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2:13 AM
@FireQuacker No man! I forgot again! It could have saved me so much time!
problem is that almost all my ISP's users are not techie guys. At all. They believe that if they upgrade their 100MB connection to 200MB connection, Netflix will be better. But nobody have 5 8k TVs on Netflix all the time.
So when anyone have an issue, tech support think they shutdown the router, or put a metal crate around it, or something like that. When I say that the latency is terrible and the connection is unreliable, they imagine a Windows XP with IE and endless toolbars... And when I ask about traffic shaping and QoS, they panic because they don't know what I am talking about...
so they follow the script, and the script ends when I show an ICMP Network Unreachable followed by 12 seconds of silence and a ping response... And they try all the things they usually do, until they get to the end of the script and it says "replace hardware"...
I used to say "I am a network engineer, and my connection is down" so they would stop asking stupid questions (like telling me that if I cannot access Google, I could try something else... If I cannot access Google, I would put my money on the ISP being the culprit, not that Google is somehow offline)... but to me that sounds patronizing, so I stopped...
and I let them run their scripts...
 
 
10 hours later…
12:30 PM
With ECDSA keys, is a key tied to a particular curve?
 
 
1 hour later…
1:43 PM
@paj28 Yes. Unless there's a bijection between the curves, like between ed25519 and x25519: libsodium.gitbook.io/doc/advanced/ed25519-curve25519.
 
2:33 PM
@A.Hersean - Thanks for that. If you have an OpenSSH ssh_host_ecdsa_key do you know how you can tell which curve(s) it can be used for?
 
2:52 PM
@paj28 You might have a byte coding the curve, you'll have to look into the file format. If you only have the key without metadata, you can first look at it's size to reduce the number of potential curves, then for each remaining curve, check if the key is a valid point on the curve. I'm not sure that there's an existing (public) application or script to do that.
I do not know openssh well enough to help you further.
 
Again, thanks for your help
 
You're welcome.
You can try your luck on cryptography.SE if you're looking for a script to check the validity of a point on a curve. It would surprise me if there's no cryptographer there with such a script on hand.
 

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