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Bob
12:26 AM
O_O
this answer and its COMMENTS are SUFFERING from INAPPROPRIATE capitalisation
(FREE, TEXT, ...)
 
1:22 AM
Please anybody Reject this edit, so I can edit the original now that i already rejected an invalid change.
 
1:49 AM
Any way to remote desktop a pc that's sleeping?
 
@DemCodeLines What kind of sleep?
 
2:08 AM
@DemCodeLines can you wake on lan it?
 
2:57 AM
@Bob Wolve. :-)
 
Bob
3:10 AM
@ÃŁŁǫǛȉЖΦΤїҪ :D
 
@Bob: ugh. SaladCAse, and BOLDABUSE
 
Ugh... I Wish I Had A Mark As Duplicate Button At Work.
 
Bob
@ÃŁŁǫǛȉЖΦΤїҪ I might make that my new gravatar, actually
 
 
1 hour later…
Bob
@Kyron You're using the wrong approach.
 
How should I be going about this?
 
Bob
Port forwarding is used only to forward a single (incoming) port, typically on a NATed network. If you want to use general outgoing connections, e.g. web browsing, then that won't really work.
@Kyron With a VPN, typically you'll want to set up your computer's routing tables so any requests to a certain destination IP gets sent through the tunnel.
Unfortunately, that's not something you can really control on the browser level.
 
Hmm. /:
 
Bob
On the browser level, you can use a SOCKS proxy.
There may be a SOCKS proxy server implementation that can route over a specific interface (the tunnel).
@Kyron One rather roundabout way would be to run a VM that forwards all outgoing traffic through the VPN. Then set up a SOCKS server on that machine and point your browser on your primary machine at that SOCKS proxy.
 
4:57 AM
That does seem a little heavy though.
 
Bob
Yea.
Ideally you'd be able to find a SOCKS server that lets you choose an outgoing interface/IP.
Pretend your computer has two network cards. It effectively does, just not physical.
@Kyron You should be able to use Dante, assuming you have a *nix machine.
Look at the "Server address specification" section
You'd want to set external to your tun interface
Then you can point your web browser at the internal address
 
Not sure what *nix is an abbreviation for, heh. I'm running linux.
Debian*
 
Ah, greta.
great*
 
Its not meant for that (its more of a load balancer) but dispatch proxy may work there
 
5:06 AM
Cool. And would I be able to run multiple socks servers?
 
Bob
@JourneymanGeek Looks like it would.
 
Bob
@Kyron Yea, each one just needs its own internal listening socket (IP/port combo).
Dispatch-proxy is just another (simpler, I guess) SOCKS proxy.
 
@Bob: and port
 
Bob
@JourneymanGeek I knew I forgot something :P
 
5:07 AM
Could I not use the same internal IP while using a different port.
 
Bob
@Kyron See above :P
 
port is probably more critical here since you'd want each proxy listening on a seperate localhost port, and sending information to a different outward facing ip address
 
Bob
127.0.0.1:8080 and 127.0.0.1:8081 would work. Or you could do one on 127.0.0.1:8080 and another on 127.0.0.2:8080; it's not really important
as long as the combination of IP and port are unique
some cases, you'd prefer a different port. others, you'd prefer a different IP
 
Ah, I see. That's great!
 
Bob
o.O
-4
Q: What specs should I upgrade on my laptop if I were to use it to play games?

Fluorescent GreenMy laptop, Inspiron 1525, is SLOW. It is almost impossible to play Portal 2 and Portal 1 is laggy but still playable. I still managed to beat the game. Half Life 2 episode 2 is possibly even laggier than Portal 2. Minecraft is quite laggy. My hard drive stores 136GB of memory. Here are my specs:...

I mean... ignoring the shopping-question part, and the hardware, the sheer amount of crap he has running in the background scares me. And, yes, I'm being hypocritical :)
 
5:11 AM
"get a new computer"
SOLVED!
 
