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12:01 AM
RELOAD!
[rubberduck-vba/Rubberduck] 1 opened issue.
[Zomis/Games] 5 commits. 2 issue comments. 1232 additions. 1301 deletions.
[Minesweeper] Games Played: 106, Bombs Used: 80, Moves Performed: 14523, New Users: 8
 
 
4 hours later…
4:00 AM
 
4:25 AM
A lot of stars the last few days. Only 884 more till 2000 is reached.
> Remember that there are no bonus points for using fewer character in your method calls. - Rico Mariani
 
 
7 hours later…
11:35 AM
Glad I stepped away from that discussion yesterday. Guaranteed that all these "issues" disappear within 7 days of the election.
 
12:22 PM
At the danger of starting up the discussion again ... the US police force is not really a police force. It's a collection of private military forces
The concept of a private company selling police as a service is utterly mindboggling to me as well
 
Hm, there are security firms, but city police and sheriffs aren't for hire?
You can make the case that the police force may be too militarized, though. That's a legit issue to bring up.
 
I've read more than once that police forces are paid by the arrest
oh god and sheriff elections are a thing in many places in the US...
 
I am not sure they actually get paid to do more arrests. As far as I know, there are ticket quotas that can perversely incentivize traffic stops but they're in form of fines which does make money. Arrests, OTOH, are more likely to cost the department money.
 
12:52 PM
It is a widely held belief in the US that the traffic cops are on a quota system, but every police force vociferously denies it. Arrests absolutely cost cash. Tickets bring it in.
For a while, there was a town along my commute that would have cops hidden under every overpass between the 20th and 23rd of each month like clockwork. So take the "we don't have quotas" thing with a grain of salt. ;)
 
FWIW, some police dept do acknowledge there's a quota system. Still feels like a form of taxation, though.
 
1:37 PM
IIF will evaluate both truepart and falsepart potentially causing errors. Is there a short-circuit version or does one have to write his own?
Is there a recommended pattern or name for the roll yer own version?
I mean, ShortCircuitIifBecauseNativeVbaIsStupid is pretty accurately named, but doesn't quite trip off the tongue...
 
just use normal If Else
the evaluation is because Iif is a Function, not an operator
 
But I've got a bunch o'them, and I'd like a little utility function to streamline the code:
 
so to pass an expression's value to a function you need to evaluate the expression
 
myVariable = myNullCheckingFunction(someVariable)
 
so ... no way to short circuit that with a function of your own
nullChecking is something else
 
1:40 PM
Yeah, I was just wondering if there were any suggested standards around doing that...
 
fyi Access' IIF doesn't have that problem.
 
There are more than a few standards I'm not aware of, so I thought I'd ask...
 
but in VBA, you're SOL.
 
@this the story of my life...
 
I typically use Select Case True but that's only because I find more than 2 conditions to test on.
 
1:42 PM
Is Select Case True any more efficient than If... Then... when there are only 2 cases?
 
I doubt it.
 
figured I'd ask.
off to write some code for the first time in weeks. Wish me luck.
 
The real advantage of Select Case True comes in the case where you have multiple conditions for where you want to execute same code (e.g. Case A, B: DoThis: Case C, D: DoThat: Case Else: MehWhateva) That would more efficient than a If A Or B Then ... ElseIf C Or D Then .... Else .... End If.
 
Saw that pre-edit. Was cornfused...
 
Energy Withdrawal Declined - Insufficient Caffeine Level
better deposit me some more caffeine.
 
1:47 PM
sets up single cup "this's GoFundMe caffeine campaign"
contributes 10 cents
Oh, coffee's expensive these days... throws in 40 more cents
looks around. Wonders where FreeMansMug went...
 
2:12 PM
I have finally used RD at work for the first time.; it immediately caught a ton of stupid copy-paste errors.
Now I see some things I definitely want to change.
I also want a new release now.
 
2:34 PM
@M.Doerner virtual stars for all those comments!
Gotta say, the updates to Encapsulate Field that allow me A) wrap in a private type and B) add to an existing private type are most excellent!
If only it would delete the extra lines it leaves behind...
#AskForTheStars #AcceptTheMoon
 
2:53 PM
 
^ wow. Mug, you been writing more articles and not sharing them with us?
 
3:20 PM
@FreeMan nah, he got those nice bitcoins guys to engage Twitter big shots to help us out. :-p
 
3:38 PM
what? #MustaMissedSomething
 
or just google "Twitter hack"
 
4:07 PM
huh...
> The attackers then used Twitter’s internal systems to tweet from high-profile accounts like Mr. Biden’s.
Fun, Twitter can tweet in your name from the inside. That's good to know.
> Derrick Snyder, a meteorologist in Kentucky, said in a series of tweets that the National Weather Service could not issue warnings on Twitter about a tornado in Illinois because its account, one that the company had verified, was shut down.
Don't we have systems for issuing tornado warnings that don't rely on social media? Why wouldn't they issue through the normal channels, the let people post their own notices. :(
kinda sorry I asked.
 
4:29 PM
Twitter: We are in control of our shit. Trust us.
Public: Oh yeah? What about these bitcoin tweets?
Twitter: A one time security flaw we patched with more shit.
 
I thought employee credentials were compromised.
 
 
4 hours later…
8:58 PM
> ... the difference between out and ref parameters is not widely understood.
Based on my experience outs intent specifies that within the member call that variable will be assigned. Whereas ref is a reference that may-or-mayn't have already been assigned.
Out also mandates that the parameter must be assigned a value before it returns.
Is there anything else that Naive-Iven is missing?
 
 
2 hours later…
11:21 PM
As far as I am aware, you cannot pass an initialized variable to an out parameter. Its sole purpose is to return a value out of the method.
It is a workaround for the fact that a function can have only one return value.
Now that there are value tuples in c#, it is not that useful anymore.
A ref parameter should get mutated in the method.
Moreover, an argument passed to a ref parameter must be a variable---expressions are not allowed---and the variable must be initialized beforehand.
The strangest thing are in parameters.
They pass by reference, but do not allow to mutate the parameter; they are just a performance optimization.
 
The out type parameter is useful for the TryX(key, out value) paradigm. I did a quick test...passing an initialized variable as the out parameter is acceptable to the compiler...but I think there cannot be any assumptions made about the content/value of the parameter after the function returns...it will be set to something before the function returns.
Outside of a predicate function that wants to return additional information, I definitely prefer using value tuples.
 
11:42 PM
Other languages solve the TryX use case more gracefully by returning a Maybe<T>, which had no analog in c# for a long time.
 
cool...not familiar with that. Does Maybe<T> require an implicit cast to bool or something like that?
 

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