« first day (2534 days earlier)      last day (23 days later) » 

 
2 hours later…
12:14 PM
Lets Say A is a male and B is a female..
Both A and B are siblings
So if someone asks how is B related to A do I say brother or sister.
I always get confused with this analogy..
 
you can just say sibling? Or mention their name when you say what they are. Is this a puzzle or a genuine question?
 
In genuine case
My father's name is Arup..
So how is Arup related to Rajorshi?
Or how is Rajorshi related to Arup
Which case is the answer son and which case father?
Please explain this to me..
 
Arup is related to you as your father and you are related to Arup as his son.
 
I would probably just say "he's his dad", it would be obvious who is who
 
What’s so confusing ?
 
12:21 PM
@RajorshiKoyal You can say either "B is A's sister" or "A is B's brother".
 
So if someone asks how is B related to A how do I consider it?
 
In English we are usually comfortable letting sentences be ambiguous and be figured out based on their context
 
@RajorshiKoyal It's like: If A is like this to B, then B is the opposite
 
to be honest you could just say sister or brother and people would understand
 
At least, in my analogy
 
12:24 PM
@RajorshiKoyal Id say the Q is incomplete. Here, you can’t compare
 
Is there anyone in the chatroom with some knowledge of economics and can assist me in another room?
 
12:53 PM
1
Q: 7x7 Golomb square

Dmitry KamenetskyCan you paint $7$ cells of a $7 \times 7$ grid such that the Euclidean distance* between any pair of painted cells is distinct? Good luck! *The Euclidean distance between cells $(r_1,c_1)$ and $(r_2,c_2)$ is $\sqrt{(r_1-r_2)^2+(c_1-c_2)^2}$.

 
 
2 hours later…
2:48 PM
A is the son of P .and brother in law of T who is sister of G.B is husband of K.K has only two child,T is one of them.S is mother of A and sister of W who is husband of R.U is the brother of P
If V is the brother of A,the who is the aunt of V?
This is a typical blood relation type of a problem.
How do I solve this..
 
Is there a reason you are posting in this chatroom and not on main-site or in your room?
 
I'd advise you draw out the family tree... but also, this room isn't your personal tutoring service.
 
^
 
I am posting this on the main site.If possible please suggest me the tags for this question.
@bobble Actually it is much easier to discuss here than on main site.
That is the reason.
 
Based on your deleted message above, this looks like it's from a test of some sort.
(Although whoever's giving the test apparently isn't very proficient in English.)
 
2:52 PM
:-)
It is from a daily practice problem sheet..
Please suggest me the tags.
For this..
 
*sighs* probably , although I'm not sure if it actually qualifies as such for a main-site question.
 
(or maybe not - those tags aren't my domain of expertise)
 
2:55 PM
and this really isn't very "puzzly" in the first place
it's reading comprehension, really
 
Posted.
If any of you wish to answer please explain how to construct the family tree.
 
@bobble Yeah - that's what I was getting at when I said I wasn't sure it qualified for a main-site question.
 
I'll be quite honest; the reason I suggested main-site was that's my knee-jerk reaction now to any query in chat for help on one of those test questions
 
:P..You answer on logic grid was amazing..
your*
 
3:18 PM
2
Q: Blood relation type of problem

Rajorshi Koyal A is the son of P and brother in law of T, who is the sister of G. B is the husband of K. K has only two children, T is one of them. S is the mother of A and sister of W who is the husband of R. U is the brother of P. If V is the brother of A, then who is the aunt of V?

 
\o @BeastlyGerbil
 
Hello!
Sorry, Ive been away for a while, schools coming to an end so I've been busy with exams :)
 
you're a gerbil. eat the exams
 
I should use that excuse some time, 'sorry, I ate my homework'
But yeah, I have a bout 3 weeks and then one final set of exams and then I should be a bit more active from then :)
 
Good luck!
 
3:23 PM
Thank you! It's all a bit of a mess but not long to go now...
 
3:53 PM
How is G related to S?
Here do I write G's relation or S's relation?
Please answer this.
 
1 hour ago, by Mithical
I'd advise you draw out the family tree... but also, this room isn't your personal tutoring service.
 
4:41 PM
1
Q: Blood relation type of problem

Rajorshi Koyal A is the son of P and brother in law of T, who is the sister of G. B is the husband of K. K has only two children, T is one of them. S is the mother of A and sister of W who is the husband of R. U is the brother of P. If V is the brother of A, then who is the aunt of V? It would be great if som...

