egg batter and pan fried, though it may also be deep fried. Regional variations may include sliced turkey. In some areas of the US it is served grilled, in others as an...
 
Hm... yes, that sounds slightly familiar but would sound funny. I don't think I'd be comfortable ever saying that
 
Well then go live among the heathens. I will continue calling it a Monte Cristo.
 
croque-monsieur is what I'm used to hearing in the context of the sandwich but not in the US. It is very foreign sounding.
I think Monte Cristo is what other Americans would recognize I suppose
what about UK?
 
4:40 PM
@Robusto Two, please.
 
Speaking of seppuku, it's interesting to note that it has the same meaning as hara kiri, and the kanji are switched to spell each: 腹切 is hara kiri (belly cut) and seppuku (cut belly) is 切腹.
 
@Mitch Same here: we call it a tosti (from toasted, or something), but the difference is that we don't put any cheese on top.
 
@Cerberus How can you not put cheese on top? You're in fucking Holland, ferchrissakes.
 
@Robusto Really? I thought the technique was slightly different...
 
Wait... a Monte Cristo is dipped in batter? That sounds great but too much work. What if it's not dipped in batter?
 
4:41 PM
@Robusto We are also niggardly Calvinists, you fool.
 
@Cerberus did that pic make you wanting to eat it?
 
@JohanLarsson Certainly!
 
I thought hara kiri was stabbing in the heart
 
Besides, I'll eat anything.
 
@Cerberus I'm not versed in the fine points of self slaughter, of course, but both involve belly cutting. How much more do you need to go into it? Dictionary lists "ritual suicide, ritual disembowelment" for both.
 
4:42 PM
Whoa. No standards?
@Robusto Well, you have to go far enough in to make the goop come out.
 
@Robusto Well, there is the technique where you make a belly cut, tie it up with bandages, present yourself to your lord, then remove the bandages and bleed to death before his eyes, as an act of protest. I forgot the name.
 
@Cerberus Like I said, I'm not up on the fine points.
 
Nor I.
 
@Cerberus ooh that's tough.
 
Very Asian.
 
4:44 PM
I understood that to do it right you have to cut across then make a second cut upward to the breastbone.
Only the hardiest individuals would be able to complete that.
 
I think the best course of action for the lord is to walk away. Say something like "Pardon me, I have to go clip my nails"
 
The "normal" practice was to have a friend behead you just as the incision for the first cut was entered.
 
"and oh you should clean that up. the stains wil be hard to get out"
@Robusto "Thanks, pal"
 
@Mitch Or, "Hey, I forgive you."
 
Lovely.
 
4:45 PM
"Drinks later?"
 
Seppuku (切腹 or せっぷく), "stomach- or abdomen-cutting," is a form of Japanese ritual suicide by disembowelment. Seppuku was originally reserved for samurai. Part of the samurai bushido honor code, seppuku was used either voluntarily by samurai to die with honor rather than fall into the hands of their enemies (and likely suffer torture) or as a form of capital punishment for samurai who had committed serious offenses, or performed because they had brought shame to themselves. The ceremonial disembowelment, which is usually part of a more elaborate ritual and performed in front of spectators, consists...
 
@Robusto or "This is all fine and good, but you know, I realize now your wife is sort of free now, do you mind if..."
 
So seppuku was reserved for samurai.
Perhaps hara kiri was the more general term.
 
"Hey hey hey> Stop that! You're no samurai! no Seppuku for you!" "Aww man I was so looking forward to it"
 
I only say that because I doubt @Cerberus qualifies as a samurai.
jinxish
 
4:48 PM
@Robusto We only know what little he says here. He may very well be one. Unexpected, but not impossible.
 
Highly unlikely. They only take legit Japanese. In truth, Tom Cruise would never make it. Nor would Keanu Reeves.
 
I mean are al the samurai sitting around at the bar saying "Dude, I am totally going to shame my boss by spilling my guts over his living room carpet. That'll show him!"
 
And, of course, the samurai were disbanded during Meiji.
 
@Robusto You need some white guy to do it right. What do the locals really know about how to do it.
@Robusto Good thing too. twist ties are easier to use.
 
Interestingly, my wife's parents come from two of the biggest samurai clans in Japan.
We've even seen their kimono patterns on exhibit in art museums.
Not why I married her, though.
 
