« first day (1134 days earlier)   

12:25 AM
Contact continues but currently seems like it could do with a few more people...
 
Yeah, I'm getting ton of clues, but I'm getting none of them.
 
Having more people won't exactly help that particular problem.
But it may help the game move along a bit more.
 
Yeah, I can't pass if nobody contacts
 
 
4 hours later…
4:41 AM
@ffao how come you're back on 99 upvotes on 29-1=30?
 
Somebody undid an upvote probably
 
5:09 AM
I don't know, that answer is so awesome, why would anyone undo an upvote
 
Fixed :P
 
@ffao I mean it is the 28th best answer of all time!
 
6:10 AM
looks like it's back to 101 after the bump to the front page
 
Sid
Um, guys here is a CC I am stuck on.
Beginner of Athens (5)
Apparently the answer is ALPHA.
Which I don't seem to get from the clue.
 
I solved the numbrix btw
 
Could be a ddef.
 
@Sid sounds like a cryptic def
 
beginning of athens, in greek? seems weird
 
Sid
6:15 AM
Oh, duh.
 
or beginning of greek alphabet
 
Sid
Cryptic def, yeah.
 
So basically one needs to interpret that as "beginning letter in Greek"
 
I think it's both: Athens provides the A and the reference to Greek.
 
Oh, so it's an &lit!
That makes more sense
 
Sid
6:19 AM
For it to be an &lit, where is the wordplay beside the "A"?
 
You need to pretend A=alpha
 
"beginning of something" can mean its first letter and "something in Athens" can mean it's in Greek.
 
Sid
Ah..
Duh.
 
(You'll see that more often in "the French" or "Rousseau's cat" or "Nancy's a ..." or "Nice street".)
 
Hey, is anybody here familiar with puzzlescript?
 
6:27 AM
@Sid Here's the 15^2 page (look at 5d)
(and here's where the clue first appeared)
 
7:08 AM
Numbrix solution is up @Sconibulus
Can you confirm it's correct?
 
7:29 AM
numbrix?
 
@MOehm "Nancy's a..." giving what?
 
This user is starting to @rub me the wrong way: puzzling.stackexchange.com/users/37767/draftnba
 
Looks like an interesting profile puzzle, I'm going to attempt it :p
 
they'll post it soon, then you can attempt it
 
which user now?
 
7:35 AM
I don't know
 
@Rubio un / une: The indefinite article (that is, the equivalent to "a") used in Nancy.
 
@Rubio probably a French article, since Nancy is a city in France
 
Oh. I knew Nice, but not Nancy. thanks.
 
 
2 hours later…
10:01 AM
0
Q: Find the missing number :

Mansi ManhasFind the missing number in the following table. Answer Options are: 25 27 32 30

 
10:32 AM
Well this is the point where I start to use tools and I think I've got the C4, but o_O I'd never have gotten it without tools so... hm.
 
10:52 AM
Don't worry about it, I'm sure it's fine
 
 
1 hour later…
12:00 PM
@Sp3000 The clue's been there for something like four days. I think using tools is fine at this point.
@Wen1now Try @TheGreatEscaper?
 
Well in that case: INTRIGUE ("carry on" = love affair) = (UNTIE)* (untie "knots") restraining RIG ("dress")
 
INTRIGUE is the correct answer! Well done.
("carry on" = "engage in an affair", though, rather than turning into a noun.)
It's a rather old-fashioned sense of "intrigue", of course.
 
Ah right, I couldn't quite tell if it was a noun or verb in this context
But trust Gareth to come up with a clue with two "engage in a love affair" where I know the individual words/phrases but... not as love affairs :P
(having said that though I feel like the board game expansion "Dominion Intrigue" just made a lot more sense)
 
@_@
Well good job Gareth
 
CCCC: Sweet treat from evening of puzzles held by annoying one in Greek island (5, 7)
On a side note, thanks to Gareth I learnt that there's quite a lot of types of corsets, apparently
 
12:12 PM
@Sp3000 Glad to be of service. I expect there are a number of sites on the internet that can help with your future research on this topic.
 
lol
 
Well, at least that's how the Andy Warhol contact clue came about :P
 
I don't even know where to start with this cc
 
12:42 PM
I'd start with the island.
 
