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12:20 PM
I just found my initial notes on this planet that say that the star it orbits, primary, is slightly larger than Sun while secondary is slightly smaller. I think it was meant to be akin to the Alpha Centauri AB system.
The orbital separation between stars is 20 to 30 AU. Supposedly to have some periodic variation in the planet's climate over the secondary's orbit around the primary while allowing planet stable orbit.
 
 
7 hours later…
7:23 PM
@KrišjānisLiepiņš 20 AU is roughly the aphelion of Uranus. It doesn't get much solar heat. ;) By the inverse square law, the solar energy (per unit area) is ~1/400 what we get at 1 AU. But I expect that planet orbits in such a system will be fairly dynamic. I'm not sure what it will do to your eccentric planet. Generally, planet orbits tend to evolve towards circularity, but perturbations can maintain & even increase eccentricity, and affect precession.
I made some graphs for your planet. First, here's the declination. If the sun's declination equals your latitude, then the sun is directly overhead at noon.
I put the perihelion in the middle of the year. And I set it so the maximum southern declination is at perihelion.
Here's a plot of the relative total solar energy received over the whole planet.
The 100% level is the energy received over the whole planet, averaged over a whole year.
We can get a rough idea of the climate at a given latitude by combining the declination & energy data. That tells us how much energy the place gets at noon. But I stress that it's only a rough guide because it ignores the changing angle of the sun over the day, and it ignores the number of hours that the sun's above the horizon. Here's the plot for latitude 30° north.
The 100% line is the same amount of energy as the previous graph. Here's a Sage script which runs on the SageMathCell server that lets you make plots for any latitude.
If the graph dips below the zero percent line that means the sun is not above the horizon at noon on that day.
 

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