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7:23 AM
@NikeDattani Glad to read from you, and of our past and present constructive exchanges.
On my first quote: I was not saying more than: my understanding is that for the method to work, the integer factored must have some relation with the molecule used. I infer this is not a general factorization method applicable to any integer of comparable size. It would follow that there is no reason to believe that, with this molecules or any reasonably small collection of molecules, the method would apply to more than a vanishingly low fraction of RSA moduli.
 
7:40 AM
My second quote is trying to see if we can extend the approach of that paper, which I read as extending the result in that paper of yours by finding a larger specific integer suitable for the method.
 
7:58 AM
For reference, the crypto-SE answer where I talk about this is here. My tentative conclusion is that the experimentally successful methods for factorization of integer n with quantum computing fall into 3 categories:
- Those that as n grows are applicable to only a vanishing fraction of biprimes n, and as such can't hope to challenge RSA. I qualify the record-high n achieved in this category as stunt, with mine the king of stunts AFAIK.
- Those that are applicable to a non-vanishing fraction of biprimes n, but are combinatorial in nature. By extrapolation of their runtime, they can't hope to challenge RSA even if quantum computers became usable for large instances of Grover's algorithm or similar. The experimental record here is a currently a 6-decimal-digit n.
- Those that do use Shor's algorithm to some degree, and would challenge RSA if quantum computers became usable for large instances of that algorithm. The experimental record here is n=21, AFAIK.
 
 
3 hours later…
10:34 AM
Millions 'unwittingly tracked' by phone after vaccination to see if movements changed
 
 
10 hours later…
8:16 PM
Okay academics, I just came across something in a paper regarding key exchange and chaotic oscillators. They mentioned "classic" methodology. I made a chaotic oscillator in circuits to encrypt analog video; however, I have never heard of anyone making one digitally to do something similar. Is there a "classic reference" for a digital system where a chaotic oscillator is used for a key exchange?
(FYI, I used Chua's circuit, which is from 1983 and I can tune well enough but the signal still needs a human to determine what you are looking at because it's super lossy.) Anyway, I'm trying to determine if I'm reading snake oil.
 

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