Do you think Greek Island is the def?
There are like a billion of them D:
 
Well, not necessarily Greek. There are many other islands that start with SAINT or SANTA, St. Thomas for example. They would fit the enumeration.
 
Ahhh
 
(I know already which island. :) But I haven't got anything to keep up the chain at the moment.)
 
Sneaky
 
12:52 PM
There are, of course, many Greek islands, but as far as I know not many that have names with two words.
 
True
 
The last level on this is mean
 
Sid
How is carry on=intrigue?
 
@MOehm Two words that fit 5, 7 is where I am struggling...
 
1:09 PM
The island could also be part of the wordplay. In that case, it's probably a well-known island with ashorter name.
 
Sid
Today's Guardian Cryptics has a clue: Bishop, say, tries fruit (7)
 
My first thought was Crete, which could make a word like CREME ...TE, which doesn't sound too bad for a sweet or a sweet treat.
 
Sid
The answer is apparently MANGOES. I don't understand the clue at all
 
@Sid The bishop is a chess piece or a chess MAN. It's a definition by example, hence the "say". The tries and GOES are nouns as in "Have a try/go."
 
Sid
But Fruit=Mangoes? Plural?
 
1:12 PM
Apples are fruit, aren't they?
 
I think the plural of fruit is fruit
 
Sid
bah. I had it wrong all these years, after all.
Plural of fruit=fruit. TIL.
 
although you can say fruits, if you're talking about different categories of fruit
 
In the case where you have many types of fruits, it can be fruits. It depends what you're talking about, apparently
 
@MOehm There's Saint Vincent
 
1:14 PM
it's like person vs people
err, people vs peopls
usually you say people, but if you're talking about multiple distinct categories, you use peoples
i.e. The Free Peoples of Middle Earth
English is fucking weird
 
Sid
Lol, true.
 
@n_palum Yes, but how are you going to fit in the sweet treat, the evening of puzzles, the annoying one and Greek?
 
@n_palum Saint Maarten maybe, also many Greek Islands begin with Agios
 
¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 
fyi it's Sint Maarten, slightly confusing :P
(and there's also Saint Martin?)
 
1:22 PM
There is
 
Oh, I can see an anagram of SMARTIE (but not Smarties) in Saint Maarten. Unfortunately, the island is Dutch and its name is Sint Maarten, so (4, 7).
 
two halves of the same Island I think, one being Dutch and one being... I want to say French?
 
So maybe it is sweet treat
 
I ended up landing there on the way to Anguila
 
So we need evening of puzzles, annoying one in Greek Island
 
1:23 PM
Yes, that's where the Netherlands and France have a common land border.
 
o_O
 
one in greek... enas?
 
(this is a geography lesson for me)
 
is annoying an anagrind?
 
It can be
 
1:25 PM
'annoying one in greek' sounds almost mythological, probably for Hermes or Pan
 
@Sconibulus The plural of "person" is "people". The plural of "people" is "peoples". The singular noun "people" (meaning a population with shared ethnicity, or something of the kind) is derived from the plural noun "people".
 
^ that makes more sense to me
 
but 'one in greek' could easily be just a translation
 
neo?
 
Hmm I do like the idea of getting Pan or Hermes from that
 
1:26 PM
@GarethMcCaughan yeah, that's true, but it doesn't help explain how fruit works that well
 
@Sid To "carry on" with someone is to have an affair with them. To "intrigue" with someone can also have that meaning.
@Sconibulus I'm not quite sure why the explanation of person/people/peoples needs to have anything to do with fruit.
 
Sid
as in verb?
 
Verb in both cases, yes.
 
