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6:40 AM
@IanC - Are you sure?! $40 for all those pieces of tools?!! That's impossible!
 
 
2 hours later…
8:48 AM
Hi. Long time no see... whats up?
The CV boot was torn some years ago. And by laciness I didn't change it. It's the inner joint, and it's rather well protected so it isn't that bad. Anyways, now I have finally taken time to fix it (change the joint to a new one). Problem I'm having is that the new joint seems a bit... hard. The outer joint that is still ok is rather flexible. But the new joint feels almost like it's binding. It's stiff to "turn", and, it feels more like the one that I took of (that was bad).
I felt it before I greased it, but thought that it would be fine once packed. But that didn't really do much difference. Now I haven't mounted it yet because I don't want to go through the hustle of disassemble the whole axel once again.
So does anyone of you know how a new joint should feel? Could it that it just needs a couple of miles to loosen up?
 
 
5 hours later…
2:23 PM
@NarimanAsgharian I have a similar handheld (well, 2 actually - a Dremel and a non-name brand) that was around that cost as well. They are cheap bits of kit - if you can get them where you are...
 
As long as it works it is fine. I see no risks, so it is worth a try.
To be honest: Every mechanic does some shortcuts (note the wooden block under the oil pan he uses to raise the engine), bypassing the "official" way to do it.
It only depends on how you ask the question.
A "what do you think about it?" would be shot down quickly.
An "I observed method X, is it reliable or are there uncontrollable risks?" is another thing
The wooden block under the oil pan is an excellent example:

There ought to be an "official" engine support frame indicated in the (commercially available) repair manuals. You can buy that thing at the dealership (earning you rolling eyes) and you only use it to hold the engine in place when removing the engine mounts.

They need to have that item in the manual (and available through the dealership) because they cannot write "raise the engine somehow without breaking something important". I doubt that the dealership have, and use all the "official" tools.
 
3:15 PM
@NarimanAsgharian Dollar is currently very high in comparison to my currency, so it might feel very cheap for you in dollars. But in my currency it was 220 bucks :p
It was a cheaper rotary tool though, a Dremel would be more expensive
 
4:00 PM
@Martin - I think the method he used for removing the sprocket is interesting because at least it doesn't do any harm to the crankshaft even if it doesn't work.
I think he didn't do it wrong by placing a block of wood beneath the engine. I checked the manual and it also confirms this method. This is a screenshot of the manual:
I also supported the engine the same way during my timing belt replacement. However, I didn't rest the engine on jack alone. I supported the weight of the engine on several pieces of woods and bricks. Something like this:
 
4:25 PM
@RoryAlsop - A complete Dremel kit? Cheap?!! Here, I struggle to buy a single piece of ratchet! (Just a ratchet!) I can't even imagine to have those tools at such a price!! It is like a dream!
@IanC - If tools are really that cheap in your area, buy some for me too!! ;))))) It seems as if you live in heaven to afford a kit of tools quite easily!
I would love to have a FACOM ratchet with 40 cm handle. It is my dream but I can't afford it!
 
 
1 hour later…
5:35 PM
@NarimanAsgharian I think that's around £40 here
 
 
5 hours later…
10:23 PM
@NarimanAsgharian It's probably one of the very few exceptions, tools are way cheaper in America for most cases. And since I don't earn in dollars it was still not thaat cheap for me haha
Applied another coat of bondo, I think I'll be trying to finish some details on the sanding and apply primer tomorrow
 

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