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12:28 AM
3
Q: Quick questions about pronouns in a sentence

EigoI'm confused when it comes to writing the following: "..., I bought from my one of the sweet sweet friends" vs "...., I bought from one of my sweet sweet friends" Neither me or my partner is native in the English language. Could someone elaborate how I should think when it comes to using pronoun...

A very good elementary question, and I have no answer. I think there no no good answer either.
 
1:02 AM
@Man_From_India Well, "my one of the sweet sweet friends" is grammatical but probably not what they want to say.
 
1:13 AM
@snailplane good morning Snail.
So there is a difference in meaning between "my one of the sweet friends" and "one of my sweet friends"?
 
Yes, definitely. The former is very unlikely to be felicitous.
First, you must have already mentioned sweet friends somewhere to license the. Second, my doesn't have the same range of meanings in that position. It sounds like you own one of the friends, which is strange.
So you would need quite an odd context for it to make sense, although it's grammatical.
I have a very strong suspicion that it's not what the OP intended to say :-)
 
Please don't take it as an argument. But when the position of "my" changes from before "one" in "my one of the sweet friends" to after "of" in "one of my sweet friends", "my" still can mean a sense of "owening".
 
> A trivet /ˈtrɪvᵻt/ is an object placed between a serving dish or bowl, and a dining table, usually to protect the table from heat damage.
I thought it was "try vet"
Curious
 
1:30 AM
@Man_From_India Yes, it can. I agree with you. But it wouldn't normally be interpreted that way.
That's why I was talking about a difference in the range of meanings.
 
Namaste @CowperKettle
 
@Man_From_India Good morning, Man ji (0:
 
@snailplane I really have trouble seeing the difference :(
 
Oh, privet is also pronounced "pree vit**
 
@Man_From_India Hmm, well, we'd need a context where my one of the sweet friends makes sense, and that context is rather hard to invent.
Without a context it's difficult to say exactly how my would be interpreted, but I don't think it has the same interpretation available in that position.
 
1:46 AM
@snailplane I have to think about it with some time in hand. Thanks by the way :-)
 
> Chaynik dolgo ne ostyvayet (Kettle long not cool down)
> Chaynik dolgo ostyvayet (Kettle long cool down)
These two sentences mean exactly the same in Russian
"It takes long for the kettle to cool down"
 
 
2 hours later…
4:03 AM
@snailplane Regarding our previous discussion about modifier and determiner, it's true that a determinitive functions as determiner and that is very different from modifiers. But there are few determinitive that are modifiers.
> All the foods are spoiled.
Here determinitive all is an external modifier.
> Those six boys are very naughty.
Here determinitive six is an internal modifier.
But in both cases the and those are determiner (function).
 
4:21 AM
And as for appositive modifier, they only occur in NP structure.
 
5:09 AM
> The volume of culture fluid after the 3rd cycle of filtration is 1003 L. Limits: 920-1000 L. The deviation was detected upon examination of the Batch Record.
I wonder if we really use the word "limits" here. I mean, is it the most often-used word.
Or maybe we use "specified range" or something like that.
I'm not sure how to pose a question about this on ELL
 
 
2 hours later…
7:31 AM
Funny. "Trivet " has three legs. "tri" is three, I think. Vet is from Latin "ped" (a leg), they say. The pronunciation hasn't changed through years.
 
7:45 AM
> three-legged iron stand, 12c., trefet, probably from a noun use of Latin tripedem (nominative tripes) "three-footed," from tri- "three" (see three) + pes "foot" (from PIE root *ped- "foot").
Таган — подставка для котла или иной посуды, позволяющая готовить пищу на открытом огне Таган в архитектуре — то же, что и кронштейн. Таган — село в Чановском районе Новосибирской области Таган — река в Новосибирской и Томской областях Таган — болото в Томском районе Томской области Таган, Атаджан — туркменский писатель Таган, Галимьян Гирфанович (1892—1948) — башкирский этнограф == Примечания… ==
 
 
2 hours later…
9:32 AM
Wow! It's the first time I don't see anyone here.
Summertime...
 
 
7 hours later…
4:28 PM
Just came across a sentence:
> His clothes never survived long intact.
Does it sound normal if we take out the adverb long and keep it at the end?
 
 
3 hours later…
7:38 PM
> The plant will make products containing a minimum amount of impurities.
I wonder if this sounds natural.
The intended meaning is: the amount of impurities in the plant's output will be minimized.
@Man_From_India Interesting question.
 
8:00 PM
@Man_From_India I would say "His clothes never stayed intact for long." 'Survived' and 'intact' seem redundant to me.
@CowperKettle I think it's strange also - it seems like they will never make something too pure.
Maybe "The plant will make products with minimal impurities." but I'm not crazy about that either. What is the context surrounding the sentence?
 
@ColleenV The new set of equipment will remove all sulfur compounds from the refined oil, making it 99.8% free of sulfur in any form.
So I'll rephrase it to "The new equipment will allow the plant to bring the impurity content to a minimum".
Thank your for the comment!
Good night!
 
@CowperKettle G'night!
@CowperKettle You could say "minimize impurity content" as well
or rather "minimize impurities"
 

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