Fish can be a singular count noun, and its usual plural is also fish. Fruit as a singular count noun has the plural of fruits.
However, both fish and fruit more commonly appear as noncount nouns, which do not have plurals.
When do you use the plural count noun fruits? You use fruits to refer to different species of fruit. However, fruits as a plural count noun as in these sentences is much less frequent than fruit as a noncount noun.
 
I think the plural of fruit-as-count-noun can also be "fruit". The question "How many fruit did you get?" when someone has just been shopping doesn't seem an ill-formed one.
 
1:37 PM
ah, but it would be "how much fruit".
 
Both statements are accurate, how much and how many are both fine. Although, many implies types whereas much implies amount.
 
i have never hearth how many fruit, it sounds wrong for some reason
heard
 
Sid
isn't much for uncountable nouns while many for countable nouns? Or am I just mistaken?
 
yes, thats what i thought
 
Hullo.
 
1:45 PM
hello TGE!
 
Hullo Gareth!
 
Sid
Good Evening TGE!
 
Hiya Sid!
 
Sid
Your game is too hard
 
baHahahAhahahaah that thing
 
1:46 PM
@thecoder16 yes, "how many fruit" is unusual but it's not (I think) impossible. "Go and buy some apples and pears. I need at least six." ... "So, how many fruit did you get?"
 
Its at least a few years old
 
It's pretty good, though. Difficult, but rewarding.
 
and of course it's carefully crafted to look like it's a few decades old.
 
@GarethMcCaughan i don't think that works. many implies quantity. fruit itself is already plural.
 
That's mostly PuzzleScript @GarethMcCaughan :P
 
1:48 PM
@thecoder16 "Fruit" is both singular and plural.
 
Sid
Now that I think about it, a decade back is 2007. Huh, it doesn't feel that way.
 
I think it'd be "How much fruit did you get" not how many
 
In any case, I don't see how you get from "fruit is already plural" to "you can't ask how many fruit". "Berries" is plural but you can ask "how many berries?".
 
@GarethMcCaughan Yeah, the game engine he used doesn't really allow super fancy graphics haha
 
@GarethMcCaughan Berries is the plural, the singular is berry
 
1:49 PM
To me, "how much fruit" is answered in kilos or litres or something (a small basketful, enough for a pavlova, enough to last us a couple of days) whereas "how many fruit" is answered with a number (six, but one of them's rather small).
 
here i am on the third level, and i've managed to blockade myself into a box
now i can't do anything lmao
 
@n_palum What did I say that gave the impression that I am not aware that "berries" is the plural of "berry"?
@thecoder16 Yes you can, you can press Z.
 
Eh.. how much could be answered with both imo, how many fruit sounds weird to me
 
@thecoder16 The undo button works wonders
 
well i meant game wise
ii'm trying not to undo :P
 
1:50 PM
@GarethMcCaughan I don't see how you get from "fruit is already plural" to "you can't ask how many fruit". "Berries" is plural but you can ask "how many berries?".
 
@thecoder16 Succumb to the need of it, I'm sure you'll need to.
 
You will not be able to do it without undoing.
 
giggles
 
challenge accepted
 
fruit can be singular and plural, but berries cannot
 
1:50 PM
besides that first attempt, of course :P
 
@n_palum What did I say that gave the impression that I had forgotten writing that?
 
@Deusovi I have, after I had already solved all the puzzles though.
 
Sid
Right, now I need to concentrate on level 5..
 
I feel like it'd be easy to slip up, even after knowing the solutions.
 
Idk just the wording :P I wasn't meaning to imply you weren't aware, I am very aware of your word expertise
 
1:52 PM
@Deusovi my brain works in mysterious ways.
 
No ones made progress on the knights kuromasu??
I might have to give it a serious crack this weekend :P
 
arguing with gareth about words is like trying to cut diamond with a wooden saw. if you cut anywhere deep, it will be into your own skin.
 
I've tried, but I get to spots where I have to guess pretty quickly
 
Lmao @thecoder16
 
it's true.
 
2:05 PM
I never disagreed with ya :P
I probably won't get into any solving action until after I'm done with my grid thingo
 

« first day (1134 days earlier)