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12:01 AM
Let them eat brioche!
 
12:12 AM
Random question: Do you prefer cooking on gas stovetops or electric stovetops?
 
Gas!
Gas has two disadvantages, neither of which matter during cooking:
 
For what reasons?
 
1. More dangerous for old people or if you leave the gas on without a flame.
2. Harder to clean.
 
GAS!
I like the instant response.
 
I hear fairly good things about induction, but it's still slower than gas, and you can't use all pans on it.
@Jolenealaska Same.
 
12:14 AM
What makes gas so preferable?
 
It's fast, mainly.
 
I'm pretty good at managing electric, but I love the rare occasions I have to cook on gas.
 
And it's easier to tell how hot your stove is at a glance.
Most people have gas here.
A gas stove is also cheaper than electric.
Both the fuel and the purchase of the stove.
 
@NicoleRae Very few serious cooks will tell you that they prefer electric.
 
But restaurants have these huge electric plates, right?
Where the centre is hotter than the edges.
Not feasible at home.
 
12:17 AM
Ah. I was just curious.
The house I lived in previously had a gas stove, but the one I'm in now is electric. But we'll be moving soon also.
I liked the gas stove at my previous house a lot better.
I work at a banquet hall and we use large gas burners there, not electric plates. But that's just a small business. Chain restaurants may do it differently.
 
Ah I see.
I'm actually not sure what kind of restaurants use those electric plates. Not small restaurants. I don't know about chain restaurants, I never eat at any—unless I don't know they are a chain hehe.
Supposedly medium-sized, good restaurants use plates. Sometimes. I don't know.
@NicoleRae What kind of stove will your new house have?
 
@Cerberus Gas has more than those disadvantages. It wastes more heat out the sides, so you have to be more careful grabbing pots, and it heats up the kitchen more.
 
@Jefromi Right, that is true.
 
@Cerberus Don't know. We are still looking. Our lease is up in a couple months.
 
@Jefromi But in practice those are less significant, I would say. Depends on your house, perhaps.
 
12:24 AM
I suppose I'd care about the last part less if I weren't from places like California and Texas - hot kitchens in the summer are awful.
I avoid using the oven in the summer.
 
@NicoleRae OK if I were rich, I'd consider induction. Otherwise, I'd go for gas.
 
So an extra hot stove... not super exciting.
 
I thought y'all had A/C everywhere?
 
It definitely heats up the kitchen more. It also doesn't get super-hot, which is sometimes (rarely) desirable.
 
Our climate is cool. Only a few hot weeks in summer.
 
12:25 AM
Yeah, I was getting to that - it also just takes longer to boil a pot of water, unless you have a super turbo gas stove.
 
@Jolenealaska Huh, what? Gas?
 
Electric gets hotter
 
@Jefromi Huh?
But gas is super fast!
 
@Cerberus Definitely not rich. :p So hopefully we can have a gas one next.
 
@Cerberus It's responsive - the power changes as soon as you tell it to.
 
12:26 AM
@NicoleRae Haha OK.
 
But the max heat output (the part that actually goes into the pot, not the waste heat) is often not as high.
 
you can boil a big pot of water faster with electric.
 
@Jefromi And also hot enough to make metal glow red...
@Jolenealaska Oh that's odd, that goes counter to my intuition...but then I've never used electric much.
But then surely the difference in speed will be minimal?
 
@Cerberus Electric does that too. Anecdotally, basically every gas stove I've boiled water on was noticeably slower than the electric stoves I've had in my apartments, and those aren't high-end stoves.
 
Electric on high (that's assuming a coil stove) gets significantly hotter than gas on high.
 
12:28 AM
I've seen plenty of people saying this on the internet too.
 
@Jefromi Hmm it also depends on the kind of gas and the pressure and the size of the burner.
 
My parents have a very high end gas stove (not commercial). I have a $300 electric. Mine gets way hotter.
 
@Cerberus Like I said, if you have a really fancy one, it can compete (though it'll be throwing that much more heat into your kitchen). But generally if you get a gas stove and an electric stove in a similar cheap-ish price range, like you tend to in apartments, the electric will be way way way hotter at max.
 
That would be sweet!
 
12:29 AM
Apparently, some electric stoves have a special super-hot burner like the above, on gas.
@Jefromi But...a large burner is not necessarily expensive. It's just larger.
 
But... you can't just take a given stove and make the burner bigger. I'm talking about the big burner on a typical gas stove.
@Cerberus I suspect that's more about responsive heat, for sauteeing and such, not about boiling water quickly.
 
@Jefromi I'm not sure what you mean.
 
I'd trade my electric for gas in a heartbeat, but I'd miss my electric when when doing blackened stuff or making spaghetti.
 
@Jefromi It is indeed not meant for boiling water, mainly because it would be unnecessary and inefficient. But it does get super hot.
 
@Cerberus So do the other burneres. It just gets hot fast.
 
12:33 AM
This is quite common here.
 
Let me try one more time. If you get a typical gas stove, and a typical electric stove, in similar price ranges, and use the largest burner on both of them to boil the same amount of water, I can basically guarantee you that the electric stove will do it faster.
I know it has a big burner. It's still slower.
 
I don't know what's typical.
 
You can't turn it up past the max, you can't make the burner bigger than it already is.
 
I'll show you in just a sec.
 
The burner has two rings of gas flames.
 
12:34 AM
Yup, I know.
That fixes the problem where the heat is horribly uneven (one of the other sometimes issues with gas stoves).
 
And it depends also on the gas and probably the pressure.
@Jefromi It also increases the output of energy.
 
Okay, I know there are variables. What I'm saying is, with the stove that you will actually have in practice, the gas heat output is lower than the electric heat output.
You're not going to be standing around in your kitchen and say, oh, this gas stove would have the same heat output as my electric stove if only the energy density of the natural gas were higher, and my gas line had higher pressure, and the burner were bigger.
Your gas stove is just going to not boil water as fast.
 
It is possible, but I question how you could be so certain. And, again, what is practice?
We may have different gas here from what you have.
 
I'm so certain because it's been true on every single gas and electric stove I've ever used, and it's consistent with everything I've seen anyone ever say on the internet.
 
I am saying this because in my experience, in practice, gas seems to boil water faster, but I'm not 100 % sure.
Hmm it seems Canadian gas has more methane and less nitrogen than Dutch gas.
So Canadian gas would appear to have a higher density of energy.
 

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