Can you help me with the second part?
 
Well, my first Puzzling post of the year! Spent... about twenty minutes on it. ;P Probably not my best work, but meh.
 
@Mithical Which one?
 
It should be on the Puzzling home page.
 
0
Q: Twinkling and shining like a star in the sky, laughing and crying - but who am I?

Mithical The words on the page Arranged in neat lines Like a play on a stage When done well - there I shine. On joyful, bright days And downcast, sad ones too When you meet someone's gaze I'll be there, clear and true. Anger burns and flares out And I'm there in the hurt If you yell , scream, and shout I...

 
 
1 hour later…
HTM
6:17 PM
Hmm, maybe the C4 is more esoteric than I thought...
CCCC hints: 1. Knowledge of ancient history may be useful... 2. ...specifically ancient Asian history.
 
Mind specifying which part of Asia? :)
 
HTM
Coming soon™
 
0
Q: Find the bound of the function

LereauLet $f : \mathbb{N} \rightarrow \mathbb{N}$ be a function satisfying $y < f(x+1) \rightarrow y < f(x)$ for every $x, y \in \mathbb{N}$. Show that this function is bounded and determine the bound.

 
HTM
7:01 PM
Mini HNQCC based off a part of this HNQ:
9
Q: Is there a deleted scene with a Jyn and Cassian kiss?

Sophie the Jedi KnightThis is probably a rumor, but I can't get it out of my head now that I've heard it. What I heard was that Rogue One initially made Jyn and Cassian's relationship romantic in nature, having them share a kiss on the beach. However, they apparently cut out this scene, preferring to keep the nature ...

Rescript a deleted scene (3)
 
7:26 PM
I'm assuming theres some sort of update bug as I'm getting all my review queue privilege notifications again?
 
HTM
@BeastlyGerbil Apparently yes
 
@HTM thanks! That would explain it
 
7:43 PM
0
Q: A burning organization... of guys?

risky mysteriesSteal my prefix and fire shall arise. Steal my suffix and someone dies. Steal my infix and differ from guys. Steal my whole and go reorganize.

 
 
1 hour later…
9:10 PM
@HTM M(u_ l_)an
 
9:34 PM
aha!
 
 
1 hour later…
10:39 PM
Oh! I really like this one :) That's clever...
 
10:50 PM
@bobble The solution for 7x7 is identical to the one in the accepted answer, and does not need to be repeated. The proof for large n is already included, it is the one line statement "there are more combinations of pairs of points than there are possible distinct distances". — Brady Gilg 8 mins ago
thoughts? (clickthrough to see answer and my comment on it)
 
11:19 PM
I would assume (though I haven't checked) that the video doesn't contain explicit proofs that the 7x7 solution is unique or that there are none for 8x8 and 9x9, but just says that computer programs found that to be the case. If so, there isn't much more that could be put into the answer. The actual 7x7 solution is the same as the one already given (since it's unique), the proof that there's only one 7x7 and no 8x8 or 9x9 is "computer says so", and [...continues]
... hmm, I was going to say "the quoted sentence does indeed prove that for n>=14 it's impossible", but trying to fill in the details it's not 100% straightforward. There are n(n-1)/2 pairs of points. The distances are all square roots of integers between 1 and (n-1)^2, and on the face of it there are more of those than pairs of points. Not all numbers between 1 and (n-1)^2 are actually possible distances, because e.g. a sum of two squares is never 3 mod 4. That observation [...continues]
... isn't enough on its own to do it, because ceiling(3/4 (n-1)^2) is still > n(n-1)/2. There's a theorem that says that for large N the number of distinct sums of two squares <= N is about k N / log N for a suitable k, and that is enough to show that for large enough n there's no solution, but to say specifically "none for n >= 14" needs something more quantitative.
(And I think that theorem is quite nontrivial; the paper in which it's proved is 7 pages long, though maybe it spends some of those 7 pages proving other things.)
 
If the proof is really a proof, then it seems an answer. If it isn't, and the answer is just saying the other is correct and providing a link to a video, then it's more of a comment than an answer.
 
I'm inclined to agree.
 
HTM
11:51 PM
@msh210 Yep, that's right!
 
@HTM good clue
 
HTM
Thanks :)
 
CCCC: Certain something's wrong, Jaq is one I sue. (2,2,4,4)
 

« first day (2534 days earlier)      last day (23 days later) »