Bob
Whenever I see anyone asking about good laptop configurations for gaming, I just want to say You're Doing It Wrong
The entire existence of Alienware confuses me, too.
 
"cant you people bother clicking the link?" .... Rude.

Oh, and, can you shoot me some links to learning about networking/routing etc. I'm fairly interested in it since I started looking into it.
 
lol
or the blade.
 
Bob
@Kyron I'm not really aware of any general material, but I'd be happy to answer somewhat more specific questions if you ask here.
 
Really though, ig you want a long term gaming box, get a desktop
 
Bob
5:14 AM
Otherwise, you can take a look at the OSI model and TCP/IP, to start with.
(Note that the OSI model is theoretical, and the practical TCP/IP we use doesn't directly map to it.)
That goes for devices too. You know those boxes you get called "routers"? They're usually some physical connectors (layer 1), a switch (layer 2), a wireless access point (layer 2) and a router (layer 3), does NAT (layer 3/4) and often a web-based configuration interface (layer 7) in one box. Jam more features in, sell more.
Enterprise routers tend to be more strict :P
@JourneymanGeek Or a not-terribly-overpriced one? :P
As far as I'm concerned a gaming laptop is just an overpriced toaster.
 
lol
@Bob: true
I still want a blade someday ;p
 
Bob
Kinda fun to dream about, but as far as practicality goes...
 
I'd probably be ok with a 500 dollar cheapie or a netbook chromebook? ;p
 
@Bob Ahh, I was reading about L3 Routing. - Now I see where the L3 comes from. Heh.
 
Bob
@JourneymanGeek Now let's not go too underpowered :P
 
5:22 AM
(don't forget, nearly every laptop I've owned is a thinkpad)
@Bob: My mobile needs are pretty limited
all I need is a decent connection and SSH
 
Bob
I have my eyes on the Surface Pro 3 (or 4), though. Very expensive, but nice build, pretty powerful, and very portable.
@Kyron Yea, take a look at the OSI model for a general idea of how each layer is separated.
Basically, when you go up a layer you just expect the lower layers to handle things for you.
If you write a web browser, you (ideally) shouldn't have to worry about how the traffic is routed towards the destination, or how congestion control works, etc..
You just tell the lower-level libraries to open a socket to some ip:port combination and let them figure that out.
Of course, in the real world there's a lot of overlap. But it's nice to get the concepts clear first.
I've ranted a fair bit in here about those things called "routers", because people tend to mix up their capabilities, then they use a router where they really want a switch or access point, etc. (Introducing a router where you want a switch tends to segment the network so you can no longer directly communicate between two machines. Especially since consumer routers always imply NAT.)
 
@Bob: well my laptop's mainly used for OOo/MS office, web and chat
I don't need a ton of power on it
 
Bob
5:37 AM
> web
Have you seen my web browsing habits? :P
 
Oh, by the way, when setting up dante, how would I create multiple configurations/ different ip/port-interface 's. I can't seem to see anything about that in the docs.
 
Bob
5:58 AM
@Kyron See man sockd
Specifically, sockd -f file should help
Add -D to cause it to run in the background
The init scripts/service entries that are installed with it likely only work with the default config file
you can look up ways to add additional init scripts in debian, or manage running servers
runit is an init scheme for Unix-like operating systems that initializes, supervises, and ends processes throughout the operating system. Runit is a "reimplementation" of the "seminal" daemontools process supervision toolkit that runs on the Linux, Mac OS X, *BSD, and Solaris operating systems. Runit features parellelization of the start up of system services, which can speed up the boot time of the operating system. Runit is an init daemon, so it is the direct or indirect ancestor of all other processes. It is the first process started during booting, and continues running until the system is...
There's also restartd and supervisord. I've used the latter before, and it's pretty easy.
 
6:13 AM
or upstart, though that's getting replaced by systemd.
 

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