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12:00 AM
so, "kanji vs. kana" should be spelling or orthography?
 
Um.
さあ
Do you think "writing-system" is easier to understand than "orthography"?
Or is there a better way to put it?
Orthography doesn't seem like a difficult word to me, but other people are saying it is
 
I never thought orthography was a difficult word
(and we don't have a word like that in German, so I must have picked it up somewhere)
I don't think writing-system and spelling are enough for all questions about orthography... But that may just be my personal bias.
 
Well, orthography is lit. 'correct writing'―the way of writing accepted as standard
In theory, it encompasses spelling / 仮名遣い and other issues related to writing
I think 正書法 might be a rarer word in Japanese than orthography in English
I'm not sure. Orthography seems common to me because I read about / discuss language all the time.
But in the Corpus of Contemporary American English, orthography is about the 40,000th most common word.
With orthographic around 32,000th.
正書法 is surprisingly frequent in the Japanese Wikipedia corpus, but it doesn't even show up in my other word frequency lists
 
is 40,000th "common"?
 
No
A college-educated speaker is estimated to only know around 35,000 words to begin with
 
12:13 AM
Hm...
I did a test like that somewhere =)
I remember now
 
Words around 40,000th in the list include prolactin, dotage, banyan, corporeality, anthracite, ingress, voile, alopecia
 
yeah, I don't even know half of those...
 
And doo-wop! ;-)
Would it have been better if I edited their question using entirely kana, instead of using kanji+furigana?
@Earthliŋ If you look at the list and you scroll way down, you'll find that you still recognize words, but less and less often
So I recognize plenty of words around #40,000, but there are also plenty I don't recognize
Like, #39999 is funnyman
Glassmaker is next to orthography on the list!
Maybe those seem like easy words, even though they're not particularly common, because they're transparent compounds (a glassmaker is a glass maker, a funnyman is a funny man)
 
did you know dotage, banyan, voile?
 
Yes, no, no
 
12:29 AM
OK =)
anything to add?
 
Oh, you're the best! :-)
 
Read it first!
I wasn't sure whether to include a picture of the small Q in this Akinaga article, which just looks like published "lecture notes". The quality is pretty bad:
@snailboat I really just typed up your comments in chat...
 
 
2 hours later…
2:51 AM
I think @Dono mentioned he was active in the Unicode Consortium. Is this what a proposal should look like? (Or should I try the mailing list instead?)
 
3:06 AM
@Earthliŋ Are you asking Dono?
I don't think pings work if they haven't been in chat recently, but maybe he'll see it anyway (RSS?) :-)
 
 
2 hours later…
5:03 AM
シンガポールのお土産に
「香味」というものをもらいました
Fragrance Foodstuff Pte Ltd って書いてあって
一個ずつに、漢字で
何か書かれています
一つはわかります。「緑茶」だと思います。左上の。
右上は、「芋泥」って書いてあるので、何かの「イモ」のあんこみたいなのが入っているのかな、と
 
蓮+艹容
 
左下は、「豆沙」だから、何かの「マメ」のあんこみたいなのがはいってるのかな
と思うんですが、
何だろう・・・
蓮は、はす?
れんこんとか・・
なんだろう・・でも、私、実は、
あんこ嫌いなのよね・・・ww
@Flawさんは、
知っているかしら
 
 
1 hour later…
6:23 AM
違った!
「香味」って会社の名前みたいです
これも
「香味」「おいしい」
って書かれていて
↑裏面。
何なのかが不明。
原材料も不明
スナックみたいな・・
エビのような、魚のような、肉のような・・
天かすのような気も・・
 
@Schoko 干しでんぶでは?
田麩(でんぶ)は、魚肉または畜肉加工品のひとつ。佃煮の一種。日本では魚肉を使うことが多く、江戸前寿司の店ではおぼろと称するほか、一部では力煮(ちからに)ともいう。中国や台湾では豚肉を使うことが多いが、鶏肉、牛肉を使うものもある。 == 日本の田麩 == 日本の田麩は魚肉を使うことが多い。三枚におろした魚をゆで、骨や皮を取り除いた後、圧搾して水気をしぼってから焙炉にかけてもみくだき、擂り鉢で軽くすりほぐす。その後、鍋に移して、酒・みりん・砂糖・塩で調味し煎りあげる。鯛などの白身魚を使用したものに食紅を加えて薄紅色に色付けすることもある。薄紅色のものは、その色から「桜でんぶ」と呼ばれる。日本では魚肉田麩をご飯に振りかけるほか、ちらし寿司や巻き寿司の具とする。旧日本陸軍が開発・採用した携帯糧食である「圧搾口糧」には副食品として、調味した削り節をブロック状に押し固めた「圧搾田麩」が添えられていた。 伝説によれば、京のあたりの貞婦が、病気で食の進まない夫のために、産土神の諭しにしたがって、土佐節を粉にして、酒と醤油とで味をととのえ供したところ、夫の食欲は進んで病気もなおった。そして自分でも試み、人にもわけたのが初めであるという。もしこれが事実となんらかの関係があるとすれば、おそらく田麩のおこりはカツオであろうという。 北海道の一部の地域などでは、単に そぼろ と呼ぶ場合がある。 ...
@Schoko こしあん
翡翠は抹茶餡だそうです
@Earthliŋ oh, "keigo" translates into "honorific speech"... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honorific_speech_in_Japanese
but I thought we usually called them "(grammatical) honorifics"
 
