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5:43 AM
@hhh Maybe you can consider feeding a multi-variable CoefficientList to an AdjacencyMatrix to form a graph... well, frankly, it's not quite clear to how you're attempting to transform the polynomials.
Hmh. Probably not quite what you want.
 
 
5 hours later…
10:34 AM
@Pickett and others. What is the JavaScript way of doing objects' values merging, like in mathematica.stackexchange.com/q/102466/5478
so, is there something like f( {a: 1, b:{b1:2}} , {a: 2, b:{b2:3}} ) which gives: {a: 2, b: {b1:2, b2: 3}}?
 
hhh
11:07 AM
@kirma cannot yet understand CoefficentList here:
 
11:32 AM
@Kuba In jQuery, I would use extend. JavaScript doesn't have functions like that built in. So the answers to questions like that are very dependent on what libraries you are using. You can of course also do it with barebones JavaScript, but the solution will be some combination of for loops, not just one function.
 
11:53 AM
@Pickett thanks, works. There is also angular.merge what does it
just found that
 
 
1 hour later…
1:11 PM
Oh, this is nice. Thanks to @RolfMertig I have an interesting quote from S. Wolfram:
> When I created Mathematica my goal was to build an environment
in which one could easily set up programs of essentially any kind.

And indeed the language that underlies Mathematica is based on
concepts more general and more fundamental than even those of
standard logic or mathematics
The answer from people that shall not be named go along these lines...
> Sorry to disappoint, but there is no reason to believe Wolfram is saying anything profound. It is just marketing hype.
and maybe another quote to the same statement
> This is just more crap from Wolfram, who long ago stopped being a
scientist in order to devote his efforts to peddling rubbish in order to
expand his bank account.
Now comes the punch line: This conversation happened 12 years ago!
 
1:35 PM
@halirutan That thread is a gem, further down:
> As I can see it, A New Kind Of Science is, apart from many other
considerations, a kind of an outstanding work of fiction; a saga,
or, a poem.
> By the way, this is why SW did not add references, that's why he
use "I" etc.
> Do you think you would like to read a kind of the following
> To be[8113], or not to be,
> That is the question[8114]
> Whether[8115] it is noble[8116]
> Stephen Wolfram wages a war, a war for intelligence, a war for
himself and for us, do you really realize it?
 
2:03 PM
@hhh I don't understand what you mean. That is just a plot of all graphs on 6 or less vertices, taken from networkx's "graph atlas". What does it have to do with polynomials?
 
@Szabolcs I think he is just looking for help brainstorming ideas for artistic visualizations of polynomials as graphs.
 
 
4 hours later…
6:24 PM
There is a function that displays an expression but is the value of another expression when used. I can't remember the name of it. Does anyone know what this is?
 
@MichaelHale Yes!!! Thanks.
@MichaelHale And that is why I could not find it. It is not in WolframLanguageData
@MichaelHale How could they leave out their own functions.
 
@Edmund Ah, interesting. I'm still in the habit of using the "see also" and guide sections of the documentation, but I like the idea of language discovery via the language itself with data paclets like WolframLanguageData.
 
6:55 PM
@MichaelHale It actually looks as if none of the Dynamic family of functions are in WolframLanguageData. Could it be coincidental?
 
@Edmund I don't follow.
MemberQ[WolframLanguageData[], #] & /@ {Entity[
   "WolframLanguageSymbol", "Dynamic"],
  Entity["WolframLanguageSymbol", "DynamicModule"]}
Gives True, True
 

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