« first day (1843 days earlier)   

12:58 PM
alright, i'll succumb to the peer pressure :P
 
 
1 hour later…
2:19 PM
@Silverfish: ... no neat adverbial form.
 
3:01 PM
@Scortchi Quite right! Though there isn't a neat adjectival form I can see either, thinking about it, unless "t" is itself adjective and adverb.
 
 
1 hour later…
4:08 PM
@Andy, contratulations on your stewardship.
2
 
4:30 PM
Thanks a lot gung! you know best how long this one took :-)
 
4:59 PM
@Silverfish: In "t distribution", or "Weibull distribution", "t" & "Weibull" are nouns being used attributively as adjectives. Fair enough, but give some people an inch & they'll take a mile, so we see "t distributed" & "Weibull distributed" - with "t" & "Weibull" as adverbs - now & again. Nevertheless the possessive modifier "Student's" is a strong enough reminder of "t"s true role that to write "Student's t distributed" really needs a brass neck or a tin ear. What about "t-ishly distributed"?
 
 
1 hour later…
6:19 PM
@scortchi I have occasionally seen "Student-t distributed", with the hyphen characteristic of a compound attributive noun.
 
 
3 hours later…
8:52 PM
 
9:48 PM
@Silverfish: Hmm ... I always thought of it as "Student's [t distribution]" rather than "[Student's t] distribution"].
 
10:39 PM
@scortchi Yes, that is how I would parse it as well. And it's funny how the "'s" disappeared. I imagine "Student-t distributed" is non-standard but I've certainly seen it. In contrast I can't recall seeing (and google doesn't pick up any substantial numbers of) "Snedecor's F distributed" or "Snedecor-F distributed" or similar (though admittedly even "Snedecor's F distribution" is fairly rare).
 
11:18 PM
@Silverfish: Well I tried to answer it. An enjoyable opportunity to be pedantic.
 

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