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3:08 PM
My 6x40 stage 1 run with B1=5e9 finished without finding a factor of 4^444 + 3. On to stage 2!
 
 
1 hour later…
4:18 PM
Hi Peter.
 
4:30 PM
@Peter Very good. If we compare $\Phi_{15}$ with $\Phi_{24}$ then $\Phi_{24}$ obviously generates more primes in the same range, right?
@hardmath You mentioned to send you the residues from B1 results to then prepare fast B2 operations. Is this done with GMP-ECM 'save' option?
 
4:56 PM
@Peter I have no idea why $k=-21$ generates more primes.
 
5:24 PM
@MartinHopf Yes, I was running six stage 1 processes simultaneously, as these take comparatively little memory. The stage 2 process is faster (half an hour rather than 4.3 hours for stage 1), but requires almost all of my RAM. So that the stage 1 processes which took a little more than a week require a little less than a week to complete in stage 2.
I used the -save option in stage 1 and the -resume option of GMP-ECM in stage 2.
 
@hardmath OK. What is the proper command line input in GMP-ECM so one can get a 'save' file for you to process?
 
5:52 PM
@MartinHopf Hi
We have $\varphi(15)=\varphi(24)=8$, so it is no surprise that $\phi_{24}$ produces more primes than $\phi_{15}$
 
6:23 PM
@MartinHopf You are (IRC) on Windows, but the command line interface should be similar to this:
ecm -save fillename -c 40 5e9 1
Of course filename is a placeholder for whatever file name you want to use. The -c 40 causes the program to repeat forty times (may be too much for your patience), the 5e9 is the B1 parameter, and the trailing 1 sets B2 so low that stage 2 will not actually run.
 

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