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11:15 AM
Which one should be chosen as the duplicate target? (I am a bit hesitant to go with the oldest one - by today's standard it would be closed as PSQ. Of course, at the time the standards of the site were less strict.)
Does some of the have very nice answers - so that they would deserve to be merged into the one that remains open?
Of course, I definitely do not claim that I found all occurrences of the question.
 
11:36 AM
BTW one of those question just got the Popular question badge.
 
 
1 hour later…
1:04 PM
@MartinSleziak I like this one as the target.
For the most part, the answers are all more-or-less the same.
However, this answer uses techniques which I don't see elsewhere.
Of course, I'm a sucker for difference equations and a citation!
 
So you suggest to go the oldest one, even though the question does not provide context.
That was the main reason why I asked. (But several people has suggested that we should be less strict about context in the question which have been posted long time ago.)
Well if that question becomes the duplicate target, it will be less likely to get deleted. (IIRC, a question which is a duplicate target cannot be deleted - at least until all other questions closed as duplicates of this one are deleted, too.)
Regardless of whether or not this post is chosen as the duplicate target, it definitely deserves a more descriptive title. (The title should include the recurrence, not just say "a recurrence with a summation function inside".)
 
@MartinSleziak Yes, I do.
None of the questions is really that context-heavy.
 
I'll wait a bit to see whether somebody else has some feedback on this. But if nobody has some other suggestion, I'll go with the duplicate target that you proposed.
 
thumbs up emoji
 
It's true that none of the questions is excellent "context-wise", but some of them at least mention where the recurrence comes from.
BTW who is CRLS? ("The recurrence above can be obtained in CLRS's Introduction to Algorithms, $3$rd edition, page $364,$ where the authors discuss rod-cutting problem using Recursive top-down implementation.")
I see: Introduction to Algorithms is a book on computer programming by Thomas H. Cormen, Charles E. Leiserson, Ronald L. Rivest, and Clifford Stein.
 
1:18 PM
@MartinSleziak That is likely the source.
 

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