« first day (275 days earlier)   

 
4 hours later…
11:29 AM
@MartinEnder I really wonder how you can inflate such a thing :D
 
I assume it's part of the joke. :P
Although I guess the actual surface could be made up of two rubber sheets (and some connections between them) and you could inflate the air between the two sheets.
 
@MartinEnder It'd be one sheet, wouldn't it? :)
 
you might have some trouble with actually manufacturing it like that :P
 
If you have some 4d space available you could do it without a single cut
 
 
2 hours later…
1:57 PM
Woo, cut my TREE(3) program down to 300 bytes!
 
 
3 hours later…
5:03 PM
@flawr Pump air through the bottleneck then push a cork into the space. It sort of ruins the effect though...
 
Hello @wizzwizz4
 
@SimplyBeautifulArt Hello! I think my internet has been physically damaged - there was a van trying to fix it but it hasn't helped with the frequent dropping out.
 
:( That sucks.
Well, hope it gets better soon.
 
Although now there are periods (like now) where I can type things and there's no drop-out or packet loss, so there's that.
"Now" is defined as "whenever my messages get through". :-p
 
:P
Well I'm searching for some good persuasive essay topics. Anyone got some good math-related ones?
 
5:20 PM
Why you should use Tau
or Why Set Theory should be taught in schools
 
@NathanMerrill ew, not something gross like that ;p
 
When they do, I have a brief moment where I can type stuff.
I'm not fast enough though.
@SimplyBeautifulArt Why hyperoperations should be taught in schools.
 
@wizzwizz4 x'D why do you think they should other than "they are a natural continuation of basic arithmetic operations, natural in a mathematical sense."
Oh, btw, there's a neat property I want to tell you about the Hardy Hierarchy.
H(n,a+b) = H(H(n,b),a)
From this you can prove that:
H(n,a∙ω) = H(n,a∙n) = H(n,a+a+...+a) = H(H(H(...),a),a)
So given that H(n,ω) = 2∙n = multiplication,
we can see that H(n,ω²) = recursions of multiplication = exponentiation
and in general,
H(n,ω^k) ≈ (k+1)th hyperoperation.
Assuming the 1st hyperoperation is addition, and the second being multiplication.
From there you can get the idea that H(n,ω^ω) ≈ (n+1)th hyperoperation
Apply this n times and you get ≈ Graham's sequence.
H(n,ω^(ω+1)) ≈ g_n
H(64,ω^(ω+1)) ≈ Graham's number
And that's about all I wanted to say
 
@SimplyBeautifulArt That makes sense.
You could troll them with something like "why the Busy Beaver function should be considered computable" and hand-wave about being able to apply a similar algorithm to Hash-Life to Turing Machines to reduce their computation complexity.
 
5:40 PM
@wizzwizz4 xD
 
However, that would probably be too specialist.
Then you'd actually be graded on your language use.
 
Well I'm coming up with ideas to propose
And I would I assume my professor would shoot me down on that for being way to technical.
Aha!
I could do fertilizer! I don't know why I didn't think of it already lol
 
Why ordinals are the best representation of large numbers.
 
Did some research about fertilizers in my area last year, and it'd make a decent topic anyways.
@wizzwizz4 Easy to compare two numbers, flexible, endlessly extendable and generalizable?
 
@SimplyBeautifulArt Reusing research for multiple subjects is easily the most efficient use of time.
 
5:46 PM
@wizzwizz4 x'D yeup.
Gah. Hate it when I have 50 tabs open.
 
6:02 PM
Bleh, just gotta love timezones.
Deedlit was reviewing my TREE(3) program, but he's probably not in a good time zone to do this while I'm online.
 
6:26 PM
If we abolished timezones, everybody could use local time.
You could pinpoint almost exactly where in the world somebody was using a timestamped photograph of the ISS in the night with the horizon in shot.
 
:I and this is also why I'm not one of StackExchange's developers.
 
Horizon + ISS + Timestamp + Moon would be even beter.
 
 
1 hour later…
7:48 PM
@wizzwizz4 That wouldn't solve Simply's problem though. Deediit would still be away at inconvenient times.
 
7:59 PM
@fejfo @wizzwizz4 Hm, apparently my program fails to reach TREE(3), as I had forgotten a small nit-pick in my code. :-/ need to fix it up a bit...
 
@El'endiaStarman If we all used UTC or something similar as our wake-up go-to-sleep decider, most of us would have to take melanin.
 
8:16 PM
@SimplyBeautifulArt Bugs are to be expected in a program you can't really test
 
@fejfo No, I forgot about a minor detail on the math side.
 
Is it simple enough to state it to me?
 
Actually, my program may still surpass TREE(3), but I want to be safe than sorry.
@fejfo More or less the issue is that while ψ'(Ω_1^Ω_1^Ω_1^...) would certainly surpass the level of TREE(3), it is difficult to recreate uncountable exponents using only recursive addition.
Especially with ordinal less than Ω_ω
And oh god this looks messy xD
I figured I could surpass this problem by allowing greater variety of subscripts.
But I now realize that's a lot more coding, and probably far from optimal.
I'm gonna go back to doing my homework and ponder on the problem.
 
@SimplyBeautifulArt Your program fails to reach TREE(3) because it exists in a universe where H(2, w^4) exceeds most reasonable metrics.
 
@wizzwizz4 =P Well that's why we're not allowed to run our programs so locally.
 
8:32 PM
@SimplyBeautifulArt How'd you get timesharing on God's computer? :-p
 
@wizzwizz4 I promised him I'd make larger numbers for his universe.expansion projects.
 
9:15 PM
gdaymath.com/courses/exploding-dots (Skip down to the "Lessons" sections.) When I started reading about this "exploding dots" thing, I was like "yeah, this is just typical number bases stuff". Then I was surprised by how easy division was. And then polynomials were easy too, which was a bit of a shock. The lessons ended with some really juicy problems.
 
@El'endiaStarman Hm, can I take a guess that these exploding dots are related to series? (I totally didn't open the link, but even if I did, I didn't play the video, just looked at the preview image.)
 
@SimplyBeautifulArt Stuff like Taylor series are included, yes.
 
The basic idea is that you start with some dots in some boxes, and A <- B means that you can convert B dots in one box to A dots in the box immediately to its left.
 
@El'endiaStarman Want 4 problems I came up with in the past month (or two?) which are related and may or may not involve series?
@El'endiaStarman >.> I will have to take a look at that later...
 
9:23 PM
It's a really deceptively simple idea. Very elegant for some things.
 
9:51 PM
Division is rather elegant
 
10:11 PM
Division is very elegant. I love the explanation of division in a 1<x machine.
 
10:28 PM
You must have had some bad teachers never explaining this stuff :)
 
It is all so much easier if you just start explaining it using discrete convolution.
And to speed things up you can use the DFT to turn it into a easy pointwise multiplication.
Why is this not taught in primary school?
 
@flawr *::facepalm::* what primary school did you go to?
 
@SimplyBeautifulArt I have to say all the math teaching I experienced through that time was quite bad too.
 
-_-
Honestly would've signed my future children up for that school.
 
10:31 PM
But my algebraic geometry professor always told us when introducing a new concept "it is just like in school".
@SimplyBeautifulArt Perhaps I'm gonna be teacher at some point? :D
Aw those poor kids.
 
@flawr :P
@flawr x'D
 
But I'm sure that at least I would have a lot of fun XD
 
*::facepalm::*
I may as well home school my kids
 
Anyway, cu guys!
 

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