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12:18 AM
土曜の夜は空いている。おやすみなさい
 
 
6 hours later…
6:10 AM
@snailplane I was intending to say "I'm going to sleep soon"
 
 
4 hours later…
10:30 AM
Does anyone know how to add furigana to an arbitrary text input field (e.g. email)? I can do it in microsoft words, but if I copy and paste the text to another place, the furigana(ruby) goes into brackets on the right of the word instead of above it.
 
Well, the place you are copying it to has to support ruby text
 
The place I'm copying it to is microsoft outlook web access
I guess it doesn't support ruby then
 
11:10 AM
@小太郎 Ah, well, I understood it! I was just curious if it was the right way to say it or not.
I don't usually try to correct people's Japanese, myself
Because I would probably get it wrong. :-)
But since you asked... I wonder if anyone else has an opinion on that phrase I pointed out.
(Oftentimes I think to myself, "this sounds strange," but it turns out to be quite normal!)
 
11:29 AM
I'd go with そろそろ寝ます
 
That sounds better to me!
I hope my ability to tell what sounds right or wrong improves. I'm hopeful because I think it's gotten less bad over the last year or so.
I've been reading a lot!
I'm still not doing as much listening practice as I should, though.
There are some free audiobooks with transcripts linked to here: rtkwiki.koohii.com/wiki/Audiobooks
 
 
3 hours later…
2:38 PM
I've noticed that most grammatical terms in Japanese make sense, so learning the names is easier if I think of (for example) 終止形 as a description rather than a thing to memorize.
I'm curious about how the name 已然形 came about. It sounds like ( 已 + ) + 形, but what exactly is 已?
Ah, I found a definition, すでに
Wikipedia says: 已然とは「すでにそうした」「すでにそうなった」の意味であり、確定条件(~ので)を表す「ば」や「ども」をつけることでできる語形であるのでこの名がある[1]。
 
已然形 is no longer relevant in modern Japanese I think
it's now called 仮定形 when used for hypothetical form
 
Yes, I've read that
Thank you for pointing it out, though
I've only read a little bit about 文語, really
 
3:13 PM
I noticed in one answer you listed five forms instead of six, leaving out 終止形
I don't really like the explanation that the 終止形 is gone and is replaced with the 連体形, mostly because it makes 連体形 nonsensical
I prefer the explanation that for verbs 終止形 and 連体形 have the same form in modern Japanese
Because even though both forms look the same, there's still two grammatical functions
It feels weird to me saying you end a sentence with the 連体形
Coincidentally I was just reading, earlier today, a PDF from that nihongoresources site you linked to, which does the same thing
(Haha, I tried to edit out some of the commas in that sentence and I ran out of time.)
 
@snailplane I've been told that nihongoresources has some unreliable information
but it's still mostly good
 
3:33 PM
@Flaw Oh, maybe so. I didn't mean to say that it was wrong though
I just find it to be a more confusing explanation.
 
Well, I've got early class tomorrow じゃそろそろ寝ます
おやすみなさい
 
Rest well!
 
 
6 hours later…
9:19 PM
My study buddy presented me with the sentence 「放っときゃいいかと思ってたが、目障りだ・・・消してやる!」
The っときゃ part threw me a bit. My guess is that it's a contraction of っておければ
I can't find any site online to look up contractions like that.
 
10:01 PM
@snailplane You are close. 放っときゃ is a very colloquial contraction of 放っておけば. There are two changes involved here: (1) -ておく (-teok-) is contracted to -とく (-tok-), and (2) the particle ば signifying a condition together with the vowel “e” preceding it is contracted into ゃ (little や). In fact, this phrase usually goes under another contraction which is not apparent from its kanji notation: colloquially, 放って is often read as ほって instead of ほうって, and therefore 放っときゃ is often read as ほっときゃ.
 

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