6:48 AM
I don't know how to tag this question: japanese.stackexchange.com/q/26085/1478
 
@snailboat "spelling" translates 仮名遣い!
it's understandable because only kana is phonetic letters in Japanese, but it somehow strikes me as odd...
 
@broccoliforest I didn't mean to imply that spelling = 仮名遣い
 
@snailboat phew :)
 
I'm sorry, sometimes I'm not very clear :-)
 
@snailboat I only knew ingress because there's a game has the same name
 
6:56 AM
Oh! I don't know that game
 
@snailboat maybe ?
 
I know ingress from technical contexts, like signal ingress
 
Oh god :-) But I already know I'm bad at Japanese! :-)
Ooh, 外来語! :-)
 
they said my Japanese vocabulary is around 65800 words
yay!
 
7:06 AM
I remember seeing another one where you had to pick the right definition
 
7
Q: Is there an order of adjectives in Japanese?

Leo KingIn English, if we have multiple adjectives modifying a noun, there is a preferred order for those adjectives, for example: nice long red car *nice red long car *long red nice car I was wondering if there are similar restrictions in Japanese. For example, take the following three s...

I think OP is mixing up ~くて~くて~い and ~い~い~い pattern
 
7:25 AM
I see that the answer doesn't actually comment on the three examples
 
あなたの推定語彙力は42840(±4087)語でした。
あなたには推定17640(±1683)語の、理解のあやしい語彙があります。
I answered 50問 course
it needs much concentration because there are a lot of trap choices
 
Much is becoming a negative polarity item in Modern English, although right now the distribution is kind of complicated. Most people would say a lot of concentration instead
Very much works in affirmative sentences
> 1. I don't like ice cream much.
> 2. I don't like ice cream very much.
> 3. *I like ice cream much.
> 4. I like ice cream very much.
But
Oops, have to finish typing that later :-)
 
 
3 hours later…
10:10 AM
@snailboat Well, actually I was asking you, but you didn't say anything =)
 
Oh! Well, I don't know much about Unicode proposals.
And I am not a member of the Unicode Consortium.
 
@broccoliforest I thought that keigo → honorific speech and honorifics = honorific affixes ← 敬称, so that "honorifics" doesn't include other parts of keigo, like ご覧になる etc. and does include ~君 or ~ちゃん which aren't necessarily very characteristic of keigo
The Japanese language uses a broad array of honorific suffixes for addressing or referring to people, for example San as in Aman-san. These honorifics are often gender-neutral, but some imply a more feminine context (such as "-chan") while others imply a more masculine one (such as "-kun"). These honorifics are used as suffixes that attach to the end of people's names, and can be applied to either the first or last name depending on which is given. In situations where both the first and last names are spoken, the suffix is attached to whichever comes last in the word order. While these honorifics...
@snailboat Dono seems to be around, although he hasn't posted anything in a long time...
@broccoliforest I don't think the test is very good, at least not for foreigners. I'm missing lots of very basic Japanese vocabulary, but the test seems to assume I know 55800 Japanese words, probably only because I know what parallax means...
 
10:36 AM
@Earthliŋ Dono is around! He just posted a new meta thread! :-) Did you see it?
@Earthliŋ Yes, I get that impression too. People use "honorifics" (as a count noun) in English to describe things like o- and go- and -san
Is that a little strange?
I don't know what the word for 「さん」「さま」「ちゃん」「ちゃま」「くん」「どの」「し」 and so on is in Japanese.
Do all of those fall under 敬称?
Maybe those would be "titles" in English?
So do those count as part of 敬語 . . . ?
 
11:02 AM
@broccoliforest きゃっ、ありがとうございます!
さすが~
 
 
7 hours later…
6:06 PM
@snailboat I hadn't, thank you!
 

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