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3:53 PM
-4
Q: Why are questions closed?

AmoebaProteusI would like to know why questions can be closed in general; it just occurred to me that even if the question does not make sense to you, there is no reason to close it and prevent it from ever being answered by someone else. What is the point of closing questions?

I see that you have mentioned in a comment my edit to your question. I will point out that the only thing I did there was adding the (infinite-product) tag. @GerryMyerson I cannot be sure, but it's possible that it is about this question - it was already discussed on meta a bit. — Martin Sleziak 9 hours ago
@MartinSleziak someone edited it a lot more than that; I thought it was you. — AmoebaProteus 9 mins ago
Don't you remember changing the writing style somewhat and (not intentionally) the meaning as well? — AmoebaProteus 5 mins ago
I think that the revision history shows all edits pretty clearly.
Here is revision 2 - before any edits of mine.
The only changes to revision 4 were adding a tag, fixing some spaces, missing dollar.
Here is revision 5 after an edit by Chill2Macht.
And then revision 6 after one more additional edit by the OP.
@AmoebaProteus You can simply have a look at the revision history (which is why I included link to it). In any case, if we have to discuss who edited what, we can continue in chat - so that we do not make this comment thread unnecessarily long. — Martin Sleziak 9 secs ago
To include the context, here are the comments under Greg Martin's answer:
0
A: Is the following infinite product of fractions of linear factors equal to an exponential function or not?

Greg MartinThis infinite product definitely doesn't converge for any $x$. A necessary condition for an infinite product over $a,b$ to converge is that the individual factors tend to $1$ as $|a|,|b|\to\infty$, but that's not the case here (since $|a|$ and $|b|$ can tend to $\infty$ together in lots of differ...

"A necessary condition for an infinite product over a,b to converge is that the individual factors tend to 1 as |a|,|b|→∞, but that's not the case here " Yes I know this, that is why I wrote : 'Is there a way to transform the infinite product so that it becomes an exponential function, e.g. by modifying each term individually?' I was asking if each factor or maybe the whole series can be divided by a constant factor each time the truncation is lengthened so that it doesn't diverge. — AmoebaProteus 2 days ago
You might northave got this impression because Martin Sleziak edited it... — AmoebaProteus 2 days ago
Can you at least explain why the question was closed? — AmoebaProteus 2 days ago
 

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