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1:58 AM
@saraherceg Do you have more specific goals or limits for this? If you're willing to hard code 10-100 books, you can get away with not using a database. The system you've described could be set up to be binary, basically filtering a database or list based on the specified criteria, or it could do a numeric points-based system or a percentage match.
That is, if you like 400-600 page books, is a 625 page book out, or does it have a slight demerit for the query?
 
 
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7:20 AM
How to build a Global distriubtion system for travel ?
 
 
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9:59 AM
@JoelHarmon I would use a dataset from goodreads (around 10k books) in witch I added genres of the available books. I read about building a model that makes a vector based on all the features a user selected and calculate Jaccard distance between the user vector and every book. Or something like that?
 
 
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12:21 PM
@saraherceg First and most importantly, it is almost certainly a violation of Goodreads' Terms of Service and might be outright illegal to use their data, even for a personal project.
It sounds like you already have some resources on how you'd like the core algorithm to work. From my perspective, the rest is all pretty straightforward web development. Is there something more specific you have a question about?
 
 
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3:20 PM
Vicki Boykis on November 14, 2019

In Pycon in 2014, Guido van Rossum, the creator of Python and, at the time, the Benevolent Dictator For Life of the language, stood on stage in a shirt that had a large 2.8 written on it in block letters, with a big red no entry sign through it. “It’s time to move on to Python 3,” he said, telling the audience that they should start adopting the new version of the language into their workflows. 

After many years of hard work towards that goal from the core committers, and surrounding community of libraries, Python 2 is finally at end of life. January 1, 2020, according to pythonclock.org, is the drop-dead date for support of Python 2.  …

 

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