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1:31 AM
@Randal'Thor it's more that they have written documentation of their racism.
Of course, who gets the label "racist" and "sexist" often has a lot to do with politics.
For example, JKR is probably the last author people would accuse of racism, but "Cho Chang" is literally a made up name.
Or Isaac Asimov: pretty much the only thing this dude did at science fiction conventions was harass woman, but for some reason he has a reputation for being "progressive" or "feminist"
And this shows in his writing: his female characters are either nonexistent or stereotypes.
 
Or, famously, Orson Scott Card.
 
@Catija that's a little more complicated, because if you look at his writing, you can see a shift in his portrayal of queer characters as he gets older.
Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings is incredibly racist as well, to the point where he's using the exact same language used to justify slavery/genocide
But if you look at his later writings, his writing becomes more tolerant.
It's important to understand that you can enjoy literature while also criticising it. (stolen from Anita Sarkeesian)
I also think that for promotional material of the site, it seems fair to find the few authors who aren't writing stuff like this.
 
1:48 AM
My understanding is pretty limited on either point but I think that if he really had changed his beliefs, there would not have been as many people in the LGBT community boycotting the film's release. I think I remember recent statements that showed he still believed those things, even if he was kinder in his books.
 
@Catija shift towards being less kind.
I'm not trying to defend his beliefs.
 
I didn't think you were. I'm just stating that I'm not informed but that what information I have seemed not to agree with what you were saying.
 
@Catija I'm saying that his portrayals of queer characters were kinder/more nuanced when he started writing than his portrayals in his later books.
So I'm not sure how your information contradicts that.
 
Oh, I see. I missed that. You said that Tolkein was more tolerant but didn't say which direction Card went, so I assumed you were saying the same thing about both of them.
 
@Catija no, Card went the opposite direction.
 
1:55 AM
You just say "you see a shift"... not in which direction.
 
This is just in his published fiction, of course, I don't know anything about his personal writings.
 
Yes, but I was reading quickly and missed it. Please excuse my egregious blunder, I am only human...
 
@Catija I was typing quickly :)
 
 
2 hours later…
3:44 AM
#janeausten200 #JaneAusten #emma #illustration An illustration from 'Emma' with @OUPChildrens on the Jane Austen An… https://twitter.com/i/web/status/887305757686984705
 
 
4 hours later…
7:59 AM
Oooh, Gaiman's Norse Mythology has arrived and is now in the cataloging department.
 
Homage to Black Women Poets, 1984, by Elizabeth Catlett #womensart https://t.co/08NA9MdEAI
 
 
5 hours later…
12:44 PM
1
Q: The meaning of "The rest is silence" in "Hamlet"

ΥΣΕΡ26328Hamlet's very last words are The rest is silence. What do they actually mean? This being Shakespeare, I reckon the significance of these words cannot be only the banal comparison between death and silence. I wonder if these words have a theological connotation, too, which would not be surp...

 
@Bookworm Well, @Hamlet, what did you mean? ;-)
 
1:55 PM
@Randal'Thor what do you think?
Hint: is the argument this post makes persuasive? Or does it lack any actual data, and is it just an assertion followed by some speculation.
 
@Hamlet I think either it's not true or the religion issue is much bigger than the poster is making it sound.
But I wasn't sure enough to downvote.
 
2:13 PM
truth isn't independent of argument.
Something to consider when voting on answers.
 
@Gallifreyan Nice. Enjoy!
A couple of things about your Christie answer, @Randal'Thor, that you might find interesting (but won't necessarily fit in the answer). Complex Jewish last names were often changed on immigration to America through Ellis Island, where the officers didn't always know Yiddish/German/Hebrew/Polish or whatever, and filled in last names to the best of their ability.
 
...and first names, sometimes
 
There's a somewhat famous rabbi named Rabbi Daniel Mechanic. In one of his lectures, he mentions that his grandfather came through Ellis Island. When asked what he did for a living, he said "Mechanech" (מחנך = educator), and now the family is called Mechanic. (Rabbi Daniel Mechanic is still a mechanech)
@Mithrandir Yep. Rand's answer discussed last names, though. Specifically "Cohen."
 
Yeah, I see
Blame all the Ellis Island people :)
 
On the topic of Cohen, there's another famous rabbi named Rabbi Quinn, which I'm sure registers to most people as an Irish last name, but it's actually a mutation of the last name "Cohen" (or so I'm told).
@Mithrandir Always.
A friend of mine with the last name "Gertz" told me that their last name was truncated on Ellis Island from "Gertzenstein" or something equally long and hideous :p
 
 
2 hours later…
4:36 PM
0
Q: Why does O'Brien claim that the party didn't believe in solipsism?

EJoshuaSIn 1984, O'Brien claims that the party's philosophy is not solipsism. Why does he claim that? Was he telling the truth, and how does the party's philosophy actually differ from solipsism?

0
Q: Why wasn't O'Brien considered a thought criminal?

EJoshuaSGiven that O'Brien shows a high level of awareness of the Party's deceptiveness and malice (e.g. the fact that he admitted to being involved in creating and promoting the Goldstein myth), to what extent does he actually believe in the system himself? Why wasn't he considered a thought criminal? O...

 
 
1 hour later…
5:57 PM
Well, if nothing else, this prompted me to read up on Ezra Pound. Seen plenty of quotes, never knew about the treason & antisemitism. — Shog9 ♦ 1 hour ago
Heh
 
6:26 PM
#JaneAusten early #newspapers reviews of her #novels http://blog.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk/2012/12/16/jane-austen-imitated-by-pd-james-blog-4-by-edmund-king/
 
7:22 PM
DWAITAS is an interesting game engine. Not the system I've chosen to use (that's Fate Accelerated) but I've lifted some ideas from it for my Doctor Who games.
Actually, I'm using DWAITAS style initiative in my Stargate game too.
(Instead of "Who's fastest?" or "Who has the element of surprise?" turn order in Doctor Who Adventures in Time and Space is determined by what you're doing: talkers go first, followed by runners, doers, and fighters.)
 
7:35 PM
I have no idea what any of this means :D
But I like that and are among top tags.
Oh , that guy - he is ahead of again!
 
7:56 PM
0
Q: What motivated the choice of those folk songs for the soundtrack of "The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt"?

GallifreyanWhile writing the answer for What existing songs, if any, was the soundtrack of “The Witcher 3: Wild Hunt” based on? on SFF, I learned that the songs that had any lyrics were mostly (if not all of them) inspired by existing songs, many of them folk songs. Some of those include "Bonny at Morn", ...

 
You know what constantly freaks me out when reading novels of almost any kind? How long dawn and dusk take.
Muddy footprints of a chicken (fowl) lazily meander across one full double page spread in Matthew’s Bible,1537… https://twitter.com/i/web/status/887407649872064512
 
8:13 PM
0
Q: Is there really a nuclear war in the world of The Lord of the Flies

KittenWithAWhipIn The Lord of the Flies, it is pretty clear that there is some sort of war going on outside of the island (the dogfight that leads to the dead pilot, the naval ship that rescues the boys at the end, the evvacuation of the wars). The vibe I got was that it was WW2. It wasn't explicit, but the boo...

 
8:48 PM
9 questions until we hit 1000 questions.
 
 
2 hours later…
10:48 PM
@Shokhet Interesting but probably not relevant to that question. I haven't read the book, but I'd guess it's set in Britain or at least somewhere in Europe, rather than in America.
Mind you, a similar thing happened here with various groups. That's why so many people in Wales have the surname Evans: census takers in the 19th century were like "what's your surname? Llyllwffywll ... oh, soddit, we'll just put down Evans".
 

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