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7:18 PM
@GIStack a little bit. If you can expand on what you're attempting I might be able to help some. One method to get a push start with geoprocessing scripts is to do a few things interactively, the "normal" way, then open the Results pane, select one of the processes and "Copy as python snippet" from the r-click context menu.
You can also "save as python script" from a model.
The command line window is only so-so useful as a tool for script writing, because it uses a different syntax from what's needed for the standalone/toolbox scripts.
The online help docs are pretty useful for looking up what's expected from what you see in the snippets and model saves, and for translating commandline syntax to script syntax and vice versa.
scroll to end to see examples and syntax differences
Another productivity tip: you can drag-n-drop from toolbox pane to command line pane, and it will automatically insert the python equivalent. Also "Toolbox > select tool > r-click > help" to quickly get to command reference page.
 
 
3 hours later…
11:00 PM
How can we protect GIS data?
- gis.stackexchange.com/questions/17556/how-can-we-protect-gis-data
I wrote an answer, then decided my answer was more of a debate, so am putting it here instead.
This is a wicked problem, not substantially different from just "how can we protect our [music, movies, articles, ...]". There is continual tension between the opposing forces of making things useful or making things secure. The more secure it is, the harder to use, the easier to use, the less secure.
I venture the only thing one can really do is a) ensure your content is identifiable as yours (watermarks, traps, unique sign-out id, etc. A suitably motivated (or bored) person will strip out or mask whatever is put in though.), b) have clear license terms of what is and isn't acceptable use, and c) aggressively pursue those who transgress the license terms. All very time consuming and expensive, and the best you can hope to achieve is to stem the tide, never win.
Just look at the entertainment industry.
I think any organization that centres it's value in the data they provide, as opposed to services built on using and interpreting the data, is facing a long and never ending battle against dissolution. And it's only going to get harder as computers continually get faster, software more more capable and sophisticated, and more people get more skilled in using them. Look at we can do with these things now, and the vast majority of computer users have not ventured farther than point, click.
 

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