4:51 PM
My grt/grt/grt/grt paternal grandfather had a tartan that was made up just like everyone else's.
@Robusto The family fortune. THat's the real draw
 
Sshhh.
 
It's a really horrible realization when you count up all your rich uncles and there are zero.
 
@Robusto That's really cool.
 
She sucks at kendo, however. Even I could beat her.
 
When I searched for hara kiri, Wikipaedia redirected me immediately to seppuku.
And there is no mention of any difference in the article, is there?
 
I do understand your nipophilia now.
Must leave now, bye!
 
Nipple feel ya?
 
@Rob did you ever listen to Ghost Dog Soundtrack? Great album imo.
 
How do they manage to keep it piping hot after all those decades?
 
chafing dishes
 
6:14 PM
@tchrist Since it's IEEE one would suppose they have electronic warmers of some kind.
@JohanLarsson I'll give it a listen.
 
6:31 PM
Well I'm all for open access for myself, but for the publishers the money has to come from somewhere.
I take that back.. Publishing in line should be minimal. And 'peer review' is free (or already a part of academia business)
 
@Mitch Bull. The authors pay to be published, the articles are edited for free and the readers pay to read. That's just ridiculous. If you're asking for ~3000$ per article (and that is a relatively cheap price), at the very least you can provide access for free.
Expecting people to pay on both ends is absurd.
 
Authors don't pay. Not in the sciences at least
 
@Mitch The hell they don't!
 
@Mitch I just like zero indexing better.
 
@Mitch I've never seen a journal that will publish for free. The big boys most certainly won't.
Not in biology or any other science I know. Perhaps your field is different.
 
6:42 PM
$3000 per articles? For one person to read? I don't get it.
 
@terdon mutters Elsevier while twisting in his nightmares
 
@Mitch Nobody does but hey, that's the way it's done.
 
Math cs
 
> A paper that costs US$5,000 for an author to publish in Cell Reports, for example, might cost just $1,350 to publish in PLoS ONE
@Mitch I've (well, the funding body in question) been charged about 3000$ per page for color.
@Mitch Yeah, you guys seem to have a far healthier system.
 
We don't use color
 
6:51 PM
Actually, I may have to eat my words here. I'm not sure that you pay if you don't want to make the article open access. I was pretty sure you did but I can't find the prices mentioned anywhere in which case my ire was misplaced.
Righteous, but misplaced.
 
But the cost of writing is somewhat hidden behind a grant and stipends and the university costs
Yeah! Down with the Man!
Like communism, something has to be paid somewhere
 
OK, most of the big guys don't actually charge for non-open access articles:
22
Q: Do Springer, IEEE, Elsevier charge a fee for non-open-access journals?

facuqMy PhD advisor and lab colleagues think that Springer, IEEE and Elsevier journals non-open-access charge authors for submitting a paper. (They usually only publish in local journals.) All the info I've found points to the contrary (except for "gold" open access journals, which do charge authors),...

 
@Mitch A guy I went to high school with spent his career working for IEEE.
 
I've always made mine open access though, so I do pay. Muchly.
 
@terdon I think this is unclear.
We had big issues with Springer and Elsevier at my bio-NLP job at the university.
We had access but we had to be careful about mass-downloads.
 
6:56 PM
Ah, hidden fees, huh?
OK, but I was thinking of outright x $ per page
 
Even though we got Elsevier dumps of most journals, which were really so much better because they were in XML.
I know that I cannot get at a hell of a lot of non-PMCOA articles from non-university accounts.
They usually get stuck at Springer.
For the company, read Elsevier.
@terdon Ok, that's for publishing something in an Elsevier or Springer etc journal, not for access to read it.
 
Yes, publishing fees.
 
University libraries pay out the urethra for journal access.
 
7:25 PM
.
 
7:53 PM
@tchrist yes, gouging the universities is what the academic publishers are well known for. that also falls over to the pricing to non-academics, what makes it $30 an article.
In the olden days (80's and before?) you could just right a letter to an author and they'd send you one of their copies (that they paid for from the publisher as part of the publishing price to the author). So yes, it used to be that the author paid, but that hasn't been the case for a while i think.
 
@Mitch YUSAY THE?
 
What does the "(All)" mean?
All sources?
 
@Rob maybe you find this interesting
I have not finished it yet.
 
8:09 PM
@skillpatrol case insensitivly
 
@tchrist I see, thanks.
 
 
2 hours later…
10:04 PM
wasn't that good
 

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